• The Kepler-9 system harbors three known transiting planets. The system holds significant interest for several reasons. First, the outer two planets exhibit a period ratio that is close to a 2:1 orbital commensurability, with attendant dynamical consequences. Second, both planets lie in the planetary mass "desert" that is generally associated with the rapid gas agglomeration phase of the core accretion process. Third, there exist attractive prospects for accurately measuring both the sky-projected stellar spin-orbit angles as well as the mutual orbital inclination between the planets in the system. Following the original \textit{Kepler} detection announcement in 2010, the initially reported orbital ephemerides for Kepler-9~b and c have degraded significantly, due to the limited time base-line of observations on which the discovery of the system rested. Here, we report new ground-based photometric observations and extensive dynamical modeling of the system. These efforts allow us to photometrically recover the transit of Kepler-9~b, and thereby greatly improve the predictions for upcoming transit mid-times. Accurate ephemerides of this system are important in order to confidently schedule follow-up observations of this system, for both in-transit Doppler measurements as well as for atmospheric transmission spectra taken during transit.
  • Starting from an unjammed initial state, applying shear to a granular material of a fixed packing fraction below $\phi_J$, i.e. the isotropic jamming density of frictionless spheres can produce shear jamming states, as have been discovered recently. In addition, it has also been discovered that the system will first experience a bulk fragile state before evolving into a shear jammed state. Due to the existence of friction between the system and the third dimension in the previous studies, it is unclear whether such fragile state would still exist on the route to shear jamming if the friction with the third dimension were completely eliminated and the background noise level were greatly reduced. Using a novel apparatus, we have completely eliminated the friction between particles and the third dimension by floating the particles on the surface of a shallow water layer thus revealing more details of the route of shear-jamming. We are able to measure weak boundary pressure of three orders of magnitude below the resolution of the photo-elastic method through the combination force-gauges of high sensitivity and a cantilever-like simple-beam apparatus. In a system with weak cohesion, we have indeed observed the bulk fragile states before the shear jamming; in addition, we have also discovered the boundary fragile states and regimes of negligible shear modus compared to bulk modulus. Most importantly, we now have a much better understanding of the bulk fragile state: its existence requires an auxiliary in some form, e.g. the weak cohesion in this experiment. By constructing a way to freely tune down the cohesion to more than six orders of magnitude smaller, to our surprise, we have discovered the complete vanishing of the bulk fragile states, which thus allows us to determine the plausible origin of the bulk fragile state.
  • Despite extensive theoretical \cite{GanterPRL1998, ElliotPRL2001,SchirmacherPRL2007, TanakaNatureM2008, MonacoPNAS2009, MarruzzoSCIRP2013} and experimental studies \cite{ChumakovPRL2011, ChumakovPRL2014, KayaScience2010,KChenPRL2010, LXuPRL2012, BonnPreprint2014}, a longstanding puzzle in condensed matter physics remains regarding the origin and nature of "Boson peak" (BP), where the vibrational density of states (DOS) in glasses possesses an excess of states compared with the crystalline counterpart. Here we show that BP is successfully observed in 2D hexagonal granular packing, where the disorder is due to the force network, i.e. the spatial heterogeneity of elasticity \cite{MarruzzoSCIRP2013}. Using photo-elastic techniques \cite{TrushNature2005}, the disordered particle interaction can be precisely measured to resolve the origin and nature of BP for the first time in a real scenario. We discover the structures of DOS of disordered crystals reminiscent of the corresponding perfect crystals, which is consistent with the recent studies in $SiO_2$\cite{ChumakovPRL2014} and in disordered gels\cite{LorenzoGelPaper2011}, notwithstanding the drastically different systems. Moreover, we propose a mechanism to clarify that BP is not merely a broadened and shifted van Hove singularity \cite{ElliotPRL2001, ChumakovPRL2011} but instead it is due to an interplay of the mesoscopic screening effect and the microscopic elasticity disorder -- causing, respectively, the broadening and the attenuation of the first and the second van Hove singularity. This may lead to an in-depth understanding of BP in structure glasses.
  • Promoting cooperation is an intellectual challenge in the social sciences, for which the iterated Prisoners' Dilemma (IPD) is a fundamental framework. The traditional view that there exists no simple ultimatum strategy whereby one player can unilaterally control the share of the surplus has been challenged by a new class of "zero-determinant" (ZD) strategies raised by Press and Dyson. In particular, the extortionate strategies can subdue the opponent and obtain higher scores. However, no empirical evidence has yet been found to support this theoretical finding. In a long-run laboratory experiment of the iterated Prisoners' Dilemma pairing each human subject with a computer co-player, we demonstrate that the extortionate strategy indeed outperforms the generous strategy against human subjects. Our results show that the extortionate strategy achieves higher scores than the generous strategy, the extortionate strategy promotes the cooperation rate to a similar level as the generous strategy does, and the human subjects' cooperation rates in both the extortionate and generous treatments are increasing over time. While our results imply that the human subjects cared about their earnings as well as fairness or reciprocity, we do observe that subjects learned to become increasingly cooperative over time to increase their own monetary payoffs. Our experiments provide the first laboratory evidence in support of the Press-Dyson theory.
  • Let $K_n$ be the complete graph with $n$ vertices and $c_1, c_2, ..., c_r$ be $r$ different colors. Suppose we randomly and uniformly color the edges of $K_n$ in $c_1, c_2, ..., c_r$. Then we get a random graph, denoted by $\mathcal{K}_n^r$. In the paper, we investigate the asymptotic properties of several kinds of monochromatic and heterochromatic subgraphs in $\mathcal{K}_n^r$. Accurate threshold functions in some cases are also obtained.