• We use a 200 $h^{-1}Mpc$ a side N-body simulation to study the mass accretion history (MAH) of dark matter halos to be accreted by larger halos, which we call infall halos. We define a quantity $a_{\rm nf}\equiv (1+z_{\rm f})/(1+z_{\rm peak})$ to characterize the MAH of infall halos, where $z_{\rm peak}$ and $z_{\rm f}$ are the accretion and formation redshifts, respectively. We find that, at given $z_{\rm peak}$, their MAH is bimodal. Infall halos are dominated by a young population at high redshift and by an old population at low redshift. For the young population, the $a_{\rm nf}$ distribution is narrow and peaks at about $1.2$, independent of $z_{\rm peak}$, while for the old population, the peak position and width of the $a_{\rm nf}$ distribution both increases with decreasing $z_{\rm peak}$ and are both larger than those of the young population. This bimodal distribution is found to be closely connected to the two phases in the MAHs of halos. While members of the young population are still in the fast accretion phase at $z_{\rm peak}$, those of the old population have already entered the slow accretion phase at $z_{\rm peak}$. This bimodal distribution is not found for the whole halo population, nor is it seen in halo merger trees generated with the extended Press-Schechter formalism. The infall halo population at $z_{\rm peak}$ are, on average, younger than the whole halo population of similar masses identified at the same redshift. We discuss the implications of our findings in connection to the bimodal color distribution of observed galaxies and to the link between central and satellite galaxies.
  • The simplest analyses of halo bias assume that halo mass alone determines halo clustering. However, if the large scale environment is fixed, then halo clustering is almost entirely determined by environment, and is almost completely independent of halo mass. We show why. Our analysis is useful for studies which use the environmental dependence of clustering to constrain cosmological and galaxy formation models. It also shows why many correlations between galaxy properties and environment are merely consequences of the underlying correlations between halos and their environments, and provides a framework for quantifying such inherited correlations.
  • We investigate the origin, the shape, the scatter, and the cosmic evolution in the observed relationship between specific angular momentum $j_\star$ and the stellar mass $M_\star$ in early-type (ETGs) and late-type galaxies (LTGs). Specifically, we exploit the observed star-formation efficiency and chemical abundance to infer the fraction $f_{\rm inf}$ of baryons that infall toward the central regions of galaxies where star formation can occur. We find $f_{\rm inf}\approx 1$ for LTGs and $\approx 0.4$ for ETGs with an uncertainty of about $0.25$ dex, consistent with a biased collapse. By comparing with the locally observed $j_\star$ vs. $M_\star$ relations for LTGs and ETGs we estimate the fraction $f_j$ of the initial specific angular momentum associated to the infalling gas that is retained in the stellar component: for LTGs we find $f_j\approx 1.11^{+0.75}_{-0.44}$, in line with the classic disc formation picture; for ETGs we infer $f_j\approx 0.64^{+0.20}_{-0.16}$, that can be traced back to a $z<1$ evolution via dry mergers. We also show that the observed scatter in the $j_{\star}$ vs. $M_{\star}$ relation for both galaxy types is mainly contributed by the intrinsic dispersion in the spin parameters of the host dark matter halo. The biased collapse plus mergers scenario implies that the specific angular momentum in the stellar components of ETG progenitors at $z\sim 2$ is already close to the local values, in pleasing agreement with observations. All in all, we argue such a behavior to be imprinted by nature and not nurtured substantially by the environment.
  • Although extensive experimental and theoretical works have been conducted to understand the ballistic and diffusive phonon transport in nanomaterials recently, direct observation of temperature and thermal nonequilibrium of different phonon modes has not been realized. Herein, we have developed a method within the framework of molecular dynamics to calculate the temperatures of phonon in both real and phase spaces. Taking silicon thin film and graphene as examples, we directly obtained the spectral phonon temperature (SPT) and observed the local thermal nonequilibrium between the ballistic and diffusive phonons. Such nonequilibrium also generally exists across interfaces and is surprisingly large, and it provides an additional thermal interfacial resistance mechanism. Our SPT results directly show that the vertical thermal transport across the dimensionally mismatched graphene/substrate interface is through the coupling between flexural acoustic phonons of graphene and the longitudinal phonons in the substrate with mode conversion. In the dimensionally matched interfaces, e.g. graphene/graphene junction and graphene/boron nitride planar interfaces, strong coupling occurs between the acoustic phonon modes on both sides, and the coupling decreases with interfacial mixing. The SPT method together with the spectral heat flux can eliminate the size effect of the thermal conductivity prediction induced from ballistic transport. Our work shows that in thin films and across interfaces, phonons are in local thermal nonequilibrium.
  • A method we developed recently for the reconstruction of the initial density field in the nearby Universe is applied to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. A high-resolution N-body constrained simulation (CS) of the reconstructed initial condition, with $3072^3$ particles evolved in a 500 Mpc/h box, is carried out and analyzed in terms of the statistical properties of the final density field and its relation with the distribution of SDSS galaxies. We find that the statistical properties of the cosmic web and the halo populations are accurately reproduced in the CS. The galaxy density field is strongly correlated with the CS density field, with a bias that depend on both galaxy luminosity and color. Our further investigations show that the CS provides robust quantities describing the environments within which the observed galaxies and galaxy systems reside. Cosmic variance is greatly reduced in the CS so that the statistical uncertainties can be controlled effectively even for samples of small volumes.
  • Large scale tidal field estimated directly from the distribution of dark matter halos is used to investigate how halo shapes and spin vectors are aligned with the cosmic web. The major, intermediate and minor axes of halos are aligned with the corresponding tidal axes, and halo spin axes tend to be parallel with the intermediate axes and perpendicular to the major axes of tidal field. The strengths of these alignments generally increase with halo mass and redshift, but the dependencies are only through the peak height, {\nu}. The scaling relations of the alignment strengths with the value of {\nu} indicate that the alignment strengths remain roughly constant when the structures within which the halos reside are still in quasi-linear regime, but decreases as nonlinear evolution becomes more important. We also calculate the alignments in projection so that our results can be compared directly with observations. Finally, we investigate the alignments of tidal tensors on large scales, and use the results to understand alignments of halo pairs separated at various distances. Our results suggest coherent structure of the tidal field is the underlying reason for the alignments of halos and galaxies seen in numerical simulations and in observations.
  • We study how halo intrinsic dynamical properties are linked to their formation processes for halos in two mass ranges, $10^{12}-10^{12.5}h^{-1}{\rm M_\odot}$ and $\ge 10^{13}h^{-1}{\rm M_\odot}$, and how both are correlated with the large scale tidal field within which the halos reside at present. Halo merger trees obtained from cosmological $N$-body simulations are used to identify infall halos that are about to merge with their hosts. We find that the tangential component of the infall velocity increases significantly with the strength of the local tidal field, but no strong correlation is found for the radial component. These results can be used to explain how the internal velocity anisotropy and spin of halos depend on environment. The position vectors and velocities of infall halos are aligned with the principal axes of the local tidal field, and the alignment depends on the strength of the tidal field. Opposite accretion patterns are found in weak and strong tidal fields, in the sense that in a weak field the accretion flow is dominated by radial motion within the local structure, while a large tangential component is present in a strong field. These findings can be used to understand the strong alignments we find between the principal axes of the internal velocity ellipsoids of halos and the local tidal field, and their dependence on the strength of tidal field. They also explain why halo spin increases with the strength of local tidal field, but only in weak tidal fields does the spin-tidal field alignment follow the prediction of the tidal torque theory. We discuss how our results may be used to understand the spins of disk galaxies and velocity structures of elliptical galaxies and their correlations with large-scale structure.
  • The development of multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a significant contribution in improving the numerical behavior, revealing the math and physics mechanism and extending the application of LBM. However, some of the MRT schemes proposed previously are not physically-consistent. In this work, we take D2Q9 as a example to show how to derive physically-consistent MRT-LBM schemes by eigenvalue decomposition of the collision operator. In addition, the scheme is validated by the equivalence to Navier-Stokes equations and numerical simulations.