• Stellar systems composed of single, double, triple or high-order systems are rightfully regarded as the fundamental building blocks of the Milky Way. Binary stars play an important role in formation and evolution of the Galaxy. Through comparing the radial velocity variations from multi-epoch observations, we analyze the binary fraction of dwarf stars observed with the LAMOST. Effects of different model assumptions such as orbital period distributions on the estimate of binary fractions, are investigated. The results based on log-normal distribution of orbital periods reproduce the previous complete analyses better than the power-law distribution. We find that the binary fraction increases with $T_{\rm eff}$ and decreases with [Fe/H]. We first investigate the relation between $\alpha$-elements and binary fraction in such a large sample as the LAMOST. The old stars with high [$\alpha$/Fe] dominate higher binary fraction than young stars with low [$\alpha$/Fe]. At the same mass, former forming stars possess a higher binary fraction than newly forming ones, which may be related with the evolution of the Galaxy.
  • We present the ultraviolet magnitudes for over three million stars in the LAMOST survey, in which 2,202,116 stars are detected by $GALEX$. For 889,235 undetected stars, we develop a method to estimate their upper limit magnitudes. The distribution of (FUV $-$ NUV) shows that the color declines with increasing effective temperature for stars hotter than 7000 K in our sample, while the trend disappears for the cooler stars due to upper atmosphere emission from the regions higher than their photospheres. For stars with valid stellar parameters, we calculate the UV excesses with synthetic model spectra, and find that the (FUV $-$ NUV) vs. $R'_{\mathrm{FUV}}$ can be fitted with a linear relation and late-type dwarfs tend to have high UV excesses. There are 87,178 and 1,498,103 stars detected more than once in the visit exposures of $GALEX$ in the FUV and NUV, respectively. We make use of the quantified photometric errors to determine statistical properties of the UV variation, including intrinsic variability and the structure function on the timescale of days. The overall occurrence of possible false positives is below 1.3\% in our sample. UV absolute magnitudes are calculated for stars with valid parallaxes, which could serve as a possible reference frame in the NUV. We conclude that the colors related to UV provide good criteria to distinguish between M giants and M dwarfs, and the variability of RR Lyrae stars in our sample is stronger than that of other A and F stars.
  • The Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey of the Galactic Anti-center (XSTPS-GAC) is a photometric sky survey that covers nearly 6 000 deg^2 towards Galactic anti-center in g r i bands. Half of its survey field locates on the Galactic Anti-center disk, which makes XSTPS-GAC highly suitable for searching new open clusters in the GAC region. In this paper, we report new open cluster candidates discovered in this survey, as well as properties of these open cluster candidates, such as age, distance and reddening, derived by isochrone fitting in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD). These open cluster candidates are stellar density peaks detected in the star density maps by applying the method from Koposov et al. (2008). Each candidate is inspected on its true color image composed from XSTPS-GAC three band images. Then its CMD is checked, in order to identify whether the central region stars have a clear isochrone-like trend differing from the background stars. The parameters derived from isochrone fitting for these candidates are mainly based on three band photometry of XSTPS-GAC. Meanwhile, when these new candidates are able to be seen clearly on 2MASS, their parameters are also derived based on 2MASS (J-H, J) CMD. Finally, there are 320 known open clusters rediscovered and 24 new open cluster candidates discovered in this work. Further more, the parameters of these new candidates, as well as another 11 known recovered open clusters, are properly determined for the first time.
  • We present spectra of the extreme polar AR Ursae Majoris (AR UMa) which display a clear Al I absorption doublet, alongside spectra taken less than a year earlier in which that feature is not present. Re-examination of earlier SDSS spectra indicates that the Al I absorption doublet was also present $\approx$8 years before our first non-detection. We conclude that this absorbing material is unlikely to be on the surface of either the white dwarf (WD) or the donor star. We suggest that this Al I absorption feature arises in circumstellar material, perhaps produced by the evaporation of asteroids as they approach the hot WD. The presence of any remaining reservoir of rocky material in AR UMa might help to constrain the prior evolution of this unusual binary system. We also apply spectral decomposition to find the stellar parameters of the M dwarf companion, and attempt to dynamically measure the mass of the WD in AR UMa by considering both the radial velocity curves of the H$_\beta$ emission line and the Na I absorption line. Thereby we infer a mass range for the WD in AR UMa of 0.91 $M_{\odot}$ $<$ $M_{\mathrm{WD}}$ $<$ 1.24 $M_{\odot}$.
  • The $Chandra$ archival data is a valuable resource for various studies on different topics of X-ray astronomy. In this paper, we utilize this wealth and present a uniformly processed data set, which can be used to address a wide range of scientific questions. The data analysis procedures are applied to 10,029 ACIS observations, which produces 363,530 source detections, belonging to 217,828 distinct X-ray sources. This number is twice the size of the $Chandra$ Source Catalog (Version 1.1). The catalogs in this paper provide abundant estimates of the detected X-ray source properties, including source positions, counts, colors, fluxes, luminosities, variability statistics, etc. Cross-correlation of these objects with galaxies shows 17,828 sources are located within the $D_{25}$ isophotes of 1110 galaxies, and 7504 sources are located between the $D_{25}$ and 2$D_{25}$ isophotes of 910 galaxies. Contamination analysis with the log$N$--log$S$ relation indicates that 51.3\% of objects within 2$D_{25}$ isophotes are truly relevant to galaxies, and the "net" source fraction increases to 58.9\%, 67.3\%, and 69.1\% for sources with luminosities above $10^{37}$, $10^{38}$, and $10^{39}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Among the possible scientific uses of this catalog, we discuss the possibility to study intra-observation variability, inter-observation variability, and supersoft sources.
  • Optical counterparts can provide significant constraints on the physical nature of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). In this letter, we identify six point sources in the error circle of a ULX in M82, namely M82 X-1, by registering Chandra positions onto Hubble Space Telescope images. Two objects are considered as optical counterpart candidates of M82 X-1, which show F658N flux excess compared to the optical continuum that may suggest the existence of an accretion disk. The spectral energy distributions of the two candidates match well with the spectra for supergiants, with stellar types as F5-G0 and B5-G0, respectively. Deep spatially resolved spectroscopic follow-up and detailed studies are needed to identify the true companion and confirm the properties of this BH system.
  • M82 X-1 is the brightest ultraluminous X-ray source in starburst galaxy M82 and is one of the best intermediate mass black hole candidates. Previous studies based on the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer/Proportional Counter Array (RXTE/PCA) reported a regular X-ray flux modulation of M82 with a period of 62 days, and attributed this periodic modulation to M82 X-1. However, this modulation is not necessarily from M82 X-1 because RXTE/PCA has a very poor spatial resolution of ~1 degree. In this work, we analyzed 1000 days of monitoring data of M82 X-1 from the Swift/X-ray telescope (XRT), which has a much better spatial resolution than RXTE/PCA. The periodicity distribution map of M82 reveals that the 62-day periodicity is most likely not from M82 X-1, but from the summed contributions of several periodic X-ray sources 4 arcsec southeast of M82 X-1. However, Swift/XRT is not able to resolve those periodic sources and locate the precise origin of the periodicity of M82. Thus, more long-term observations with higher spatial resolution are required.