• In this paper, we study time-varying graphical models based on data measured over a temporal grid. Such models are motivated by the needs to describe and understand evolving interacting relationships among a set of random variables in many real applications, for instance the study of how stocks interact with each other and how such interactions change over time. We propose a new model, LOcal Group Graphical Lasso Estimation (loggle), under the assumption that the graph topology changes gradually over time. Specifically, loggle uses a novel local group-lasso type penalty to efficiently incorporate information from neighboring time points and to impose structural smoothness of the graphs. We implement an ADMM based algorithm to fit the loggle model. This algorithm utilizes blockwise fast computation and pseudo-likelihood approximation to improve computational efficiency. An R package loggle has also been developed. We evaluate the performance of loggle by simulation experiments. We also apply loggle to S&P 500 stock price data and demonstrate that loggle is able to reveal the interacting relationships among stocks and among industrial sectors in a time period that covers the recent global financial crisis.
  • The quantum measurement problem, namely how the deterministic quantum evolution leads to probabilistic measurement outcomes, remains a profound question to be answered. In the present work, we propose a spectacular demonstration and test of the subtle and peculiar character of the quantum measurement process. We show that a bright soliton supported by a Bose-Einstein condensate can be reflected as a whole by an electron beam, with neither attraction nor repulsion between the condensate's neutral atoms and the beam's electrons. This macroscopic reflection is purely due to the quantum Zeno dynamics induced by the frequent position measurement of the condensate's atoms by the electron beam. As an example of application, just as a soccer player would stop a coming ball, an electron beam moving backward with half the velocity of the bright soliton can precisely stop the soliton. This offers an entirely new and useful tool for manipulating bright solitons.
  • We propose a two-sample test for detecting the difference between mean vectors in a high-dimensional regime based on a ridge-regularized Hotelling's $T^2$. To choose the regularization parameter, a method is derived that aims at maximizing power within a class of local alternatives. We also propose a composite test that combines the optimal tests corresponding to a specific collection of local alternatives. Weak convergence of the stochastic process corresponding to the ridge-regularized Hotelling's $T^2$ is established and used to derive the cut-off values of the proposed test. Large sample properties are verified for a class of sub-Gaussian distributions. Through an extensive simulation study, the composite test is shown to compare favorably against a host of existing two-sample test procedure in a wide range of settings. The performance of the proposed test procedure is illustrated through an application to a breast cancer data set where the goal is to detect the pathways with different DNA copy number alterations across breast cancer subtypes.
  • Balancing domain decomposition by constraints (BDDC) algorithms with adaptive primal constraints are developed in a concise variational framework for the weighted plane wave least-squares (PWLS) discritization of Helmholtz equations with high and various wave numbers. The unknowns to be solved in this preconditioned system are defined on elements rather than vertices or edges, which are different from the well-known discritizations such as the classical finite element method. Through choosing suitable "interface" and appropriate primal constraints with complex coefficients and introducing some local techniques, we developed a two-level adaptive BDDC algorithm for the PWLS discretization, and the condition number of the preconditioned system is proved to be bounded above by a user-defined tolerance and a constant which is only dependent on the maximum number of interfaces per subdomain. A multilevel algorithm is also attempted to resolve the bottleneck in large scale coarse problem. Numerical results are carried out to confirm the theoretical results and illustrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithms.
  • The quantum Zeno effect is deeply related to the quantum measurement process and thus studies of it may help shed light on the hitherto mysterious measurement process in quantum mechanics. Recently, the spatial quantum Zeno effect is observed in a Bose-Einstein condensate depleted by an electron beam. We theoretically investigate how different intrinsic tendencies of filling affect the quantum Zeno effect in this system by changing the impinging point of the electron beam along the inhomogeneous condensate. Surprisingly, we find no visible effect on the critical dissipation intensity at which the quantum Zeno effect appear. Our finding shows the recent capability of combining the Bose-Einstein condensate with an electron beam offers a great opportunity for studying the spatial quantum Zeno effect, and more generally the dynamics of a quantum many-body system out of equilibrium.
  • A balancing domain decomposition by constraints (BDDC) algorithm with adaptive primal constraints in variational form is introduced and analyzed for high-order mortar discretization of two-dimensional elliptic problems with high varying and random coefficients. Some vector-valued auxiliary spaces and operators with essential properties are defined to describe the variational algorithm, and the coarse space is formed by using a transformation operator on each interface. Compared with the adaptive BDDC algorithms for conforming Galerkin approximations, our algorithm is more simple, because there is not any continuity constraints at subdomain vertices in the mortar method involved in this paper. The condition number of the preconditioned system is proved to be bounded above by a user-defined tolerance and a constant which is dependent on the maximum number of interfaces per subdomain, and independent of the mesh size and the contrast of the given coefficients. Numerical results show the robustness and efficiency of the algorithm for various model problems.
  • We present a novel method for estimation of the fiber orientation distribution (FOD) function based on diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (D-MRI) data. We formulate the problem of FOD estimation as a regression problem through spherical deconvolution and a sparse representation of the FOD by a spherical needlets basis that form a multi-resolution tight frame for spherical functions. This sparse representation allows us to estimate FOD by an $l_1$-penalized regression under a non-negativity constraint. The resulting convex optimization problem is solved by an alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) algorithm. The proposed method leads to a reconstruction of the FODs that is accurate, has low variability and preserves sharp features. Through extensive experiments, we demonstrate the effectiveness and favorable performance of the proposed method compared with two existing methods. Particularly, we show the ability of the proposed method in successfully resolving fiber crossing at small angles and in automatically identifying isotropic diffusion. We also apply the proposed method to real 3T D-MRI data sets of healthy elderly individuals. The results show realistic descriptions of crossing fibers that are more accurate and less noisy than competing methods even with a relatively small number of gradient directions.
  • There are well-known dark states in the even-qubit Dicke models, which are the products of the two-qubit singlets and a Fock state, where the qubits are decoupled from the photon field. These spin singlets can be used to store quantum correlations since they preserve entanglement even under dissipation, driving and dipole-dipole interactions. One of the features for these dark states is that their eigenenergies are independent of the qubitphoton coupling strength. We have obtained a novel kind of dark-like states for the multi-qubit and multi-photon Rabi models, whose eigenenergies are also constant in the whole coupling regime. Unlike the dark states, the qubits and photon field are coupled in the dark-like states. Furthermore, the photon numbers are bounded from above commonly at 1, which is different from that for the one-qubit case. The existence conditions of the dark-like states are simpler than exact isolated solutions, and may be fine tuned in experiments. While the single-qubit and multi-photon Rabi model is well-defined only if the photon number $M\leq2$ and the coupling strength is below a certain critical value, the dark-like eigenstates for multi-qubit and multiphoton Rabi model still exist, regardless of these constraints. In view of these properties of the dark-like states, they may find similar applications like "dark states" in quantum information.
  • The finite volume methods are frequently employed in the discretization of diffusion problems with interface. In this paper, we firstly present a vertex-centered MACH-like finite volume method for solving stationary diffusion problems with strong discontinuity and multiple material cells on the Eulerian grids. This method is motivated by Frese [No. AMRC-R-874, Mission Research Corp., Albuquerque, NM, 1987]. Then, the local truncation error and global error estimates of the degenerate five-point MACH-like scheme are derived by introducing some new techniques. Especially under some assumptions, we prove that this scheme can reach the asymptotic optimal error estimate $O(h^2 |\ln h|)$ in the maximum norm. Finally, numerical experiments verify theoretical results.
  • Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging is an imaging technology designed to probe anatomical architectures of biological samples in an in vivo and non-invasive manner through measuring water diffusion. The contribution of this paper is threefold. First it proposes a new method to identify and estimate multiple diffusion directions within a voxel through a new and identifiable parametrization of the widely used multi-tensor model. Unlike many existing methods, this method focuses on the estimation of diffusion directions rather than the diffusion tensors. Second, this paper proposes a novel direction smoothing method which greatly improves direction estimation in regions with crossing fibers. This smoothing method is shown to have excellent theoretical and empirical properties. Lastly, this paper develops a fiber tracking algorithm that can handle multiple directions within a voxel. The overall methodology is illustrated with simulated data and a data set collected for the study of Alzheimer's disease by the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI).
  • We have found the algebraic structure of the two-qubit quantum Rabi model behind the possibility of its novel quasi-exact solutions with finite photon numbers by analyzing the Hamiltonian in the photon number space. The quasi-exact eigenstates with at most $1$ photon exist in the whole qubit-photon coupling regime with constant eigenenergy equal to single photon energy \hbar\omega, which can be clear demonstrated from the Hamiltonian structure. With similar method, we find these special "dark states"-like eigenstates commonly exist for the two-qubit Jaynes-Cummings model, with $E=N\hbar\omega$ (N=-1,0,1,...), and one of them is also the eigenstate of the two-qubit quantum Rabi model, which may provide some interesting application in a simper way. Besides, using Bogoliubov operators, we analytically retrieve the solution of the general two-qubit quantum Rabi model. In this more concise and physical way, without using Bargmann space, we clearly see how the eigenvalues of the infinite-dimensional two-qubit quantum Rabi Hamiltonian are determined by convergent power series, so that the solution can reach arbitrary accuracy reasonably because of the convergence property.
  • House price increases have been steady over much of the last 40 years, but there have been occasional declines, most notably in the recent housing bust that started around 2007, on the heels of the preceding housing bubble. We introduce a novel growth model that is motivated by time-warping models in functional data analysis and includes a nonmonotone time-warping component that allows the inclusion and description of boom-bust cycles and facilitates insights into the dynamics of asset bubbles. The underlying idea is to model longitudinal growth trajectories for house prices and other phenomena, where temporal setbacks and deflation may be encountered, by decomposing such trajectories into two components. A first component corresponds to underlying steady growth driven by inflation that anchors the observed trajectories on a simple first order linear differential equation, while a second boom-bust component is implemented as time warping. Time warping is a commonly encountered phenomenon and reflects random variation along the time axis. Our approach to time warping is more general than previous approaches by admitting the inclusion of nonmonotone warping functions. The anchoring of the trajectories on an underlying linear dynamic system also makes the time-warping component identifiable and enables straightforward estimation procedures for all model components. The application to the dynamics of housing prices as observed for 19 metropolitan areas in the U.S. from December 1998 to July 2013 reveals that the time setbacks corresponding to nonmonotone time warping vary substantially across markets and we find indications that they are related to market-specific growth rates.
  • We study a class of nonlinear nonparametric inverse problems. Specifically, we propose a nonparametric estimator of the dynamics of a monotonically increasing trajectory defined on a finite time interval. Under suitable regularity conditions, we prove consistency of the proposed estimator and show that in terms of $L^2$-loss, the optimal rate of convergence for the proposed estimator is the same as that for the estimation of the derivative of a trajectory. This is a new contribution to the area of nonlinear nonparametric inverse problems. We conduct a simulation study to examine the finite sample behavior of the proposed estimator and apply it to the Berkeley growth data.
  • Permutations over $F_{2^{2k}}$ with low differential uniform, high algebraic degree and high nonlinearity are of great cryptographical importance since they can be chosen as the substitution boxes (S-boxes) for many block ciphers. A well known example is that the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) chooses a differentially 4-uniform permutation, the multiplicative inverse function, as its S-box. In this paper, we present a new construction of differentially 4-uniformity permutations over even characteristic finite fields and obtain many new CCZ-inequivalent functions. All the functions are switching neighbors in the narrow sense of the multiplicative inverse function and have the optimal algebraic degree and high nonlinearity.
  • Probabilistic graphical models are graphical representations of probability distributions. Graphical models have applications in many fields including biology, social sciences, linguistic, neuroscience. In this paper, we propose directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) learning via bootstrap aggregating. The proposed procedure is named as DAGBag. Specifically, an ensemble of DAGs is first learned based on bootstrap resamples of the data and then an aggregated DAG is derived by minimizing the overall distance to the entire ensemble. A family of metrics based on the structural hamming distance is defined for the space of DAGs (of a given node set) and is used for aggregation. Under the high-dimensional-low-sample size setting, the graph learned on one data set often has excessive number of false positive edges due to over-fitting of the noise. Aggregation overcomes over-fitting through variance reduction and thus greatly reduces false positives. We also develop an efficient implementation of the hill climbing search algorithm of DAG learning which makes the proposed method computationally competitive for the high-dimensional regime. The DAGBag procedure is implemented in the R package dagbag.
  • Two-qubit system is the foundation of constructing the universal quantum gate. We have studied the two-qubit Rabi model for the general case and its generalizations with dipole, XXX and XYZ Heisenberg qubit-qubit interactions, which are commonly used in quantum computation. Their solutions are presented analytically with eigenstates can be obtained in terms of extended coherent states or Fock states and applied to the construction of the ultrafast two-qubit quantum gate in circuit QED and quantum state storage and transfer. Some novel kinds of quasi-exact solutions are found for specific sets of parameters, causing level crossings within the same parity subspace, which do not appear in the regular spectrum, indicating its non-integrability. These eigenstates are very interesting for quantum computing and single photon experiments because they are formed by just a few Fock states, and in some cases, with at most one photon. They are also easy to prepare, since they exist for all qubit-photon coupling values with constant eigenenergy and the qubit energy splittings can be fine tuned in the experiment in contrast to the coupling.
  • Gaussian Graphical Models (GGMs) have been used to construct genetic regulatory networks where regularization techniques are widely used since the network inference usually falls into a high-dimension-low-sample-size scenario. Yet, finding the right amount of regularization can be challenging, especially in an unsupervised setting where traditional methods such as BIC or cross-validation often do not work well. In this paper, we propose a new method - Bootstrap Inference for Network COnstruction (BINCO) - to infer networks by directly controlling the false discovery rates (FDRs) of the selected edges. This method fits a mixture model for the distribution of edge selection frequencies to estimate the FDRs, where the selection frequencies are calculated via model aggregation. This method is applicable to a wide range of applications beyond network construction. When we applied our proposed method to building a gene regulatory network with microarray expression breast cancer data, we were able to identify high-confidence edges and well-connected hub genes that could potentially play important roles in understanding the underlying biological processes of breast cancer.
  • Algebraic immunity of Boolean function $f$ is defined as the minimal degree of a nonzero $g$ such that $fg=0$ or $(f+1)g=0$. Given a positive even integer $n$, it is found that the weight distribution of any $n$-variable symmetric Boolean function with maximum algebraic immunity $\frac{n}{2}$ is determined by the binary expansion of $n$. Based on the foregoing, all $n$-variable symmetric Boolean functions with maximum algebraic immunity are constructed. The amount is $(2\wt(n)+1)2^{\lfloor \log_2 n \rfloor}$
  • We propose a semiparametric model for autonomous nonlinear dynamical systems and devise an estimation procedure for model fitting. This model incorporates subject-specific effects and can be viewed as a nonlinear semiparametric mixed effects model. We also propose a computationally efficient model selection procedure. We show by simulation studies that the proposed estimation as well as model selection procedures can efficiently handle sparse and noisy measurements. Finally, we apply the proposed method to a plant growth data used to study growth displacement rates within meristems of maize roots under two different experimental conditions.
  • This is a note on logistic regression models and logistic kernel machine models. It contains derivations to some of the expressions in a paper -- SNP Set Analysis for Detecting Disease Association Using Exon Sequence Data -- submitted to BMC proceedings by these authors.
  • We present results of atomistic empirical pseudopotential calculations and configuration interaction for excitons, positive and negative trions (X\pm), positive and negative quartons (X2\pm) and biexcitons. The structure investigated are laterally aligned InGaAs quantum dot molecules embedded in GaAs under a lateral electric field. The rather simple energetic of excitons becomes more complex in the case of charged quasiparticles but remains tractable. The negative trion spectrum shows four anticrossings in the presently available range of fields while the positive trion shows two. The magnitude of the anticrossings reveals many-body effects in the carrier tunneling process that should be experimentally accessible.
  • We study the electronic and optical properties of laterally coupled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot molecules under lateral electric field. We find that electrons perceive the double-dot structure as a compound single object, while the holes discern two well separated dots. Through a combination of predictive atomistic modeling, detailed morphology studies, and single object micro-photoluminescence measurements, we show that this peculiar confinement results in an unusual heterogeneous behavior of electrons and holes with profound consequences on optical properties.
  • In this paper, we study a kernel smoothing approach for denoising a tensor field. Particularly, both simulation studies and theoretical analysis are conducted to understand the effects of the noise structure and the structure of the tensor field on the performance of different smoothers arising from using different metrics, viz., Euclidean, log-Euclidean and affine invariant metrics. We also study the Rician noise model and compare two regression estimators of diffusion tensors based on raw diffusion weighted imaging data at each voxel.
  • In a recent paper (Efron (2004)), Efron pointed out that an important issue in large-scale multiple hypothesis testing is that the null distribution may be unknown and need to be estimated. Consider a Gaussian mixture model, where the null distribution is known to be normal but both null parameters--the mean and the variance--are unknown. We address the problem with a method based on Fourier transformation. The Fourier approach was first studied by Jin and Cai (2007), which focuses on the scenario where any non-null effect has either the same or a larger variance than that of the null effects. In this paper, we review the main ideas in Jin and Cai (2007), and propose a generalized Fourier approach to tackle the problem under another scenario: any non-null effect has a larger mean than that of the null effects, but no constraint is imposed on the variance. This approach and that in \cite{JC} complement with each other: each approach is successful in a wide class of situations where the other fails. Also, we extend the Fourier approach to estimate the proportion of non-null effects. The proposed procedures perform well both in theory and in simulated data.
  • In this paper, we propose a new method remMap -- REgularized Multivariate regression for identifying MAster Predictors -- for fitting multivariate response regression models under the high-dimension-low-sample-size setting. remMap is motivated by investigating the regulatory relationships among different biological molecules based on multiple types of high dimensional genomic data. Particularly, we are interested in studying the influence of DNA copy number alterations on RNA transcript levels. For this purpose, we model the dependence of the RNA expression levels on DNA copy numbers through multivariate linear regressions and utilize proper regularizations to deal with the high dimensionality as well as to incorporate desired network structures. Criteria for selecting the tuning parameters are also discussed. The performance of the proposed method is illustrated through extensive simulation studies. Finally, remMap is applied to a breast cancer study, in which genome wide RNA transcript levels and DNA copy numbers were measured for 172 tumor samples. We identify a tran-hub region in cytoband 17q12-q21, whose amplification influences the RNA expression levels of more than 30 unlinked genes. These findings may lead to a better understanding of breast cancer pathology.