• We present an investigation of a coronal cavity observed above the western limb in the coronal red line Fe X 6374 {\AA} using a telescope of Peking University and in the green line Fe XIV 5303 {\AA} using a telescope of Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences during the total solar eclipse on 2017 August 21. A series of magnetic field models are constructed based on the magnetograms taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) one week before the eclipse. The model field lines are then compared with coronal structures seen in images taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board SDO and in our coronal red line images. The best-fit model consists of a flux rope with a twist angle of 3.1$\pi$, which is consistent with the most probable value of the total twist angle of interplanetary flux ropes observed at 1 AU. Linear polarization of the Fe XIII 10747 {\AA} line calculated from this model shows a "lagomorphic" signature that is also observed by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter of the High Altitude Observatory. We also find a ring-shaped structure in the line-of-sight velocity of Fe XIII 10747 {\AA}, which implies hot plasma flows along a helical magnetic field structure, in the cavity. These results suggest that the magnetic structure of the cavity is a highly twisted flux rope, which may erupt eventually. The temperature structure of the cavity has also been investigated using the intensity ratio of Fe XIII 10747 {\AA} and Fe X 6374 {\AA}.
  • Solid evidence of magnetic reconnection is rarely reported within sunspots, the darkest regions with the strongest magnetic fields and lowest temperatures in the solar atmosphere. Using the world's largest solar telescope, the 1.6-meter Goode Solar Telescope, we detect prevalent reconnection through frequently occurring fine-scale jets in the H${\alpha}$ line wings at light bridges, the bright lanes that may divide the dark sunspot core into multiple parts. Many jets have an inverted Y-shape, shown by models to be typical of reconnection in a unipolar field environment. Simultaneous spectral imaging data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph show that the reconnection drives bidirectional flows up to 200~km~s$^{-1}$, and that the weakly ionized plasma is heated by at least an order of magnitude up to $\sim$80,000 K. Such highly dynamic reconnection jets and efficient heating should be properly accounted for in future modeling efforts of sunspots. Our observations also reveal that the surge-like activity previously reported above light bridges in some chromospheric passbands such as the H${\alpha}$ core has two components: the ever-present short surges likely to be related to the upward leakage of magnetoacoustic waves from the photosphere, and the occasionally occurring long and fast surges that are obviously caused by the intermittent reconnection jets.
  • High-resolution observations of the solar chromosphere and transition region often reveal surge-like oscillatory activities above sunspot light bridges. These oscillations are often interpreted as intermittent plasma jets produced by quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection. We have analyzed the oscillations above a light bridge in a sunspot using data taken by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). The chromospheric 2796\AA{}~images show surge-like activities above the entire light bridge at any time, forming an oscillating wall. Within the wall we often see that the Mg~{\sc{ii}}~k 2796.35\AA{}~line core first experiences a large blueshift, and then gradually decreases to zero shift before increasing to a red shift of comparable magnitude. Such a behavior suggests that the oscillations are highly nonlinear and likely related to shocks. In the 1400\AA{}~passband which samples emission mainly from the Si~{\sc{iv}}~ion, the most prominent feature is a bright oscillatory front ahead of the surges. We find a positive correlation between the acceleration and maximum velocity of the moving front, which is consistent with numerical simulations of upward propagating slow-mode shock waves. The Si~{\sc{iv}} 1402.77\AA{}~line profile is generally enhanced and broadened in the bright front, which might be caused by turbulence generated through compression or by the shocks. These results, together with the fact that the oscillation period stays almost unchanged over a long duration, lead us to propose that the surge-like oscillations above light bridges are caused by shocked p-mode waves leaked from the underlying photosphere.
  • Solar filaments/prominences are one of the most common features in the corona, which may lead to energetic coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and flares when they erupt. Filaments are about one hundred times cooler and denser than the coronal material, and physical understanding of their material origin remains controversial. Two types of scenarios have been proposed: one argues that the filament plasma is brought into the corona from photosphere or chromosphere through a siphon or evaporation/injection process, while the other suggests that the material condenses from the surrounding coronal plasma due to thermal instability. The elemental abundance analysis is a reasonable clue to constrain the models, as the siphon or evaporation/injection model would predict that the filament material abundances are close to the photospheric or chromospheric ones, while the condensation model should have coronal abundances. In this letter, we analyze the elemental abundances of a magnetic cloud that contains the ejected filament material. The corresponding filament eruption occurred on 1998 April 29, accompanying an M6.8 class soft X-ray flare located at the heliographic coordinates S18E20 (NOAA 08210) and a fast halo CME with the linear velocity of 1374 km s$^{-1}$ near the Sun. We find that the abundance ratios of elements with low and high First Ionization Potential such as Fe/O, Mg/O, and Si/O are 0.150, 0.050, and 0.070, respectively, approaching their corresponding photospheric values 0.065, 0.081, and 0.066, which does not support the coronal origin of the filament plasma.
  • Observations of solar wind turbulence indicate the existence of multi-scale pressure-balanced structures (PBSs) in the solar wind. In this work, we conduct a numerical simulation to investigate multi-scale PBSs and in particular their formation in compressive MHD turbulence. By the use of a higher order Godunov code Athena,a driven compressible turbulence with an imposed uniform guide field is simulated. The simulation results show that both the magnetic pressure and the thermal pressure exhibit a turbulent spectrum with a Kolmogorov-like power law, and that in many regions of the simulation domain they are anti-correlated. The computed wavelet cross-coherence spectrum of the magnetic pressure and the thermal pressure, as well as their space series, indicate the existence of multi-scale PBSs, with the small PBSs being embedded in the large ones. These multi-scale PBSs are likely to be related with the highly oblique-propagating slow-mode waves, as the traced multi-scale PBS is found to be traveling in a certain direction at a speed consistent with that predicted theoretically for a slow-mode wave propagating in the same direction.
  • In the solar atmosphere, jets are prevalent and they are significant for the mass and energy transport. Here we conduct numerical simulations to investigate the mass and energy contributions of the recently observed high-speed jets to the solar wind. With a one-dimensional hydrodynamic solar wind model, the time-dependent pulses are imposed at the bottom to simulate the jets. The simulation results show that without other energy source, the injected plasmas are accelerated effectively to be a transonic wind with a substantial mass flux. The rapid acceleration occurs close to the Sun, and the resulting asymptotic speed, number density at 0.3 AU, as well as mass flux normalized to 1 AU are compatible with in situ observations. As a result of the high speed, the imposed pulses generate a train of shocks traveling upward. By tracing the motions of the injected plasma, it is found that these shocks heat and accelerate the injected plasmas successively step by step to push them upward and eventually allow them to escape. The parametric studies show that increasing the speed of the imposed pulses or their temperature gives a considerably faster, and hotter solar wind, while increasing their number density or decreasing their recurring period only bring a denser solar wind. These studies provide a possibility that the ubiquitous high-speed jets are a substantial mass and energy contributions to the solar wind.
  • In the solar atmosphere, the jets are ubiquitous and found to be at various spatia-temporal scales. They are significant to understand energy and mass transport in the solar atmosphere. Recently, the high-speed transition region jets are reported from the observation. Here we conduct a numerical simulation to investigate the mechanism in their formation. Driven by the supergranular convection motion, the magnetic reconnection between the magnetic loop and the background open flux occurring in the transition region is simulated with a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics model. The simulation results show that not only a fast hot jet, much resemble the found transition region jets, but also a adjacent slow cool jet, mostly like classical spicules, is launched. The force analysis shows that the fast hot jet is continually driven by the Lorentz force around the reconnection region, while the slow cool jet is induced by an initial kick through the Lorentz force associated with the emerging magnetic flux. Also, the features of the driven jets change with the amount of the emerging magnetic flux, giving the varieties of both jets. These results will inspire our understanding of the formation of the prevalence of both the fast hot jet and slow cool jet from the solar transition region and chromosphere.
  • Nonlinear cascade of low-frequency Alfvenic fluctuations (AFs) is regarded as one candidate of the energy sources to heat plasma during the non-adiabatic expansion of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). However, AFs inside ICMEs were seldom reported in the literature. In this study, we investigate AFs inside ICMEs using observations from Voyager 2 between 1 and 6 au. It is found that AFs with high degree of Alfvenicity frequently occurred inside ICMEs, for almost all the identified ICMEs (30 out of 33 ICMEs), and 12.6% of ICME time interval. As ICMEs expand and move outward, the percentage of AF duration decays linearly in general. The occurrence rate of AFs inside ICMEs is much less than that in ambient solar wind, especially within 4 au. AFs inside ICMEs are more frequently presented in the center and at the boundaries of ICMEs. In addition, the proton temperature inside ICME has a similar distribution. These findings suggest significant contribution of AFs on local plasma heating inside ICMEs.
  • An observation from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveals coherent oscillations in the loops of an M1.6 flare on 2015 March 12. Both the intensity and Doppler shift of Fe~{\sc{xxi}}~1354.08\AA{}~show clear oscillations with a period of $\sim$25 seconds. Remarkably similar oscillations were also detected in the soft X-ray flux recorded by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). With an estimated phase speed of $\sim$2420~km~s$^{-1}$ and a derived electron density of at least 5.4$\times$10$^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$, the observed short-period oscillation is most likely the global fast sausage mode of a hot flare loop. We find a phase shift of $\sim$$\pi$/2 (1/4 period) between the Doppler shift oscillation and the intensity/GOES oscillations, which is consistent with a recent forward modeling study of the sausage mode. The observed oscillation requires a density contrast between the flare loop and coronal background of a factor $\geqslant$42. The estimated phase speed of the global mode provides an lower limit of the Alfv\'en speed outside the flare loop. We also find an increase of the oscillation period, which might be caused by the separation of the loop footpoints with time.
  • Recent observations by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) have revealed pockets of hot gas ($\sim$2--8$\times$10$^{4}$ K) potentially resulting from magnetic reconnection in the partially ionized lower solar atmosphere (IRIS bombs; IBs). Using joint observations between IRIS and the Chinese New Vacuum Solar Telescope, we have identified ten IBs. We find that three are unambiguously and three others are possibly connected to Ellerman bombs (EBs), which show intense brightening of the extended H$_{\alpha}$ wings without leaving an obvious signature in the H$_{\alpha}$ core. These bombs generally reveal the following distinct properties: (1) The O~{\sc{iv}}~1401.156\AA{} and 1399.774\AA{} lines are absent or very weak; (2) The Mn~{\sc{i}}~2795.640\AA{} line manifests as an absorption feature superimposed on the greatly enhanced Mg~{\sc{ii}}~k line wing; (3) The Mg~{\sc{ii}}~k and h lines show intense brightening in the wings and no dramatic enhancement in the cores; (4) Chromospheric absorption lines such as Ni~{\sc{ii}}~1393.330\AA{} and 1335.203\AA{} are very strong; (5) The 1700\AA{} images obtained with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory reveal intense and compact brightenings. These properties support the formation of these bombs in the photosphere, demonstrating that EBs can be heated much more efficiently than previously thought. We also demonstrate that the Mg~{\sc{ii}}~k and h lines can be used to investigate EBs similarly to H$_{\alpha}$, which opens a promising new window for EB studies. The remaining four IBs obviously have no connection to EBs and they do not have the properties mentioned above, suggesting a higher formation layer possibly in the chromosphere.
  • Quasi-periodic disturbances of emission-line parameters are frequently observed in the corona. These disturbances propagate upward along the magnetic field with speeds $\sim100~\rm{km~s}^{-1}$. This phenomenon has been interpreted as evidence of the propagation of slow magnetosonic waves or argued to be signature of the intermittent outflows superposed on the background plasmas. Here we aim to present a new "wave + flow" model to interpret these observations. In our scenario, the oscillatory motion is a slow mode wave, and the flow is associated with a beam created by the wave-particle interaction owing to Landau resonance. With the help of a Vlasov model, we simulate the propagation of the slow mode wave and the generation of the beam flow. We find that weak periodic beam flows can be generated owing to Landau resonance in the solar corona, and the phase with strongest blueward asymmetry is ahead of that with strongest blueshift by about 1/4 period. We also find that the slow wave damps to the level of 1/e after the transit time of two wave periods, owing to Landau damping and Coulomb collisions in our simulation. This damping time scale is similar to that resulting from thermal-conduction in the magnetohydrodynamics regime. The beam flow is weakened/attenuated with increasing wave period and decreasing wave amplitude since Coulomb collision becomes more and more dominant over the wave action. We suggest that this "wave + flow" kinetic model provides an alternative explanation for the observed quasi-periodic propagating perturbations in various parameters in the solar corona.
  • Intensive studies have been conducted to understand the anisotropy of solar wind turbulence. However, the anisotropy of Els\"asser variables ($\textbf{Z}^\pm$) in 2D wave-vector space has yet to be investigated. Here we first verify the transformation based on the projection-slice theorem between the power spectral density PSD$_{2D}(k_\parallel,k_\perp )$ and the spatial correlation function CF$_{2D} (r_\parallel,r_\perp )$. Based on the application of the transformation to the magnetic field and the particle measurements from the WIND spacecraft, we investigate the spectral anisotropy of Els\"asser variables ($\textbf{Z}^\pm$), and the distribution of residual energy E$_{R}$, Alfv\'en ratio R$_{A}$ and Els\"asser ratio R$_{E}$ in the $(k_\parallel,k_\perp)$ space. The spectra PSD$_{2D}(k_\parallel,k_\perp )$ of $\textbf{B}$, $\textbf{V}$, and $\textbf{Z}_{major}$ (the larger of $\textbf{Z}^\pm$) show a similar pattern that PSD$_{2D}(k_\parallel,k_\perp )$ is mainly distributed along a ridge inclined toward the $k_\perp$ axis. This is probably the signature of the oblique Alfv\'enic fluctuations propagating outwardly. Unlike those of $\textbf{B}$, $\textbf{V}$, and $\textbf{Z}_{major}$, the spectrum PSD$_{2D}(k_\parallel,k_\perp )$ of $\textbf{Z}_{minor}$ is distributed mainly along the $k_\perp$ axis. Close to the $k_\perp$ axis, $\left| {E}_{R}\right|$ becomes larger while R$_{A}$ becomes smaller, suggesting that the dominance of magnetic energy over kinetic energy becomes more significant at small $k_\parallel$. R$_{E}$ is larger at small $k_\parallel$, implying that PSD$_{2D}(k_\parallel,k_\perp )$ of $\textbf{Z}_{minor}$ is more concentrated along the $k_\perp$ direction as compared to that of $\textbf{Z}_{major}$. The residual energy condensate at small $k_\parallel$ is consistent with simulation results in which E$_{R}$ is spontaneously generated by Alfv\'en wave interaction.
  • Magnetohydronamic turbulence is believed to play a crucial role in heating the laboratorial, space, and astrophysical plasmas. However, the precise connection between the turbulent fluctuations and the particle kinetics has not yet been established. Here we present clear evidence of plasma turbulence heating based on diagnosed wave features and proton velocity distributions from solar wind measurements by the Wind spacecraft. For the first time, we can report the simultaneous observation of counter-propagating magnetohydrodynamic waves in the solar wind turbulence. Different from the traditional paradigm with counter-propagating Alfv\'en waves, anti-sunward Alfv\'en waves (AWs) are encountered by sunward slow magnetosonic waves (SMWs) in this new type of solar wind compressible turbulence. The counter-propagating AWs and SWs correspond respectively to the dominant and sub-dominant populations of the imbalanced Els\"asser variables. Nonlinear interactions between the AWs and SMWs are inferred from the non-orthogonality between the possible oscillation direction of one wave and the possible propagation direction of the other. The associated protons are revealed to exhibit bi-directional asymmetric beams in their velocity distributions: sunward beams appearing in short and narrow patterns and anti-sunward broad extended tails. It is suggested that multiple types of wave-particle interactions, i.e., cyclotron and Landau resonances with AWs and SMWs at kinetic scales, are taking place to jointly heat the protons perpendicularly and parallel.
  • Transient brightenings in the transition region of the Sun have been studied for decades and are usually related to magnetic reconnection. Recently, absorption features due to chromospheric lines have been identified in transition region emission lines raising the question of the thermal stratification during such reconnection events. We analyse data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in an emerging active region. Here the spectral profiles show clear self-absorption features in the transition region lines of Si\,{\sc{iv}}. While some indications existed that opacity effects might play some role in strong transition region lines, self-absorption has not been observed before. We show why previous instruments could not observe such self-absorption features, and discuss some implications of this observation for the corresponding structure of reconnection events in the atmosphere. Based on this we speculate that a range of phenomena, such as explosive events, blinkers or Ellerman bombs, are just different aspects of the same reconnection event occurring at different heights in the atmosphere.
  • Measurements of solar wind turbulence reveal the ubiquity of discontinuities. In this study, we investigate how the discontinuities, especially rotational discontinuities (RDs), are formed in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. In a simulation of the decaying compressive three-dimensional (3-D) MHD turbulence with an imposed uniform background magnetic field, we detect RDs with sharp field rotations and little variations of magnetic field intensity as well as mass density. At the same time, in the de Hoffman-Teller (HT) frame, the plasma velocity is nearly in agreement with the Alfv\'{e}n speed, and is field-aligned on both sides of the discontinuity. We take one of the identified RDs to analyze in details its 3-D structure and temporal evolution. By checking the magnetic field and plasma parameters, we find that the identified RD evolves from the steepening of the Alfv\'{e}n wave with moderate amplitude, and that steepening is caused by the nonuniformity of the Alfv\'{e}n speed in the ambient turbulence.
  • In solar wind, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) discontinuities are ubiquitous and often found to be at the origin of turbulence intermittency. They may also play a key role in the turbulence dissipation and heating of the solar wind. The tangential (TD) and rotational (RD) discontinuities are the two most important types of discontinuities. Recently, the connection between turbulence intermittency and proton thermodynamics has been being investigated observationally. Here we present numerical results from three-dimensional MHD simulation with pressure anisotropy and define new methods to identify and to distinguish TDs and RDs. Three statistical results obtained about the relative occurrence rates and heating effects are highlighted: (1) RDs tend to take up the majority of the discontinuities along with time; (2) the thermal states embedding TDs tend to be associated with extreme plasma parameters or instabilities, while RDs do not; (3) TDs have a higher average T as well as perpendicular temperature $T_\perp$. The simulation shows that TDs and RDs evolve and contribute to solar wind heating differently. These results will inspire our understanding of the mechanisms that generate discontinuities and cause plasma heating.
  • The Sun is the only star that we can spatially resolve and it can be regarded as a fundamental plasma laboratory of astrophysics. The solar transition region (TR), the layer between the solar chromosphere and corona, plays an important role in solar wind origin and coronal heating. Recent high-resolution observations made by SOHO, TRACE, and Hinode indicate that the TR is highly nonuniform and magnetically structured. Through a combination of spectroscopic observations and magnetic field extrapolations, the TR magnetic structures and plasma properties have been found to be different in coronal holes and in the quiet Sun. In active regions, the TR density and temperature structures also differ in sunspots and the surrounding plage regions. Although the TR is believed to be a dynamic layer, quasi-steady flows lasting from several hours to several days are often present in the quiet Sun, coronal holes, and active regions, indicating some kind of plasma circulation/convection in the TR and corona. The emission of hydrogen Lyman lines, which originates from the lower TR, has also been intensively investigated in the recent past. Observations show clearly that the flows and dynamics in the middle and upper TR can greatly modify the Lyman line profiles.
  • We present observations of the power spectral anisotropy in wave-vector space of solar wind turbulence, and study how it evolves in interplanetary space with increasing heliocentric distance. For this purpose we use magnetic field measurements made by the Helios-2 spacecraft at three positions between 0.29 and 0.9 AU. To derive the power spectral density (PSD) in $(k_\parallel, k_\bot)$-space based on single-satellite measurements is a challenging task not yet accomplished previously. Here we derive the spectrum $\rm{PSD}_{\rm{2D}}$($\rm{k}_\parallel$, $\rm{k}_\bot$) from the spatial correlation function $\rm{CF}_{\rm{2D}}(r_\parallel, r_\bot)$ by a transformation according to the projection-slice theorem. We find the so constructed PSDs to be distributed in k-space mainly along a ridge that is more inclined toward the $\rm{k}_\bot$ than $\rm{k}_\parallel$ axis, a new result which probably indicates preferential cascading of turbulent energy along the $\rm{k}_\bot$ direction. Furthermore, this ridge of the distribution is found to gradually get closer to the $\rm{k}_\bot$ axis, as the outer scale length of the turbulence becomes larger while the solar wind flows further away from the Sun. In the vicinity of the $\rm{k}_\parallel$ axis, there appears a minor spectral component that probably corresponds to quasi-parallel Alfv\'enic fluctuations. Their relative contribution to the total spectral density tends to decrease with radial distance. These findings suggest that solar wind turbulence undergoes an anisotropic cascade transporting most of its magnetic energy towards larger $\rm{k}_\bot$, and that the anisotropy in the inertial range is radially developing further at scales that are relatively far from the ever increasing outer scale.
  • We analyze several data sets obtained by Hinode/EIS and find various types of flows during CMEs and EUV jet eruptions. CME-induced dimming regions are found to be characterized by significant blueshift and enhanced line width by using a single Gaussian fit. While a red-blue (RB) asymmetry analysis and a RB-guided double Gaussian fit of the coronal line profiles indicate that these are likely caused by the superposition of a strong background emission component and a relatively weak (~10%) high-speed (~100 km s-1) upflow component. This finding suggests that the outflow velocity in the dimming region is probably of the order of 100 km s-1, not ~20 km s-1 as reported previously. Density and temperature diagnostics suggest that dimming is primarily an effect of density decrease rather than temperature change. The mass losses in dimming regions as estimated from different methods are roughly consistent with each other and they are 20%-60% of the masses of the associated CMEs. With the guide of RB asymmetry analysis, we also find several temperature-dependent outflows (speed increases with temperature) immediately outside the (deepest) dimming region. In an erupted CME loop and an EUV jet, profiles of emission lines formed at coronal and transition region temperatures are found to exhibit two well-separated components, an almost stationary component accounting for the background emission and a highly blueshifted (~200 km s-1) component representing emission from the erupting material. The two components can easily be decomposed through a double Gaussian fit and we can diagnose the electron density, temperature and mass of the ejecta. Combining the speed of the blueshifted component and the projected speed of the erupting material derived from simultaneous imaging observations, we can calculate the real speed of the ejecta.
  • Observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) reveal ubiquitous episodic outflows (jets) with an average speed around 120 km s-1 at temperatures often exceeding a million degree in plume-like structures, rooted in magnetized regions of the quiet solar atmosphere. These outflows are not restricted to the well-known plumes visible in polar coronal holes, but are also present in plume-like structures originating from equatorial coronal holes and quiet-Sun regions. Outflows are also visible in the "interplume" regions throughout the atmosphere. Furthermore, the structures traced out by these flows in both plume and inter-plume regions continually exhibit transverse (Alfvenic) motion. Our finding suggests that high-speed outflows originate mainly from the magnetic network of the quiet Sun and coronal holes, and that the plume flows observed are highlighted by the denser plasma contained therein. These outflows might be an efficient means to provide heated mass into the corona and serve as an important source of mass supply to the solar wind. We demonstrate that the quiet-Sun plume flows can sometimes significantly contaminate the spectroscopic observations of the adjacent coronal holes - greatly affecting the Doppler shifts observed, thus potentially impacting significant investigations of such regions.
  • The interaction between interplanetary small-scale magnetic flux ropes and the magnetic field in the ambient solar wind is an important topic to understand- ing the evolution of magnetic structures in the heliosphere. Through a survey of 125 previously reported small flux ropes from 1995 to 2005, we find that 44 of them reveal clear signatures of Alfvenic fluctuations, and thus classify them into Alfven wave trains rather than flux ropes. Signatures of magnetic reconnection, generally including a plasma jet of ~30 km/s within a magnetic field rotational region, are clearly present at boundaries of about 42% of the flux ropes and 14% of the wave trains. The reconnection exhausts are often observed to show a local increase in the proton temperature, density and plasma beta. About 66% of the reconnection events at flux rope boundaries are associated with a magnetic field shear angle larger than 90 deg and 73% of them reveal a decrease by 20% or more in the magnetic field magnitude, suggesting a dominance of anti-parallel reconnec- tion at flux rope boundaries. The occurrence rate of magnetic reconnection at flux rope boundaries through the year of 1995 to 2005 is also investigated and we find that it is relatively low around solar maximum and much higher when ap- proaching solar minima. The average magnetic field depression and shear angle for reconnection events at flux rope boundaries also reveal a similar trend from 1995 to 2005. Our results demonstrate for the first time that boundaries of a substantial fraction of small-scale flux ropes have properties similar to those of magnetic clouds, in the sense that both of them exhibit signatures of magnetic reconnection. The observed reconnection signatures could be related either to the formation of small flux ropes, or to the interaction between flux ropes and the interplanetary magnetic fields.
  • The prominent blue shifts of Ne viii associated with the junctions of the magnetic network in the quiet Sun are still not well understood. By comparing the coronal magnetic-field structures as obtained by a potential-field reconstruction with the conspicuous blue-shift patches on the dopplergram of Ne viii as observed in an equatorial quiet-Sun region, we find that most of the regions with significant upflow are associated with the funnel-like legs of magnetic loops and co-spatial with increments of the line width. These quasi-steady upflows can be regarded as the signatures of mass supply to coronal loops. By using the square-root of the line intensity as a proxy for the plasma density, the mass flux of the upflow in each funnel can be estimated. We find that the mass flux is anti-correlated with the funnel's expansion factor as determined from the extrapolated magnetic field. One of the loop systems is associated with a coronal bright point, which was observed by several instruments and exhibited various morphologies in different wavelengths and viewing directions. A remarkable agreement between its magnetic structure and the associated EUV emission pattern was found, suggesting an almost potential-field nature of the coronal magnetic field. We also report the direct detection of a small-scale siphon flow by both STEREO satellites. However, this transient siphon flow occurred in a weak mixed-polarity-field region, which was outside the adjacent magnetic funnel, and thus it is perhaps not related to plasma upflow in the funnel. Based on these observations, we suggest that at upper-TR temperatures the dominant flows in quiet-Sun coronal loops are long-lasting upflows rather than siphon flows. We also discuss the implications for coronal heating and unresolved magnetic structures.
  • We performed a systematic study of the Doppler shifts and electron densities measured in an EUV bright point (hereafter BP) observed in more than 10 EUV lines with formation temperatures from log (T/K) p 4.5 to 6.3. Those parts of a BP seen in transition region and coronal lines are defined as its cool and hot components, respectively. We find that the transition from cool to hot occurs at a temperature around log (T/K) p 5.7. The two components of the BP reveal a totally different orientation and Doppler-shift pattern, which might result from a twist of the associated magnetic loop system. The analysis of magnetic field evolution and topology seems to favor a two-stage heating process, in which magnetic cancellation and separator reconnection are powering, respectively, the cool and hot components of the BP. We also found that the electron densities of both components of the BP are higher than those of the surrounding quiet Sun, and comparable to or smaller than active region densities.