• Given a quantum gate $U$ acting on a bipartite quantum system, its maximum (average, minimum) entangling power is the maximum (average, minimum) entanglement generation with respect to certain entanglement measure when the inputs are restricted to be product states. In this paper, we mainly focus on the 'weakest' one, i.e., the minimum entangling power, among all these entangling powers. We show that, by choosing von Neumann entropy of reduced density operator or Schmidt rank as entanglement measure, even the 'weakest' entangling power is generically very close to its maximal possible entanglement generation. In other words, maximum, average and minimum entangling powers are generically close. We then study minimum entangling power with respect to other Lipschitiz-continuous entanglement measures and generalize our results to multipartite quantum systems. As a straightforward application, a random quantum gate will almost surely be an intrinsically fault-tolerant entangling device that will always transform every low-entangled state to near-maximally entangled state.
  • Let $V=\bigotimes_{k=1}^{N} V_{k}$ be the $N$ spin-$j$ Hilbert space with $d=2j+1$-dimensional single particle space. We fix an orthonormal basis $\{|m_i\rangle\}$ for each $V_{k}$, with weight $m_i\in \{-j,\ldots j\}$. Let $V_{(w)}$ be the subspace of $V$ with a constant weight $w$, with an orthonormal basis $\{|m_1,\ldots,m_N\rangle\}$ subject to $\sum_k m_k=w$. We show that the combinatorial properties of the constant weight condition imposes strong constraints on the reduced density matrices for any vector $|\psi\rangle$ in the constant weight subspace, which limits the possible entanglement structures of $|\psi\rangle$. Our results find applications in the overlapping quantum marginal problems, quantum error-correcting codes, and the spin-network structures in quantum gravity.
  • We introduce a distributed classical simulation algorithm for general quantum circuits, and present numerical results for calculating the output probabilities of universal random circuits. We find that we can simulate more qubits to greater depth than previously reported using the cluster supported by the Data Infrastructure and Search Technology Division of the Alibaba Group. For example, computing a single amplitude of an $8\times 8$ qubit circuit with depth $40$ was previously beyond the reach of supercomputers. Our algorithm can compute this within $2$ minutes using a small portion ($\approx$ 14% of the nodes) of the cluster. Furthermore, by successfully simulating quantum supremacy circuits of size $9\times 9\times 40$, $10\times 10\times 35 $, $11\times 11\times 31$, and $12\times 12\times 27 $, we give evidence that noisy random circuits with realistic physical parameters may be simulated classically. This suggests that either harder circuits or error-correction may be vital for achieving quantum supremacy from random circuit sampling.
  • One of the applications of quantum technology is to use quantum states and measurements to communicate which offers more reliable security promises. Quantum data hiding, which gives the source party the ability of sharing data among multiple receivers and revealing it at a later time depending on his/her will, is one of the promising information sharing schemes which may address practical security issues. In this work, we propose a novel quantum data hiding protocol. By concatenating different subprotocols which apply to rather symmetric hiding scenarios, we cover a variety of more general hiding scenarios. We provide the general requirements for constructing such protocols and give explicit examples of encoding states for five parties. We also proved the security of the protocol in sense that the achievable information by unauthorized operations asymptotically goes to zero. In addition, due to the capability of the sender to manipulate his/her subsystem, the sender is able to abort the protocol remotely at any time before he/she reveals the information.
  • How many quantum queries are required to determine the coefficients of a degree-$d$ polynomial in $n$ variables? We present and analyze quantum algorithms for this multivariate polynomial interpolation problem over the fields $\mathbb{F}_q$, $\mathbb{R}$, and $\mathbb{C}$. We show that $k_{\mathbb{C}}$ and $2k_{\mathbb{C}}$ queries suffice to achieve probability $1$ for $\mathbb{C}$ and $\mathbb{R}$, respectively, where $k_{\mathbb{C}}=\smash{\lceil\frac{1}{n+1}{n+d\choose d}\rceil}$ except for $d=2$ and four other special cases. For $\mathbb{F}_q$, we show that $\smash{\lceil\frac{d}{n+d}{n+d\choose d}\rceil}$ queries suffice to achieve probability approaching $1$ for large field order $q$. The classical query complexity of this problem is $\smash{n+d\choose d}$, so our result provides a speedup by a factor of $n+1$, $\frac{n+1}{2}$, and $\frac{n+d}{d}$ for $\mathbb{C}$, $\mathbb{R}$, and $\mathbb{F}_q$, respectively. Thus we find a much larger gap between classical and quantum algorithms than the univariate case, where the speedup is by a factor of $2$. For the case of $\mathbb{F}_q$, we conjecture that $2k_{\mathbb{C}}$ queries also suffice to achieve probability approaching $1$ for large field order $q$, although we leave this as an open problem.
  • We show that a generic $N$-qudit pure quantum state is uniquely determined by only $2$ of its $\lceil\frac{N+1}{2}\rceil$-particle reduced density matrices. Therefore we give a method to uniquely determine a generic $N$-qudit pure state of dimension $D=d^N$ with $O(D)$ local measurements, which is an improvement comparing with the previous known approach using $O(D\log^2 D)$ or $O(D\log D)$ measurements.
  • The problem of determining whether a given quantum state is entangled lies at the heart of quantum information processing, which is known to be an NP-hard problem in general. Despite the proposed many methods such as the positive partial transpose (PPT) criterion and the k-symmetric extendibility criterion to tackle this problem in practice, none of them enables a general, effective solution to the problem even for small dimensions. Explicitly, separable states form a high-dimensional convex set, which exhibits a vastly complicated structure. In this work, we build a new separability-entanglement classifier underpinned by machine learning techniques. Our method outperforms the existing methods in generic cases in terms of both speed and accuracy, opening up the avenues to explore quantum entanglement via the machine learning approach.
  • In recent years, several measures have been proposed for characterizing the coherence of a given quantum state. We derive several results that illuminate how these measures behave when restricted to pure states. Notably, we present an explicit characterization of the closest incoherent state to a given pure state under the trace distance measure of coherence. We then use this result to show that the states maximizing the trace distance of coherence are exactly the maximally coherent states. We define the trace distance of entanglement and show that it coincides with the trace distance of coherence for pure states. Finally, we give an alternate proof to a recent result that the $\ell_1$ measure of coherence of a pure state is never smaller than its relative entropy of coherence.
  • The reduced density matrices of a many-body quantum system form a convex set, whose three-dimensional projection $\Theta$ is convex in $\mathbb{R}^3$. The boundary $\partial\Theta$ of $\Theta$ may exhibit nontrivial geometry, in particular ruled surfaces. Two physical mechanisms are known for the origins of ruled surfaces: symmetry breaking and gapless. In this work, we study the emergence of ruled surfaces for systems with local Hamiltonians in infinite spatial dimension, where the reduced density matrices are known to be separable as a consequence of the quantum de Finetti's theorem. This allows us to identify the reduced density matrix geometry with joint product numerical range $\Pi$ of the Hamiltonian interaction terms. We focus on the case where the interaction terms have certain structures, such that ruled surface emerge naturally when taking a convex hull of $\Pi$. We show that, a ruled surface on $\partial\Theta$ sitting in $\Pi$ has a gapless origin, otherwise it has a symmetry breaking origin. As an example, we demonstrate that a famous ruled surface, known as the oloid, is a possible shape of $\Theta$, with two boundary pieces of symmetry breaking origin separated by two gapless lines.
  • Quantum state tomography via local measurements is an efficient tool for characterizing quantum states. However it requires that the original global state be uniquely determined (UD) by its local reduced density matrices (RDMs). In this work we demonstrate for the first time a class of states that are UD by their RDMs under the assumption that the global state is pure, but fail to be UD in the absence of that assumption. This discovery allows us to classify quantum states according to their UD properties, with the requirement that each class be treated distinctly in the practice of simplifying quantum state tomography. Additionally we experimentally test the feasibility and stability of performing quantum state tomography via the measurement of local RDMs for each class. These theoretical and experimental results advance the project of performing efficient and accurate quantum state tomography in practice.
  • We examine the problem of finding the minimum number of Pauli measurements needed to uniquely determine an arbitrary $n$-qubit pure state among all quantum states. We show that only $11$ Pauli measurements are needed to determine an arbitrary two-qubit pure state compared to the full quantum state tomography with $16$ measurements, and only $31$ Pauli measurements are needed to determine an arbitrary three-qubit pure state compared to the full quantum state tomography with $64$ measurements. We demonstrate that our protocol is robust under depolarizing error with simulated random pure states. We experimentally test the protocol on two- and three-qubit systems with nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. We show that the pure state tomography protocol saves us a number of measurements without considerable loss of fidelity. We compare our protocol with same-size sets of randomly selected Pauli operators and find that our selected set of Pauli measurements significantly outperforms those random sampling sets. As a direct application, our scheme can also be used to reduce the number of settings needed for pure-state tomography in quantum optical systems.
  • Entanglement, one of the central mysteries of quantum mechanics, plays an essential role in numerous applications of quantum information theory. A natural question of both theoretical and experimental importance is whether universal entanglement detection is possible without full state tomography. In this work, we prove a no-go theorem that rules out this possibility for any non-adaptive schemes that employ single-copy measurements only. We also examine in detail a previously implemented experiment, which claimed to detect entanglement of two-qubit states via adaptive single-copy measurements without full state tomography. By performing the experiment and analyzing the data, we demonstrate that the information gathered is indeed sufficient to reconstruct the state. These results reveal a fundamental limit for single-copy measurements in entanglement detection, and provides a general framework to study the detection of other interesting properties of quantum states, such as the positivity of partial transpose and the $k$-symmetric extendibility.
  • The quantum marginal problem asks whether a set of given density matrices are consistent, i.e., whether they can be the reduced density matrices of a global quantum state. Not many non-trivial analytic necessary (or sufficient) conditions are known for the problem in general. We propose a method to detect consistency of overlapping quantum marginals by considering the separability of some derived states. Our method works well for the $k$-symmetric extension problem in general, and for the general overlapping marginal problems in some cases. Our work is, in some sense, the converse to the well-known $k$-symmetric extension criterion for separability.
  • In this paper, we discuss the connection between two genuinely quantum phenomena --- the discontinuity of quantum maximum entropy inference and quantum phase transitions at zero temperature. It is shown that the discontinuity of the maximum entropy inference of local observable measurements signals the non-local type of transitions, where local density matrices of the ground state change smoothly at the transition point. We then propose to use the quantum conditional mutual information of the ground state as an indicator to detect the discontinuity and the non-local type of quantum phase transitions in the thermodynamic limit.
  • Quantum key distribution uses public discussion protocols to establish shared secret keys. In the exploration of ultimate limits to such protocols, the property of symmetric extendibility of underlying bipartite states $\rho_{AB}$ plays an important role. A bipartite state $\rho_{AB}$ is symmetric extendible if there exits a tripartite state $\rho_{ABB'}$, such that the $AB$ marginal state is identical to the $AB'$ marginal state, i.e. $\rho_{AB'}=\rho_{AB}$. For a symmetric extendible state $\rho_{AB}$, the first task of the public discussion protocol is to break this symmetric extendibility. Therefore to characterize all bi-partite quantum states that possess symmetric extensions is of vital importance. We prove a simple analytical formula that a two-qubit state $\rho_{AB}$ admits a symmetric extension if and only if $\tr(\rho_B^2)\geq \tr(\rho_{AB}^2)-4\sqrt{\det{\rho_{AB}}}$. Given the intimate relationship between the symmetric extension problem and the quantum marginal problem, our result also provides the first analytical necessary and sufficient condition for the quantum marginal problem with overlapping marginals.
  • We discuss the concept of unextendible product basis (UPB) and generalized UPB for fermionic systems, using Slater determinants as an analogue of product states, in the antisymmetric subspace $\wedge^ N \bC^M$. We construct an explicit example of generalized fermionic unextendible product basis (FUPB) of minimum cardinality $N(M-N)+1$ for any $N\ge2,M\ge4$. We also show that any bipartite antisymmetric space $\wedge^ 2 \bC^M$ of codimension two is spanned by Slater determinants, and the spaces of higher codimension may not be spanned by Slater determinants. Furthermore, we construct an example of complex FUPB of $N=2,M=4$ with minimum cardinality $5$. In contrast, we show that a real FUPB does not exist for $N=2,M=4$ . Finally we provide a systematic construction for FUPBs of higher dimensions using FUPBs and UPBs of lower dimensions.
  • A universal entangler (UE) is a unitary operation which maps all pure product states to entangled states. It is known that for a bipartite system of particles $1,2$ with a Hilbert space $\mathbb{C}^{d_1}\otimes\mathbb{C}^{d_2}$, a UE exists when $\min{(d_1,d_2)}\geq 3$ and $(d_1,d_2)\neq (3,3)$. It is also known that whenever a UE exists, almost all unitaries are UEs; however to verify whether a given unitary is a UE is very difficult since solving a quadratic system of equations is NP-hard in general. This work examines the existence and construction of UEs of bipartite bosonic/fermionic systems whose wave functions sit in the symmetric/antisymmetric subspace of $\mathbb{C}^{d}\otimes\mathbb{C}^{d}$. The development of a theory of UEs for these types of systems needs considerably different approaches from that used for UEs of distinguishable systems. This is because the general entanglement of identical particle systems cannot be discussed in the usual way due to the effect of (anti)-symmetrization which introduces "pseudo entanglement" that is inaccessible in practice. We show that, unlike the distinguishable particle case, UEs exist for bosonic/fermionic systems with Hilbert spaces which are symmetric (resp. antisymmetric) subspaces of $\mathbb{C}^{d}\otimes\mathbb{C}^{d}$ if and only if $d\geq 3$ (resp. $d\geq 8$). To prove this we employ algebraic geometry to reason about the different algebraic structures of the bosonic/fermionic systems. Additionally, due to the relatively simple coherent state form of unentangled bosonic states, we are able to give the explicit constructions of two bosonic UEs. Our investigation provides insight into the entanglement properties of systems of indisitinguishable particles, and in particular underscores the difference between the entanglement structures of bosonic, fermionic and distinguishable particle systems.
  • Symmetry is at the heart of coding theory. Codes with symmetry, especially cyclic codes, play an essential role in both theory and practical applications of classical error-correcting codes. Here we examine symmetry properties for codeword stabilized (CWS) quantum codes, which is the most general framework for constructing quantum error-correcting codes known to date. A CWS code Q can be represented by a self-dual additive code S and a classical code C, i.,e., Q=(S,C), however this representation is in general not unique. We show that for any CWS code Q with certain permutation symmetry, one can always find a self-dual additive code S with the same permutation symmetry as Q such that Q=(S,C). As many good CWS codes have been found by starting from a chosen S, this ensures that when trying to find CWS codes with certain permutation symmetry, the choice of S with the same symmetry will suffice. A key step for this result is a new canonical representation for CWS codes, which is given in terms of a unique decomposition as union stabilizer codes. For CWS codes, so far mainly the standard form (G,C) has been considered, where G is a graph state. We analyze the symmetry of the corresponding graph of G, which in general cannot possess the same permutation symmetry as Q. We show that it is indeed the case for the toric code on a square lattice with translational symmetry, even if its encoding graph can be chosen to be translational invariant.
  • We discuss the uniqueness of quantum states compatible with given results for measuring a set of observables. For a given pure state, we consider two different types of uniqueness: (1) no other pure state is compatible with the same measurement results and (2) no other state, pure or mixed, is compatible with the same measurement results. For case (1), it is known that for a d-dimensional Hilbert space, there exists a set of 4d-5 observables that uniquely determines any pure state. We show that for case (2), 5d-7 observables suffice to uniquely determine any pure state. Thus there is a gap between the results for (1) and (2), and we give some examples to illustrate this. The case of observables corresponding to reduced density matrices (RDMs) of a multipartite system is also discussed, where we improve known bounds on local dimensions for case (2) in which almost all pure states are uniquely determined by their RDMs. We further discuss circumstances where (1) can imply (2). We use convexity of the numerical range of operators to show that when only two observables are measured, (1) always implies (2). More generally, if there is a compact group of symmetries of the state space which has the span of the observables measured as the set of fixed points, then (1) implies (2). We analyze the possible dimensions for the span of such observables. Our results extend naturally to the case of low rank quantum states.
  • Let $\mathcal{V}=\wedge^N V$ be the $N$-fermion Hilbert space with $M$-dimensional single particle space $V$ and $2N\le M$. We refer to the unitary group $G$ of $V$ as the local unitary (LU) group. We fix an orthonormal (o.n.) basis $\ket{v_1},...,\ket{v_M}$ of $V$. Then the Slater determinants $e_{i_1,...,i_N}:= \ket{v_{i_1}\we v_{i_2}\we...\we v_{i_N}}$ with $i_1<...<i_N$ form an o.n. basis of $\cV$. Let $\cS\subseteq\cV$ be the subspace spanned by all $e_{i_1,...,i_N}$ such that the set $\{i_1,...,i_N\}$ contains no pair $\{2k-1,2k\}$, $k$ an integer. We say that the $\ket{\psi}\in\cS$ are single occupancy states (with respect to the basis $\ket{v_1},...,\ket{v_M}$). We prove that for N=3 the subspace $\cS$ is universal, i.e., each $G$-orbit in $\cV$ meets $\cS$, and that this is false for N>3. If $M$ is even, the well known BCS states are not LU-equivalent to any single occupancy state. Our main result is that for N=3 and $M$ even there is a universal subspace $\cW\subseteq\cS$ spanned by $M(M-1)(M-5)/6$ states $e_{i_1,...,i_N}$. Moreover the number $M(M-1)(M-5)/6$ is minimal.
  • A long-standing open question asks for the minimum number of vectors needed to form an unextendible product basis in a given bipartite or multipartite Hilbert space. A partial solution was found by Alon and Lovasz in 2001, but since then only a few other cases have been solved. We solve all remaining bipartite cases, as well as a large family of multipartite cases.
  • Traditional quantum physics solves ground states for a given Hamiltonian, while quantum information science asks for the existence and construction of certain Hamiltonians for given ground states. In practical situations, one would be mainly interested in local Hamiltonians with certain interaction patterns, such as nearest neighbour interactions on some type of lattices. A necessary condition for a space $V$ to be the ground-state space of some local Hamiltonian with a given interaction pattern, is that the maximally mixed state supported on $V$ is uniquely determined by its reduced density matrices associated with the given pattern, based on the principle of maximum entropy. However, it is unclear whether this condition is in general also sufficient. We examine the situations for the existence of such a local Hamiltonian to have $V$ satisfying the necessary condition mentioned above as its ground-state space, by linking to faces of the convex body of the local reduced states. We further discuss some methods for constructing the corresponding local Hamiltonians with given interaction patterns, mainly from physical points of view, including constructions related to perturbation methods, local frustration-free Hamiltonians, as well as thermodynamical ensembles.
  • We demonstrate the convexity of the difference between the regularized entanglement of purification and the entropy, as a function of the state. This is proved by means of a new asymptotic protocol to prepare a state from pre-shared entanglement and by local operations only. We go on to employ this convexity property in an investigation of the additivity of the (single-copy) entanglement of purification: using numerical results for two-qubit Werner states we find strong evidence that the entanglement of purification is different from its regularization, hence that entanglement of purification is not additive.
  • The structure of the ground spaces of quantum systems consisting of local interactions is of fundamental importance to different areas of physics. In this Letter, we present a necessary and sufficient condition for a subspace to be the ground space of a k-local Hamiltonian. Our analysis are motivated by the concept of irreducible correlations studied by [Linden et al., PRL 89, 277906] and [Zhou, PRL 101, 180505], which is in turn based on the principle of maximum entropy. It establishes a better understanding of the ground spaces of local Hamiltonians and builds an intimate link of ground spaces to the correlations of quantum states.
  • In J. Math. Phys. 13, 1608-1621 (1972), Erdahl considered the convex structure of the set of $N$-representable 2-body reduced density matrices in the case of fermions. Some of these results have a straightforward extension to the $m$-body setting and to the more general quantum marginal problem. We describe these extensions, but can not resolve a problem in the proof of Erdahl's claim that every extreme point is exposed in finite dimensions. Nevertheless, we can show that when $2m \geq N$ every extreme point of the set of $N$-representable $m$-body reduced density matrices has a unique pre-image in both the symmetric and anti-symmetric setting. Moreover, this extends to the quantum marginal setting for a pair of complementary $m$-body and $(N-m)$-body reduced density matrices.