• Making a "which-way" measurement (WWM) to identify which slit a particle goes through in a double-slit apparatus will reduce the visibility of interference fringes. There has been a long-standing controversy over whether this can be attributed to an uncontrollable momentum transfer. To date, no experiment has characterised the momentum change in a way that relates quantitatively to the loss of visibility. Here, by reconstructing the Bohmian trajectories of single photons, we experimentally obtain the distribution of momentum change, which is observed to be not a momentum kick that occurs at the point of the WWM, but nonclassically accumulates during the propagation of the photons. We further confirm a quantitative relation between the loss of visibility consequent on a WWM and the total (late-time) momentum disturbance. Our results emphasize the role of the Bohmian momentum in giving an intuitive picture of wave-particle duality and complementarity.
  • Self-testing refers to a method with which a classical user can certify the state and measurements of quantum systems in a device-independent way. Especially, the self-testing of entangled states is of great importance in quantum information process. A comprehensible example is that violating the CHSH inequality maximally necessarily implies the bipartite shares a singlet. One essential question in self-testing is that, when one observes a non-maximum violation, how close is the tested state to the target state (which maximally violates certain Bell inequality)? The answer to this question describes the robustness of the used self-testing criterion, which is highly important in a practical sense. Recently, J. Kaniewski predicts two analytic self-testing bounds for bipartite and tripartite systems. In this work, we experimentally investigate these two bounds with high quality two-qubit and three-qubit entanglement sources. The results show that these bounds are valid for various of entangled states we prepared, and thus, we implement robust self-testing processes which improve the previous results significantly.
  • Quantum entanglement is the key resource for quantum information processing. Device-independent certification of entangled states is a long standing open question, which arouses the concept of self-testing. The central aim of self-testing is to certify the state and measurements of quantum systems without any knowledge of their inner workings, even when the used devices cannot be trusted. Specifically, utilizing Bell's theorem, it is possible to place a boundary on the singlet fidelity of entangled qubits. Here, beyond this rough estimation, we experimentally demonstrate a complete self-testing process for various pure bipartite entangled states up to four dimensions, by simply inspecting the correlations of the measurement outcomes. We show that this self-testing process can certify the exact form of entangled states with fidelities higher than 99.9% for all the investigated scenarios, which indicates the superior completeness and robustness of this method. Our work promotes self-testing as a practical tool for developing quantum techniques.
  • Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering describes a quantum nonlocal phenomenon in which one party can nonlocally affect the other's state through local measurements. It reveals an additional concept of quantum nonlocality, which stands between quantum entanglement and Bell nonlocality. Recently, a quantum information task named as subchannel discrimination (SD) provides a necessary and sufficient characterization of EPR steering. The success probability of SD using steerable states is higher than using any unsteerable states, even when they are entangled. However, the detailed construction of such subchannels and the experimental realization of the corresponding task are still technologically challenging. In this work, we designed a feasible collection of subchannels for a quantum channel and experimentally demonstrated the corresponding SD task where the probabilities of correct discrimination are clearly enhanced by exploiting steerable states. Our results provide a concrete example to operationally demonstrate EPR steering and shine a new light on the potential application of EPR steering.
  • Detecting a change point is a crucial task in statistics that has been recently extended to the quantum realm. A source state generator that emits a series of single photons in a default state suffers an alteration at some point and starts to emit photons in a mutated state. The problem consists in identifying the point where the change took place. In this work, we consider a learning agent that applies Bayesian inference on experimental data to solve this problem. This learning machine adjusts the measurement over each photon according to the past experimental results finds the change position in an online fashion. Our results show that the local-detection success probability can be largely improved by using such a machine learning technique. This protocol provides a tool for improvement in many applications where a sequence of identical quantum states is required.
  • Interpretations of quantum mechanics (QM), or proposals for underlying theories, that attempt to present a definite realist picture, such as Bohmian mechanics, require strong non-local effects. Naively, these effects would violate causality and contradict special relativity. However if the theory agrees with QM the violation cannot be observed directly. Here, we demonstrate experimentally such an effect: we steer the velocity and trajectory of a Bohmian particle using a remote measurement. We use a pair of photons and entangle the spatial transverse position of one with the polarization of the other. The first photon is sent to a double-slit-like apparatus, where its trajectory is measured using the technique of Weak Measurements. The other photon is projected to a linear polarization state. The choice of polarization state, and the result, steer the first photon in the most intuitive sense of the word. The effect is indeed shown to be dramatic, while being easy to visualize. We discuss its strength and what are the conditions for it to occur.
  • Photons propagating in Laguerre-Gaussian modes have characteristic orbital angular momentums, which are fundamental optical degrees of freedom. The orbital angular momentum of light has potential application in high capacity optical communication and even in quantum information processing. In this work, we experimentally construct a ring cavity with 4 lenses and 4 mirrors that is completely degenerate for Laguerre-Gaussian modes. By measuring the transmission peaks and patterns of different modes, the ring cavity is shown to supporting more than 31 Laguerre-Gaussian modes. The constructed degenerate cavity opens a new way for using the unlimited resource of available angular momentum states simultaneously.
  • Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering describes the ability of one party to remotely affect another's state through local measurements. One of the most distinguishable properties of EPR steering is its asymmetric aspect. Steering can work in one direction but fail in the opposite direction. This type of one-way steering, which is different from the symmetry concepts of entanglement and Bell nonlocality, has garnered much interest. However, an experimental demonstration of genuine EPR steering in the simplest scenario, i.e., one that employs two-qubit systems, is still lacking. In this work, we experimentally demonstrate one-way EPR steering with multimeasurement settings for a class of two-qubit states, which are still one-way steerable even with infinite settings. The steerability is quantified by the steering radius, which represents a necessary and sufficient steering criterion. The demonstrated one-way steering in the simplest bipartite quantum system is of fundamental interest and may provide potential applications in one-way quantum information tasks.
  • Topological quantum computation aims to employ anyonic quasiparticles with exotic braiding statistics to encode and manipulate quantum information in a fault-tolerant way. Majorana zero modes are experimentally the simplest realisation of anyons that can non-trivially process quantum information. However, their braiding evolutions, necessary for realising topological gates, still remain beyond current technologies. Here we report the experimental encoding of four Majorana zero modes in an all-optical quantum simulator that give rise to a fault-tolerant qubit. We experimentally simulate their braiding and demonstrate both the non-Abelian character and the topological nature of the resulting geometric phase. We realise a full set of topological and non-topological gates that can arbitrarily rotate the encoded qubit. As an application, we implement the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm exclusively by topological gates. Our experiment indicates the intriguing possibility of the experimental simulation of Majorana-based quantum computation with scalable technologies.
  • All-optical photonic devices are crucial for many important photonic technology and applications, ranging from optical communication to quantum information processing. Conventional design of all-optical devices is based on photon propagation and interference in real space, which may reply on large numbers of optical elements and are challenging for precise control. Here we propose a new route for engineering all-optical devices using photon internal degrees of freedom, which form photonic crystals in such synthetic dimensions for photon propagation and interference. We demonstrate this new design concept by showing how important optical devices such as quantum memory and optical filter can be realized using synthetic orbital angular momentum (OAM) lattices in a single main degenerate cavity. The new designing route utilizing synthetic photonic lattices may significantly reduce the requirement for numerous optical elements and their fine tuning in conventional design, paving the way for realistic all-optical photonic devices with novel functionalities.
  • The realization of Majorana zero modes is in the centre of intense theoretical and experimental investigations. Unfortunately, their exchange that can reveal their exotic statistics needs manipulations that are still beyond our experimental capabilities. Here we take an alternative approach. Through the Jordan-Wigner transformation, the Kitaev's chain supporting two Majorana zero modes is mapped to the spin-1/2 chain. We experimentally simulated the spin system and its evolution with a photonic quantum simulator. This allows us to probe the geometric phase, which corresponds to the exchange of two Majorana zero modes positioned at the ends of a three-site chain. Finally, we demonstrate the immunity of quantum information encoded in the Majorana zero modes against local errors through the simulator. Our photonic simulator opens the way for the efficient realization and manipulation of Majorana zero modes in complex architectures.
  • Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering describes the ability of one observer to nonlocally "steer" the other observer's state through local measurements. It exhibits a unique asymmetric property, i.e., the steerability of one observer to steer the other's state could be different from each other, which can even lead to a one-way EPR steering, i.e., only one observer obtains the steerability in the two-observer case. This property is inherently different from the symmetric concepts of entanglement and Bell nonlocality and has been attracted increasing interests. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the asymmetric EPR steering for a class of two-qubit states in the case of two measurement settings. We propose a practical method to quantify the steerability. We then provide a necessary and sufficient condition for EPR steering and clearly show the case of one-way EPR steering. Our work provides a new insight on the fundamental asymmetry of quantum nonlocality and would find potential application in asymmetric quantum information processing.
  • Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light is a fundamental optical degree of freedom that has recently motivated much exciting research in diverse fields ranging from optical communication to quantum information. We show for the first time that it is also a unique and valuable resource for quantum simulation, by demonstrating theoretically how \emph{2d} topological physics can be simulated in a \emph{1d} array of optical cavities using OAM-carrying photons. Remarkably, this newly discovered application of OAM states not only reduces required physical resources but also increases feasible scale of simulation. By showing how important topics such as edge-state transport and topological phase transition can be studied in a small simulator with just a few cavities ready for immediate experimental exploration, we demonstrate the prospect of photonic OAM for quantum simulation which can have a significant impact on the research of topological physics.
  • Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering, a generalization of the original concept of "steering" proposed by Schr\"{o}dinger, describes the ability of one system to nonlocally affect another system's states through local measurements. Some experimental efforts to test EPR steering in terms of inequalities have been made, which usually require many measurement settings. Analogy to the "All-Versus-Nothing" (AVN) proof of Bell's theorem without inequalities, testing steerability without inequalities would be more strong and require less resource. Moreover, the practical meaning of steering implies that it should also be possible to store the state information on the side to be steered, a result that has not yet been experimentally demonstrated. Using a recent AVN criterion for two qubit entangled states, we experimentally implement a practical steering game using quantum memory. Further more, we develop a theoretical method to deal with the noise and finite measurement statistics within the AVN framework and apply it to analyze the experimental data. Our results clearly show the facilitation of the AVN criterion for testing steerability and provide a particularly strong perspective for understanding EPR steering.
  • Here we present the quantum storage of three-dimensional orbital-angular-momentum photonic entanglement in a rare-earth-ion-doped crystal. The properties of the entanglement and the storage process are confirmed by the violation of the Bell-type inequality generalized to three dimensions after storage ($S=2.152\pm0.033$). The fidelity of the memory process is $0.993\pm0.002$, as determined through complete quantum process tomography in three dimensions. An assessment of the visibility of the stored weak coherent pulses in higher-dimensional spaces, demonstrates that the memory is highly reliable for 51 spatial modes. These results pave the way towards the construction of high-dimensional and multiplexed quantum repeaters based on solid-state devices. The multimode capacity of rare-earth-based optical processor goes beyond the temporal and the spectral degree of freedom, which might provide a useful tool for photonic information processing.
  • We experimentally realized a new method for transmitting quantum information reliably through paired optical polarization-maintaining (PM) fibers. The physical setup extends the use of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, where noises are canceled through interference. This method can be viewed as an improved version of the current decohernce-free subspace (DFS) approach in fiber optics. Furthermore, the setup can be applied bidirectionally, which means that robust quantum communication can be achieved from both ends. To rigorously quantify the amount of quantum information transferred, optical fibers are analyzed with the tools developed in quantum communication theory. These results not only suggests a practical means for protecting classical and quantum information through optical fibers, but also provides a new physical platform for enriching the structure of the quantum communication theory.
  • The Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM) captures the key physics in the non-equilibrium dynamics of second-order phase transitions, and accurately predict the density of the topological defects formed in this process. However, despite much effort, the veracity of the central prediction of KZM, i.e., the scaling of the density production and the transit rate, is still an open question. Here, we performed an experiment, based on a nine-stage optical interferometer with an overall fidelity up to 0.975$\pm$0.008, that directly supports the central prediction of KZM in quantum non-equilibrium dynamics. In addition, our work has significantly upgraded the number of stages of the optical interferometer to nine with a high fidelity, this technique can also help to push forward the linear optical quantum simulation and computation.
  • Open quantum systems have attracted great attention, since inevitable coupling between quantum systems and their environment greatly affects the features of interest of these systems. Quantum discord, is a measure of the total nonclassical correlation in a quantum system that includes, but is not exclusive to, the distinct property of quantum entanglement. Quantum discord can exist in separated quantum states and plays an important role in many fundamental physics problems and practical quantum information tasks. There have been numerous investigations on quantum discord and its counterpart classical correlation. This short review focuses on highlighting the system-environment dynamics of two-qubit quantum discord and the influence of initial system-environment correlations on the dynamics of open quantum systems. The external control effect on the dynamics of open quantum systems are involved. Several related experimental works are discussed.
  • The simulation of low-temperature properties of many-body systems remains one of the major challenges in theoretical and experimental quantum information science. We present, and demonstrate experimentally, a universal cooling method which is applicable to any physical system that can be simulated by a quantum computer. This method allows us to distill and eliminate hot components of quantum states, i.e., a quantum Maxwell's demon. The experimental implementation is realized with a quantum-optical network, and the results are in full agreement with theoretical predictions (with fidelity higher than 0.978). These results open a new path for simulating low-temperature properties of physical and chemical systems that are intractable with classical methods.
  • The uncertainty principle, which bounds the uncertainties involved in obtaining precise outcomes for two complementary variables defining a quantum particle, is a crucial aspect in quantum mechanics. Recently, the uncertainty principle in terms of entropy has been extended to the case involving quantum entanglement. With previously obtained quantum information for the particle of interest, the outcomes of both non-commuting observables can be predicted precisely, which greatly generalises the uncertainty relation. Here, we experimentally investigated the entanglement-assisted entropic uncertainty principle for an entirely optical setup. The uncertainty is shown to be near zero in the presence of quasi-maximal entanglement. The new uncertainty relation is further used to witness entanglement. The verified entropic uncertainty relation provides an intriguing perspective in that it implies the uncertainty principle is not only observable-dependent but is also observer-dependent.
  • Despite the great success of quantum mechanics, questions regarding its application still exist and the boundary between quantum and classical mechanics remains unclear. Based on the philosophical assumptions of macrorealism and noninvasive measurability, Leggett and Garg devised a series of inequalities (LG inequalities) involving a single system with a set of measurements at different times. Introduced as the Bell inequalities in time, the violation of LG inequalities excludes the hidden-variable description based on the above two assumptions. We experimentally investigated the single photon LG inequalities under decoherence simulated by birefringent media. These generalized LG inequalities test the evolution trajectory of the photon and are shown to be maximally violated in a coherent evolution process. The violation of LG inequalities becomes weaker with the increase of interaction time in the environment. The ability to violate the LG inequalities can be used to set a boundary of the classical realistic description.
  • We studied the quantum correlation between the photon pairs generated by biexciton cascade decays of self-assembled quantum dots, and determined the temperature behavior associated with so-called sudden change of the quantum correlation. The relationship between the fine structure splitting and the sudden change temperature is also provided. Our study indicates that this correlation behavior sudden change temperature is independent on the back ground noise in the system and far lower than entanglement sudden death temperature, therefore it should be easier to observe the phenomenon of correlation sudden change in experiments than to observe entanglement sudden death.
  • An improvement of the scheme by Brunner and Simon [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 010405 (2010)] is proposed in order to show that quantum weak measurements can provide a method to detect ultrasmall longitudinal phase shifts, even with white light. By performing an analysis in the frequency domain, we find that the amplification effect will work as long as the spectrum is large enough, irrespective of the behavior in the time domain. As such, the previous scheme can be notably simplified for experimental implementations.
  • We experimentally demonstrate the nonlocal reversal of a partial-collapse quantum measurement on two-photon entangled state. Both the partial measurement and the reversal operation are implemented in linear optics with two displaced Sagnac interferometers, which are characterized by single qubit quantum process tomography. The recovered state is measured by quantum state tomography and its nonlocality is characterized by testing the Bell inequality. Our result will be helpful in quantum communication and quantum error correction.
  • By using photon pairs created in parametric down conversion, we report on an experiment, which demonstrates that measurement can recover the quantum entanglement of two qubit system in a pure dephasing environment. The concurrence of the final state with and without measurement are compared and analyzed. Furthermore, we verify that recovered states can still violate Bell's inequality, that is, to say, such recovered states exhibit nonlocality. In the context of quantum entanglement, sudden death and rebirth provide clear evidence, which verifies that entanglement dynamics of the system is sensitive not only to its environment, but also on its initial state.