• We construct new families of quasimorphisms on many groups acting on CAT(0) cube complexes. These quasimorphisms have a uniformly bounded defect of 12, and they "see" all elements that act hyperbolically on the cube complex. We deduce that all such elements have stable commutator length at least 1/24. The group actions for which these results apply include the standard actions of right-angled Artin groups on their associated CAT(0) cube complexes. In particular, every non-trivial element of a right-angled Artin group has stable commutator length at least 1/24. These results make use of some new tools that we develop for the study of group actions on CAT(0) cube complexes: the essential characteristic set and equivariant Euclidean embeddings.
  • Previously known to form only under high pressure synthetic conditions, here we report that the T'-type 214-structure cuprate based on the rare earth atom Tb is stabilized for ambient pressure synthesis through partial substitution of Pd for Cu. The new material is obtained in purest form for mixtures of nominal composition $Tb_{1.96}Cu_{0.80}Pd_{0.20}O_{4}$. The refined formula, in orthorhombic space group Pbca, with a = 5.5117(1) {\AA}, b = 5.5088(1) {\AA}, and c = 11.8818(1) {\AA}, is $Tb_{2}Cu_{0.83}Pd_{0.17}O_{4}$. An incommensurate structural modulation is seen along the a axis by electron diffraction and high resolution imaging. Magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal long range antiferromagnetic ordering at 7.9 K, with a less pronounced feature at 95 K; a magnetic moment reorientation transition is observed to onset at a field of approximately 1.1 Tesla at 3 K. The material is an n-type semiconductor.
  • We show that in any right-angled Artin group whose defining graph has chromatic number $k$, every non-trivial element has stable commutator length at least $1/(6k)$. Secondly, if the defining graph does not contain triangles, then every non-trivial element has stable commutator length at least $1/20$. These results are obtained via an elementary geometric argument based on earlier work of Culler.
  • This paper concerns statistical inference for the components of a high-dimensional regression parameter despite possible endogeneity of each regressor. Given a first-stage linear model for the endogenous regressors and a second-stage linear model for the dependent variable, we develop a novel adaptation of the parametric one-step update to a generic second-stage estimator. We provide conditions under which the scaled update is asymptotically normal. We then introduce a two-stage Lasso procedure and show that the second-stage Lasso estimator satisfies the aforementioned conditions. Using these results, we construct asymptotically valid confidence intervals for the components of the second-stage regression coefficients. We complement our asymptotic theory with simulation studies, which demonstrate the performance of our method in finite samples.
  • 2H-NbSe2 is the prototype and most frequently studied of the well-known transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) superconductors. Widely acknowledged to be a conventional superconductor, its transition temperature to the superconducting state (Tc) is 7.3 K - a Tc that is substantially higher than those seen for the majority of TMDCs, where Tcs between 2 and 4 K are the norm. Here we report the intercalation of Cu into 2H-NbSe2 to make CuxNbSe2. As is typically found when chemically altering an optimal superconductor, Tc decreases with increasing x, but the way that Tc is suppressed in this case is unusual - an S-shaped character is observed, with an inflection point near x = 0.03 and, at higher x, a leveling off of the Tc near 3 K - down to the usual value for a layered TMDC. Electronic characterization reveals corresponding S-like behavior for many of the materials parameters that influence Tc. To illustrate its character, the superconducting phase diagram for CuxNbSe2 is contrasted to those of FexNbSe2 and NbSe2-xSx.
  • We study the SL(2,R)-infimal lengths of simple closed curves on half-translation surfaces. Our main result is a characterization of Veech surfaces in terms of these lengths. We also revisit the "no small virtual triangles" theorem of Smillie and Weiss and establish the following dichotomy: the virtual triangle area spectrum of a half-translation surface either has a gap above zero or is dense in a neighborhood of zero. These results make use of the auxiliary polygon associated to a curve on a half-translation surface, as introduced by Tang and Webb.
  • Iron-based superconductivity develops near an antiferromagnetic order and out of a bad metal normal state, which has been interpreted as originating from a proximate Mott transition. Whether an actual Mott insulator can be realized in the phase diagram of the iron pnictides remains an open question. Here we use transport, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and neutron scattering to demonstrate that NaFe$_{1-x}$Cu$_x$As near $x\approx 0.5$ exhibits real space Fe and Cu ordering, and are antiferromagnetic insulators with the insulating behavior persisting above the N\'eel temperature, indicative of a Mott insulator. Upon decreasing $x$ from $0.5$, the antiferromagnetic ordered moment continuously decreases, yielding to superconductivity around $x=0.05$. Our discovery of a Mott insulating state in NaFe$_{1-x}$Cu$_x$As thus makes it the only known Fe-based material in which superconductivity can be smoothly connected to the Mott insulating state, highlighting the important role of electron correlations in the high-$T_{\rm c}$ superconductivity.
  • We study the geometry of the Thurston metric on the Teichm\"uller space $\mathcal{T}(S)$ of hyperbolic structures on a surface $S$. Some of our results on the coarse geometry of this metric apply to arbitrary surfaces $S$ of finite type; however, we focus particular attention on the case where the surface is a once-punctured torus, $S_{1,1}$. In that case, our results provide a detailed picture of the infinitesimal, local, and global behavior of the geodesics of the Thurston metric, as well as an analogue of Royden's theorem.
  • High-entropy alloys are made from random mixtures of principal elements on simple lattices, stabilized by a high mixing entropy. The recently discovered BCC Ta-Nb-Hf-Zr-Ti high entropy alloy superconductor appears to display properties of both simple crystalline intermetallics and amorphous materials, e.g. it has a well defined superconducting transition along with an exceptional robustness against disorder. Here we show that the valence-electron count dependence of the superconducting transition temperature in the high entropy alloy falls between those of analogous simple solid solutions and amorphous materials, and test the effect of alloy complexity on the superconductivity. We propose high-entropy alloys as excellent intermediate systems for studying superconductivity as it evolves between crystalline and amorphous materials.
  • We find homogeneous counting quasimorphisms that are effective at seeing chains in a free group F. As corollary, we derive that if a group G has an index-d free subgroup, then every element g in G either has stable commutator length at least 1/8d or some power of g is conjugate to its inverse. We also show that for a finitely-generated free group F, there is a countable basis for the real vector space of homogeneous quasimorphisms on F.
  • In an evolutionary system in which the rules of mutation are local in nature, the number of possible outcomes after $m$ mutations is an exponential function of $m$ but with a rate that depends only on the set of rules and not the size of the original object. We apply this principle to find a uniform upper bound for the growth rate of certain groups including the mapping class group. We also find a uniform upper bound for the growth rate of the number of homotopy classes of triangulations of an oriented surface that can be obtained from a given triangulation using $m$ diagonal flips.
  • We study the geometry of the Thurston metric on Teichmuller space by examining its geodesics and comparing them to Teichmuller geodesics. We show that, similar to a Teichmuller geodesic, the shadow of a Thurston geodesic to the curve graph is a reparametrized quasi-geodesic. However, we show that the set of short curves along the two geodesics are not identical.
  • Exploring small connected and induced subgraph patterns (CIS patterns, or graphlets) has recently attracted considerable attention. Despite recent efforts on computing the number of instances a specific graphlet appears in a large graph (i.e., the total number of CISes isomorphic to the graphlet), little attention has been paid to characterizing a node's graphlet degree, i.e., the number of CISes isomorphic to the graphlet that include the node, which is an important metric for analyzing complex networks such as social and biological networks. Similar to global graphlet counting, it is challenging to compute node graphlet degrees for a large graph due to the combinatorial nature of the problem. Unfortunately, previous methods of computing global graphlet counts are not suited to solve this problem. In this paper we propose sampling methods to estimate node graphlet degrees for undirected and directed graphs, and analyze the error of our estimates. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to study this problem and give a fast scalable solution. We conduct experiments on a variety of real-word datasets that demonstrate that our methods accurately and efficiently estimate node graphlet degrees for graphs with millions of edges.
  • We report that 1T-TiSe2, an archetypical layered transition metal dichalcogenide, becomes superconducting when Ta is substituted for Ti but not when Nb is substituted for Ti. This is unexpected because Nb and Ta should be chemically equivalent electron donors. Superconductivity emerges near x = 0.02 for Ti1-xTaxSe2, while for Ti1-xNbxSe2, no superconducting transitions are observed above 0.4 K. The equivalent chemical nature of the dopants is confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. ARPES and Raman scattering studies show similarities and differences between the two systems, but the fundamental reasons why the Nb and Ta dopants yield such different behavior are unknown. We present a comparison of the electronic phase diagrams of many electron-doped 1T-TiSe2 systems, showing that they behave quite differently, which may have broad implications in the search for new superconductors. We propose that superconducting Ti0.8Ta0.2Se2 will be suitable for devices and other studies based on exfoliated crystal flakes.
  • Counting the frequencies of 3-, 4-, and 5-node undirected motifs (also know as graphlets) is widely used for understanding complex networks such as social and biology networks. However, it is a great challenge to compute these metrics for a large graph due to the intensive computation. Despite recent efforts to count triangles (i.e., 3-node undirected motif counting), little attention has been given to developing scalable tools that can be used to characterize 4- and 5-node motifs. In this paper, we develop computational efficient methods to sample and count 4- and 5- node undirected motifs. Our methods provide unbiased estimators of motif frequencies, and we derive simple and exact formulas for the variances of the estimators. Moreover, our methods are designed to fit vertex centric programming models, so they can be easily applied to current graph computing systems such as Pregel and GraphLab. We conduct experiments on a variety of real-word datasets, and experimental results show that our methods are several orders of magnitude faster than the state-of-the-art methods under the same estimation errors.
  • We introduce and systematically study the concept of a growth tight action. This generalizes growth tightness for word metrics as initiated by Grigorchuk and de la Harpe. Given a finitely generated, non-elementary group $G$ acting on a $G$--space $\mathcal{X}$, we prove that if $G$ contains a strongly contracting element and if $G$ is not too badly distorted in $\mathcal{X}$, then the action of $G$ on $\mathcal{X}$ is a growth tight action. It follows that if $\mathcal{X}$ is a cocompact, relatively hyperbolic $G$--space, then the action of $G$ on $\mathcal{X}$ is a growth tight action. This generalizes all previously known results for growth tightness of cocompact actions: every already known example of a group that admits a growth tight action and has some infinite, infinite index normal subgroups is relatively hyperbolic, and, conversely, relatively hyperbolic groups admit growth tight actions. This also allows us to prove that many CAT(0) groups, including flip-graph-manifold groups and many Right Angled Artin Groups, and snowflake groups admit cocompact, growth tight actions. These provide first examples of non-relatively hyperbolic groups admitting interesting growth tight actions. Our main result applies as well to cusp uniform actions on hyperbolic spaces and to the action of the mapping class group on Teichmueller space with the Teichmueller metric. Towards the proof of our main result, we give equivalent characterizations of strongly contracting elements and produce new examples of group actions with strongly contracting elements.
  • Single-crystalline transition metal films are ideal playing fields for the epitaxial growth of graphene and graphene-base materials. Graphene-silicon layered structures were successfully constructed on Ir(111) thin film on Si substrate with an yttria-stabilized zirconia buffer layer via intercalation approach. Such hetero-layered structures are compatible with current Si-based microelectronic technique, showing high promise for applications in future micro- and nano-electronic devices.
  • A group action on a metric space is called growth tight if the exponential growth rate of the group with respect to the induced pseudo-metric is strictly greater than that of its quotients. A prototypical example is the action of a free group on its Cayley graph with respect to a free generating set. More generally, with Arzhantseva we have shown that group actions with strongly contracting elements are growth tight. Examples of non-growth tight actions are product groups acting on the $L^1$ products of Cayley graphs of the factors. In this paper we consider actions of product groups on product spaces, where each factor group acts with a strongly contracting element on its respective factor space. We show that this action is growth tight with respect to the $L^p$ metric on the product space, for all $1<p\leq \infty$. In particular, the $L^\infty$ metric on a product of Cayley graphs corresponds to a word metric on the product group. This gives the first examples of groups that are growth tight with respect to an action on one of their Cayley graphs and non-growth tight with respect to an action on another, answering a question of Grigorchuk and de la Harpe.
  • Polymorphism in materials often leads to significantly different physical properties - the rutile and anatase polymorphs of TiO2 are a prime example. Polytypism is a special type of polymorphism, occurring in layered materials when the geometry of a repeating structural layer is maintained but the layer stacking sequence of the overall crystal structure can be varied; SiC is an example of a material with many polytypes. Although polymorphs can have radically different physical properties, it is much rarer for polytypism to impact physical properties in a dramatic fashion. Here we study the effects of polytypism and polymorphism on the superconductivity of TaSe2, one of the archetypal members of the large family of layered dichalcogenides. We show that it is possible to access 2 stable polytypes and 2 stable polymorphs in the TaSe2-xTex solid solution, and find that the 3R polytype shows a superconducting transition temperature that is nearly 17 times higher than that of the much more commonly found 2H polytype. The reason for this dramatic change is not apparent, but we propose that it arises either from a remarkable dependence of Tc on subtle differences in the characteristics of the single layers present, or from a surprising effect of the layer stacking sequence on electronic properties that instead are expected to be dominated by the properties of a single layer in materials of this kind.
  • We demonstrate by high resolution low temperature electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) measurements that the long range ferromagnetic (FM) order in vanadium (V)-doped topological insulator Sb$_2$Te$_3$ has the nature of van Vleck-type ferromagnetism. The positions and the relative amplitudes of two core-level peaks (L$_3$ and L$_2$) of the V EELS spectrum show unambiguous change when the sample is cooled from room temperature to T=10K. Magnetotransport and comparison of the measured and simulated EELS spectra confirm that these changes originate from onset of FM order. Crystal field analysis indicates that in V-doped Sb$_2$Te$_3$, partially filled core states contribute to the FM order. Since van Vleck magnetism is a result of summing over all states, this magnetization of core level verifies the van Vleck-type ferromagnetism in a direct manner.
  • Electronic-liquid-crystal phases, in which part of the spatial symmetries are broken spontaneously, are considered to play a vital role in interpreting the structure-property relation in strongly-correlated materials. Although electronic-liquid-crystal phases have been inferred in studies of a wide range of materials, the nature of the transition between such phases has received little experimental attention. Here we report the direct observation of an electronic smectic-nematic phase transition in a doped manganite utilizing transmission electron microscopic techniques. We show that, in this case, the transition from the smectic to the nematic phase is driven by two mechanisms: the proliferation of dislocations and the development of mesoscale charge inhomogeneity. We observe the development of dislocation pairs within the commensurate smectic phase on approaching the transition (at 210 +/- 10 K) from below. Above the transition, the incommensurate nematic phase is accompanied by mesoscopic electronic phase separation.
  • Magnetoresistance is the change of a material's electrical resistance in response to an applied magnetic field. In addition to its intrinsic scientific interest, it is a technologically important property, placing it in "Pasteur's quadrant" of research value: materials with large magnetorsistance have found use as magnetic sensors 1, in magnetic memory 2, hard drives 3, transistors 4, and are the subject of frequent study in the field of spintronics 5, 6. Here we report the observation of an extremely large one-dimensional positive magnetoresistance (XMR) in the layered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) WTe2; 452,700 percent at 4.5 Kelvin in a magnetic field of 14.7 Tesla, and 2.5 million percent at 0.4 Kelvin in 45 Tesla, with no saturation. The XMR is highly anisotropic, maximized in the crystallographic direction where small pockets of holes and electrons are found in the electronic structure. The determination of the origin of this effect and the fabrication of nanostructures and devices based on the XMR of WTe2 will represent a significant new direction in the study and uses of magnetoresistivity. *The published version of the paper includes co-authors Tian Liang and Max Hirschberger. **This paper has been published with new MR data to 60T where the MR of WTe2 reaches 13 million percent (at 0.5K) and still shows no signs of saturation. We also have new electron diffraction patterns to lower temperature (10K). We discuss the possible origin of the MR as coming from an electron-hole 'resonance' condition established by a perfect n/p ratio of 1 (more details in a new "extended data" section). This makes WTe2, possibly, the first realization of a perfectly balanced semimetal. ***The paper is published as "Large non-saturating magnetoresistance in WTe2" in Nature (2014), DOI:10.1038/nature13763
  • Monodispersed strontium titanate nanoparticles were prepared and studied in detail. It is found that ~10 nm as-prepared stoichiometric nanoparticles are in a polar structural state (with possibly ferroelectric properties) over a broad temperature range. A tetragonal structure, with possible reduction of the electronic hybridization is found as the particle size is reduced. In the 10 nm particles, no change in the local Ti-off centering is seen between 20 and 300 K. The results indicate that nanoscale motifs of SrTiO3 may be utilized in data storage as assembled nano-particle arrays in applications where chemical stability, temperature stability and low toxicity are critical issues.
  • Cr$_2$B displays temperature independent paramagnetism. We induce ferromagnetism by replacing less than $3\,\%$ of the Cr atoms by Fe. By the lowest Fe doping level made, Curie-Weiss behavior is observed; $\Theta_{CW}$ changes from $-20\,$K for $0.5\,\%$ Fe-doped Cr$_2$B to positive values of about 50 K by $5\,\%$ Fe doping. The ferromagnetic T$_C$ is 8 K for $2.5\,\%$ Fe doping and increases linearly to 46 K by $5\,\%$ doping; we infer that a quantum phase transition occurs near the $2.0\,\%$ Fe level. Magnetic fluctuations at the intermediate doping levels are reflected in the linear resistance and an anomalous heat capacity at low temperatures. Imaging and chemical analysis down to the atomic scale show that the Fe dopant is randomly distributed.
  • We describe a detailed study of the structural, magnetic, and magneto-transport properties of single-crystal, n-type, Mn-doped Bi2Te3 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. With increasing Mn concentration, the crystal structure changes from the tetradymite structure of the Bi2Te3 parent crystal at low Mn concentrations towards a BiTe phase in the (Bi2Te3)m(Bi2)n homologous series. Magnetization measurements reveal the onset of ferromagnetism with a Curie temperature in the range 13.8 K - 17 K in films with 2 % - 10 % Mn concentration. Magnetization hysteresis loops reveal that the magnetic easy axis is along the c-axis of the crystal (perpendicular to the plane). Polarized neutron reflectivity measurements of a 68 nm-thick sample show that the magnetization is uniform through the film. The presence of ferromagnetism is also manifest in a strong anomalous Hall effect and a hysteretic magnetoresistance arising from domain wall scattering. Ordinary Hall effect measurements show that the carrier density is n-type, increases with Mn doping, and is high enough (> 2.8 x 10^{13} cm^{-2}) to place the chemical potential in the conduction band. Thus, the observed ferromagnetism is likely associated with both bulk and surface states. Surprisingly, the Curie temperature does not show any clear dependence on the carrier density but does increase with Mn concentration. Our results suggest that the ferromagnetism probed in these Mn-doped Bi2Te3 films is not mediated by carriers in the conduction band or in an impurity band.