• Spin superfluid is a novel emerging quantum matter arising from the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of spin-1 bosons. We demonstrate the spin superfluid ground state in canted antiferromagnetic Cr2O3 thin film at low temperatures via nonlocal spin transport. A large enhancement of the nonlocal spin signal is observed below ~ 20 K, and it saturates from ~ 5 K down to 2 K. We show that the spins can propagate over very long distances (~ 20 micro meters) in such spin superfluid ground state and the nonlocal spin signal decreases very slowly as the spacing increases with an inverse relationship, which is consistent with theoretical prediction. Furthermore, spin superfluidity has been investigated in the canted antiferromagnetic phase of the (11-20)-oriented Cr2O3 film, where the magnetic field dependence of the associated critical temperature follows a two-thirds power law near the critical point. The experimental demonstration of the spin superfluid ground state in canted antiferromagnet will be extremely important for the fundamental physics on the BEC of spin-1 bosons and paves the way for future spin supercurrent devices, such as spin-Josephson junctions.
  • In this paper, we introduce a novel problem of audio-visual event localization in unconstrained videos. We define an audio-visual event as an event that is both visible and audible in a video segment. We collect an Audio-Visual Event(AVE) dataset to systemically investigate three temporal localization tasks: supervised and weakly-supervised audio-visual event localization, and cross-modality localization. We develop an audio-guided visual attention mechanism to explore audio-visual correlations, propose a dual multimodal residual network (DMRN) to fuse information over the two modalities, and introduce an audio-visual distance learning network to handle the cross-modality localization. Our experiments support the following findings: joint modeling of auditory and visual modalities outperforms independent modeling, the learned attention can capture semantics of sounding objects, temporal alignment is important for audio-visual fusion, the proposed DMRN is effective in fusing audio-visual features, and strong correlations between the two modalities enable cross-modality localization.
  • Magnetic insulators (MIs) attract tremendous interest for spintronic applications due to low Gilbert damping and absence of Ohmic loss. Magnetic order of MIs can be manipulated and even switched by spin-orbit torques (SOTs) generated through spin Hall effect and Rashba-Edelstein effect in heavy metal/MI bilayers. SOTs on MIs are more intriguing than magnetic metals since SOTs cannot be transferred to MIs through direct injection of electron spins. Understanding of SOTs on MIs remains elusive, especially how SOTs scale with the film thickness. Here, we observe the critical role of dimensionality on the SOT efficiency by systematically studying the MI layer thickness dependent SOT efficiency in tungsten/thulium iron garnet (W/TmIG) bilayers. We first show that the TmIG thin film evolves from two-dimensional to three-dimensional magnetic phase transitions as the thickness increases, due to the suppression of long-wavelength thermal fluctuation. Then, we report the significant enhancement of the measured SOT efficiency as the thickness increases. We attribute this effect to the increase of the magnetic moment density in concert with the suppression of thermal fluctuations. At last, we demonstrate the current-induced SOT switching in the W/TmIG bilayers with a TmIG thickness up to 15 nm. The switching current density is comparable with those of heavy metal/ferromagnetic metal cases. Our findings shed light on the understanding of SOTs in MIs, which is important for the future development of ultrathin MI-based low-power spintronics.
  • Quantum anomalous Hall state is expected to emerge in Dirac electron systems such as graphene under both sufficiently strong exchange and spin-orbit interactions. In pristine graphene, neither interaction exists; however, both interactions can be acquired by coupling graphene to a magnetic insulator (MI) as revealed by the anomalous Hall effect. Here, we show enhanced magnetic proximity coupling by sandwiching graphene between a ferrimagnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) which also serves as a top gate dielectric. By sweeping the top-gate voltage, we observe Fermi level-dependent anomalous Hall conductance. As the Dirac point is approached from both electron and hole sides, the anomalous Hall conductance reaches 1/4 of the quantum anomalous Hall conductance 2e2/h. The exchange coupling strength is determined to be as high as 27 meV from the transition temperature of the induced magnetic phase. YIG/graphene/h-BN is an excellent heterostructure for demonstrating proximity-induced interactions in two-dimensional electron systems.
  • The magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG) with a ferrimagnetic transition temperature of $\sim$560 K has been widely used in microwave and spintronic devices. Anomalous features in the spin Seeback effect (SSE) voltages have been observed in Pt/YIG and attributed to the magnon-phonon coupling. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to map out low-energy spin waves and acoustic phonons of YIG at 100 K as a function of increasing magnetic field. By comparing the zero and 9.1 T data, we find that instead of splitting and opening up gaps at the spin wave and acoustic phonon dispersion intersecting points, magnon-phonon coupling in YIG enhances the hybridized scattering intensity. These results are different from expectations of conventional spin-lattice coupling, calling for new paradigms to understand the scattering process of magnon-phonon interactions and the resulting magnon-polarons.
  • The Dzyaloshinskii Moriya Interaction (DMI) at the heavy metal (HM) and ferromagnetic metal (FM) interface has been recognized as a key ingredient in spintronic applications. Here we investigate the chemical trend of DMI on the 5d band filling (5d^3~5d^10) of the HM element in HM/CoFeB/MgO multilayer thin films. DMI is quantitatively evaluated by measuring asymmetric spin wave dispersion using Brillouin light scattering. Sign reversal and 20 times modification of the DMI coefficient D have been measured as the 5d HM element is varied. The chemical trend can be qualitatively understood by considering the 5d and 3d bands alignment at the HM/FM interface and the subsequent orbital hybridization around the Fermi level. Furthermore, a positive correlation is observed between DMI and spin mixing conductance at the HM/FM interfaces. Our results provide new insights into the interfacial DMI for designing future spintronic devices.
  • Despite its extremely weak intrinsic spin-orbit coupling (SOC), graphene has been shown to acquire considerable SOC by proximity coupling with exfoliated transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Here we demonstrate strong induced Rashba SOC in graphene that is proximity coupled to a monolayer TMD film, MoS2 or WSe2, grown by chemical vapor deposition with drastically different Fermi level positions. Graphene/TMD heterostructures are fabricated with a pickup-transfer technique utilizing hexagonal boron nitride, which serves as a flat template to promote intimate contact and therefore a strong interfacial interaction between TMD and graphene as evidenced by quenching of the TMD photoluminescence. We observe strong induced graphene SOC that manifests itself in a pronounced weak anti-localization (WAL) effect in the graphene magnetoconductance. The spin relaxation rate extracted from the WAL analysis varies linearly with the momentum scattering time and is independent of the carrier type. This indicates a dominantly Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation mechanism caused by the induced Rashba SOC. Our analysis yields a Rashba SOC energy of ~1.5 meV in graphene/WSe2 and ~0.9 meV in graphene/MoS2, respectively. The nearly electron-hole symmetric nature of the induced Rashba SOC provides a clue to possible underlying SOC mechanisms.
  • The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) that emerges under broken time-reversal symmetry in topological insulators (TI) exhibits many fascinating physical properties for potential applications in nano-electronics and spintronics. However, in transition-metal doped TI, the only experimentally demonstrated QAHE system to date, the effect is lost at practically relevant temperatures. This constraint is imposed by the relatively low Curie temperature (Tc) and inherent spin disorder associated with the random magnetic dopants. Here we demonstrate drastically enhanced Tc by exchange coupling TI to Tm3Fe5O12, a high-Tc magnetic insulator with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Signatures that the TI surface states acquire robust ferromagnetism are revealed by distinct squared anomalous Hall hysteresis loops at 400 K. Point-contact Andreev reflection spectroscopy confirms that the TI surface is indeed spin-polarized. The greatly enhanced Tc, absence of spin disorder, and perpendicular anisotropy are all essential to the occurrence of the QAHE at high temperatures.
  • Electrical currents in a magnetic insulator/heavy metal heterostructure can induce two simultaneous effects, namely, spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) on the heavy metal side and spin-orbit torques (SOTs) on the magnetic insulator side. Within the framework of the pure spin current model based on the bulk spin Hall effect (SHE), the ratio of the spin Hall-induced anomalous Hall effect (SH-AHE) to SMR should be equal to the ratio of the field-like torque (FLT) to damping-like torque (DLT). We perform a quantitative study of SMR, SH-AHE, and SOTs in a series of thulium iron garnet/platinum or Tm3Fe5O12/Pt heterostructures with different Tm3Fe5O12 thicknesses, where Tm3Fe5O12 is a ferrimagnetic insulator with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We find the ratio between measured effective fields of FLT and DLT is at least 2 times larger than the ratio of the SH-AHE to SMR. In addition, the bulk SHE model grossly underestimates the spin torque efficiency of FLT. Our results reveal deficiencies of the bulk SHE model and also address the importance of interfacial effects such as the Rashba and magnetic proximity effects in magnetic insulator/heavy metal heterostructures.
  • The Rashba physics has been intensively studied in the field of spin orbitronics, for the purpose of searching novel physical properties and the FM magnetization switching for technology applications. Here, we report the observation of the inverse Edelstein effect up to room temperature in the Rashba-split 2DEG between two insulating oxides SrTiO3 and LaAlO3 with the LaAlO3 layer thickness from 3 to 40 unit cells (UC). We further demonstrate that the spin voltage could be dramatically manipulated by electric field effect for the 2DEG between SrTiO3 and 3 UC LaAlO3. These results demonstrate that the Rashba-split 2DEG at the complex oxide interface can be used for room temperature efficient charge-and-spin conversion for the generation and detection of spin current.
  • There has been considerable interest in exploiting the spin degrees of freedom of electrons for potential information storage and computing technologies. Topological insulators (TI), a class of quantum materials, have special gapless edge/surface states, where the spin polarization of the Dirac fermions is locked to the momentum direction. This spin-momentum locking property gives rise to very interesting spin-dependent physical phenomena such as the Edelstein and inverse Edelstein effects. However, the spin injection in pure surface states of TI is very challenging because of the coexistence of the highly conducting bulk states. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the spin injection and observe the inverse Edelstein effect in the surface states of a topological Kondo insulator, SmB6. At low temperatures when only surface carriers are present, a clear spin signal is observed. Furthermore, the magnetic field angle dependence of the spin signal is consistent with spin-momentum locking property of surface states of SmB6.
  • Recently, end-to-end memory networks have shown promising results on Question Answering task, which encode the past facts into an explicit memory and perform reasoning ability by making multiple computational steps on the memory. However, memory networks conduct the reasoning on sentence-level memory to output coarse semantic vectors and do not further take any attention mechanism to focus on words, which may lead to the model lose some detail information, especially when the answers are rare or unknown words. In this paper, we propose a novel Hierarchical Memory Networks, dubbed HMN. First, we encode the past facts into sentence-level memory and word-level memory respectively. Then, (k)-max pooling is exploited following reasoning module on the sentence-level memory to sample the (k) most relevant sentences to a question and feed these sentences into attention mechanism on the word-level memory to focus the words in the selected sentences. Finally, the prediction is jointly learned over the outputs of the sentence-level reasoning module and the word-level attention mechanism. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach successfully conducts answer selection on unknown words and achieves a better performance than memory networks.
  • We demonstrate robust interface strain-induced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in atomically flat ferrimagnetic insulator Tm3Fe5O12 films grown with pulsed laser deposition on substituted-Gd3Ga5O12 substrate which maximizes the tensile strain at the interface. In bilayers consisting of Pt and TIG, we observe large squared Hall hysteresis loops over a wide range of thicknesses of Pt at room temperature. When a thin Cu layer is inserted between Pt and TIG, the Hall hysteresis magnitude decays but stays finite as the thickness of Cu increases up to 5 nm. However, if the Cu layer is placed atop Pt instead, the Hall hysteresis magnitude is consistently larger than when the Cu layer with the same thickness is inserted in between for all Cu thicknesses. These results suggest that both the proximity-induced ferromagnetism and spin current contribute to the anomalous Hall effect.
  • We demonstrate clear weak anti-localization (WAL) effect arising from induced Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in WS$_2$-covered single-layer and bilayer graphene devices. Contrary to the uncovered region of a shared single-layer graphene flake, WAL in WS$_2$-covered graphene occurs over a wide range of carrier densities on both electron and hole sides. At high carrier densities, we estimate the Rashba SOC relaxation rate to be $\sim 0.2 \rm{ps}^{-1}$ and show that it can be tuned by transverse electric fields. In addition to the Rashba SOC, we also predict the existence of a `valley-Zeeman' SOC from first-principles calculations. The interplay between these two SOC's can open a non-topological but interesting gap in graphene; in particular, zigzag boundaries host four sub-gap edge states protected by time-reversal and crystalline symmetries. The graphene/WS$_2$ system provides a possible platform for these novel edge states.
  • We present a synthesis/processing method for fabricating ferrimagnetic insulator (Bi-doped yttrium iron garnet) thin films with tunable magnetic anisotropy. Since the desired magnetic properties rely on controllable thickness and successful doping, we pay attention to the entire synthesis/processing procedure (nanopowder synthesis, nanocrystalline target preparation and pulsed laser deposition (PLD)). Atomically flat films were deposited by PLD on (111)-orientated yttrium aluminum garnet. We show a significant enhancement of perpendicular anisotropy in the films, caused by strain-induced anisotropy. In addition, the perpendicular anisotropy is tunable by decreasing the film thickness and overwhelms the shape anisotropy at a critical thickness of 3.5 nm.
  • Exchange bias is one of the most extensively studied phenomena in magnetism, since it exerts a unidirectional anisotropy to a ferromagnet (FM) when coupled to an antiferromagnet (AFM) and the control of the exchange bias is therefore very important for technological applications, such as magnetic random access memory and giant magnetoresistance sensors. In this letter, we report the crystal structure manipulation of the exchange bias in epitaxial hcp Cr2O3 films. By epitaxially growing twined (10-10) oriented Cr2O3 thin films, of which the c axis and spins of the Cr atoms lie in the film plane, we demonstrate that the exchange bias between Cr2O3 and an adjacent permalloy layer is tuned to in-plane from out-of-plane that has been observed in (0001) oriented Cr2O3 films. This is owing to the collinear exchange coupling between the spins of the Cr atoms and the adjacent FM layer. Such a highly anisotropic exchange bias phenomenon is not possible in polycrystalline films.
  • 30-80 nm thick yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films are grown by pulsed laser deposition on a 5 nm thick sputtered Pt atop gadolinium gallium garnet substrate (GGG) (110). Upon post-growth rapid thermal annealing, single crystal YIG(110) emerges as if it were epitaxially grown on GGG(110) despite the presence of the intermediate Pt film. The YIG surface shows atomic steps with the root-mean-square roughness of 0.12 nm on flat terraces. Both Pt/YIG and GGG/Pt interfaces are atomically sharp. The resulting YIG(110) films show clear in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy with a well-defined easy axis along <001> and a peak-to-peak ferromagnetic resonance linewidth of 7.5 Oe at 9.32 GHz, similar to YIG epitaxilly grown on GGG. Both spin Hall magnetoresistance and longitudinal spin Seebeck effects in the inverted bilayers indicate excellent Pt/YIG interface quality.
  • Spin-momentum locking in protected surface states enables efficient electrical detection of magnon decay at a magnetic-insulator/topological-insulator heterojunction. Here we demonstrate this property using the spin Seebeck effect, i.e. measuring the transverse thermoelectric response to a temperature gradient across a thin film of yttrium iron garnet, an insulating ferrimagnet, and forming a heterojunction with (BixSb1-x)2Te3, a topological insulator. The non-equilibrium magnon population established at the interface can decay in part by interactions of magnons with electrons near the Fermi energy of the topological insulator. When this decay channel is made active by tuning (BixSb1-x)2Te3 to a bulk insulator, a large electromotive force emerges in the direction perpendicular to the in-plane magnetization of yttrium iron garnet. The enhanced, tunable spin Seebeck effect which occurs when the Fermi level lies in the bulk gap offers unique advantages over the usual spin Seebeck effect in metals and therefore opens up exciting possibilities in spintronics.
  • The Gilbert damping of ferromagnetic materials is arguably the most important but least understood phenomenological parameter that dictates real-time magnetization dynamics. Understanding the physical origin of the Gilbert damping is highly relevant to developing future fast switching spintronics devices such as magnetic sensors and magnetic random access memory. Here, we report an experimental study of temperature-dependent Gilbert damping in permalloy (Py) thin films of varying thicknesses by ferromagnetic resonance. From the thickness dependence, two independent contributions to the Gilbert damping are identified, namely bulk damping and surface damping. Of particular interest, bulk damping decreases monotonically as the temperature decreases, while surface damping shows an enhancement peak at the temperature of ~50 K. These results provide an important insight to the physical origin of the Gilbert damping in ultrathin magnetic films.
  • Cr2Ge2Te6 (CGT), a layered ferromagnetic insulator, has attracted a great deal of interest recently owing to its potential for integration with Dirac materials to realize the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) and to develop novel spintronics devices. Here, we study the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy energy of single-crystalline CGT and determine that the magnetic easy axis is directed along the c-axis in its ferromagnetic phase. In addition, CGT is an insulator below the Curie temperature. These properties make CGT a potentially promising candidate substrate for integration with topological insulators for the realization of the high-temperature QAHE.
  • Pure spin current, a flow of spin angular momentum without flow of any companying net charge, is generated in two common ways. One makes use of the spin Hall effect in normal metals (NM) with strong spin-orbit coupling, such as Pt or Ta. The other utilizes the collective motion of magnetic moments or spin waves with the quasi-particle excitations called magnons. A popular material for the latter is yttrium iron garnet, a magnetic insulator (MI). Here we demonstrate in NM/MI/NM trilayers that these two types of spin currents are interconvertible across the interfaces, predicated as the magnon-mediated current drag phenomenon. The transmitted signal scales linearly with the driving current without a threshold and follows the power-law with n ranging from 1.5 to 2.5. Our results indicate that the NM/MI/NM trilayer structure can serve as a scalable pure spin current valve device which is an essential ingredient in spintronics.
  • In this work, we report the growth and functional characterizations of multiferroic TbMnO3 thin films grown on Nb-doped SrTiO3 (001) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. By performing detailed magnetic and ferroelectric properties measurements, we demonstrate that the multiferroicity of spin origin known in the bulk crystals can be successfully transferred to TbMnO3 thin films. Meanwhile, anomalous magnetic transition and unusual magnetoelectric coupling related to Tb moments are observed, suggesting a modified magnetic configuration of Tb in the films as compared to the bulk counterpart. In addition, it is found that the magnetoelectric coupling enabled by Tb moments can even be seen far above the Tb spin ordering temperature, which provides a larger temperature range for the magnetoelectric control involving Tb moments.
  • We investigate spin relaxation in graphene by systematically comparing the roles of spin absorption, other contact-induced effects (e.g. fringe fields, etc.), and bulk spin relaxation for graphene spin valves with MgO barriers, Al2O3 barriers, and transparent contacts. We obtain effective spin lifetimes by fitting the Hanle spin precession data with two models that include or exclude the effect of spin absorption. Results indicate that additional contact-induced spin relaxation other than spin absorption dominates the contact effect. For tunneling contacts, we find reasonable agreement between the two models with median discrepancy of ~20% for MgO and ~10% for Al2O3.
  • We report the experimental demonstration of a magnetologic gate built on graphene at room temperature. This magnetologic gate consists of three ferromagnetic electrodes contacting a single layer graphene spin channel and relies on spin injection and spin transport in the graphene. We utilize electrical bias tuning of spin injection to balance the inputs and achieve "exclusive or" (XOR) logic operation. Furthermore, simulation of the device performance shows that substantial improvement towards spintronic applications can be achieved by optimizing device parameters such as device dimensions. This advance holds promise as a basic building block for spin-based information processing.
  • The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) has been recently demonstrated in Cr- and V-doped three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs) at temperatures below 100 mK. In those materials, the spins of unfilled d-electrons in the transition metal dopants are exchange coupled to develop a long-range ferromagnetic order, which is essential for realizing QAHE. However, the addition of random dopants does not only introduce excess charge carriers that require readjusting the Bi/Sb ratio, but also unavoidably introduces paramagnetic spins that can adversely affect the chiral edge transport in QAHE. In this work, we show a heterostructure approach to independently tune the electronic and magnetic properties of the topological surface states in (BixSb1-x)2Te3 without resorting to random doping of transition metal elements. In heterostructures consisting of a thin (BixSb1-x)2Te3 TI film and yttrium iron garnet (YIG), a high Curie temperature (~ 550 K) magnetic insulator, we find that the TI surface in contact with YIG becomes ferromagnetic via proximity coupling which is revealed by the anomalous Hall effect (AHE). The Curie temperature of the magnetized TI surface ranges from 20 to 150 K but is uncorrelated with the Bi fraction x in (BixSb1-x)2Te3. In contrast, as x is varied, the AHE resistivity scales with the longitudinal resistivity. In this approach, we decouple the electronic properties from the induced ferromagnetism in TI. The independent optimization provides a pathway for realizing QAHE at higher temperatures, which is important for novel spintronic device applications.