• We report the first detection of the host galaxy of a strong 2175 \AA$ $ dust absorber at z = 2.12 towards the background quasar SDSS J121143.42+083349.7 using HST/WFC3 IR F140W direct imaging and G141 grism spectroscopy. The spectroscopically confirmed host galaxy is located at a small impact parameter of ~ 5.5 kpc (~ 0.65$''$). The F140W image reveals a disk-like morphology with an effective radius of 2.24 $\pm$ 0.08 kpc. The extracted 1D spectrum is dominated by a continuum with weak emission lines ([O\III] and [O\II]). The [O\III]-based unobscured star formation rate (SFR) is 9.4 $\pm$ 2.6 M$_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$ assuming an [O\III]/H$\alpha$ ratio of 1. The moderate 4000 \AA$ $ break (Dn(4000) index $\sim$ 1.3) and Balmer absorption lines indicate that the host galaxy contains an evolved stellar population with an estimated stellar mass M$_*$ of (3 - 7) $\times$ 10$^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$. The SFR and M$_*$ of the host galaxy are comparable to, though slightly lower than, those of typical emission-selected galaxies at $z$ $\sim$ 2. As inferred from our absorption analysis in Ma et al. (2015, 2017, 2018), the host galaxy is confirmed to be a chemically-enriched, evolved, massive, and star-forming disk-like galaxy that is likely in the transition from a blue star-forming galaxy to a red quiescent galaxy.
  • We investigate the infrared contribution from supermassive black hole activity versus host galaxy emission in the mid to far-infrared (IR) spectrum for a large sample of X-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) residing in dusty, star-forming host galaxies. We select 703 AGN with L_X = 10^42-46 ergs s^-1 at 0.1 < z < 5 from the Chandra XBootes X-ray Survey with rich multi-band observations in the optical to far-IR, including a required detection in the Spitzer MIPS 24 um band and at least one in a Herschel far-IR band. This is the largest sample to date of X-ray AGN with mid- and far-IR detections that uses spectral energy distribution (SED) decomposition to determine intrinsic AGN and host galaxy infrared luminosities. We observe weak or nonexistent relationships when averaging star-formation luminosities in bins of AGN luminosities, but see stronger positive trends when averaging L_X in bins of star-forming luminosity for AGN at low redshifts. We determine an average dust covering factor of 33%, corresponding to a Type 2 population of roughly a third. We see no strong connection between AGN fractions in the IR and corresponding total infrared, 24 um, or X-ray luminosities. The average rest-frame AGN contribution as a function of IR wavelength shows significant (~80%) contributions in the mid-IR that trail off at lambda > 30 um. Additionally, we provide an equation relating L_X and pure AGN IR output for high-z AGN allowing future studies to estimate AGN infrared contribution using only X-ray flux density estimates.
  • We present the cold neutral content (H I and C I gas) of 13 quasar 2175 \AA$ $ dust absorbers (2DAs) at $z$ = 1.6 - 2.5 to investigate the correlation between the presence of the UV extinction bump with other physical characteristics. These 2DAs were initially selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Surveys I - III and followed up with the Keck-II telescope and the Multiple Mirror Telescope as detailed in our Paper I. We perform a correlation analysis between metallicity, redshift, depletion level, velocity width, and explore relationships between 2DAs and other absorption line systems. The 2DAs on average have higher metallicity, higher depletion levels, and larger velocity widths than Damped Lyman-$\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs) or subDLAs. The correlation between [Zn/H] and [Fe/Zn] or [Zn/H] and log$\Delta$V$_{90}$ can be used as alternative stellar mass estimators based on the well-established mass-metallicity relation. The estimated stellar masses of the 2DAs in this sample are in the range of $\sim$ 10$^9$ to $\sim$2 $\times$ 10$^{11}$ $M_{\odot}$ with a median value of $\sim$2 $\times$ 10$^{10}$ $M_{\odot}$. The relationship with other quasar absorption line systems can be described as (1) 2DAs are a subset of Mg II and Fe II absorbers, (2) 2DAs are preferentially metal-strong DLAs/subDLAs, (3) More importantly, all of the 2DAs show C I detections with logN(C I) $>$ 14.0 cm$^{-2}$, (4) 2DAs can be used as molecular gas tracers. Their host galaxies are likely to be chemically enriched, evolved, massive (more massive than typical DLA/subDLA galaxies), and presumably star-forming galaxies.
  • We present 13 new 2175 {\AA} dust absorbers at z_abs = 1.0 - 2.2 towards background quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These absorbers are examined in detail using data from the Echelle Spectrograph and Imager (ESI) on the Keck II telescope. Many low-ionization lines including Fe II, Zn II, Mg II, Si II, Al II, Ni II, Mn II, Cr II, Ti II, and Ca II are present in the same absorber which gives rise to the 2175 {\AA} bump. The relative metal abundances (with respect to Zn) demonstrate that the depletion patterns of our 2175 {\AA} dust absorbers resemble that of the Milky Way clouds although some are disk-like and some are halo-like. The 2175 {\AA} dust absorbers have significantly higher depletion levels compared to literature Damped Lyman-{\alpha} absorbers (DLAs) and subDLAs. The dust depletion level indicator [Fe/Zn] tends to anti-correlate with bump strengths. The velocity profiles from the Keck/ESI spectra also provide kinematical information on the dust absorbers. The dust absorbers are found to have multiple velocity components with velocity widths extending from ~100 to ~ 600 km/s, which are larger than those of most DLAs and subDLAs. Assuming the velocity width is a reliable tracer of stellar mass, the host galaxies of 2175 {\AA} dust absorbers are expected to be more massive than DLA/subDLA hosts. Not all of the 2175 {\AA} dust absorbers are intervening systems towards background quasars. The absorbers towards quasars J1006+1538 and J1047+3423 are proximate systems that could be associated with the quasar itself or the host galaxy.
  • We present Chandra ACIS-S and ATCA radio continuum observations of the strongly lensed dusty, star-forming galaxy SPT-S J034640-5204.9 (hereafter SPT0346-52) at $z$ = 5.656. This galaxy has also been observed with ALMA, HST, Spitzer, Herschel, APEX, and the VLT. Previous observations indicate that if the infrared (IR) emission is driven by star formation, then the inferred lensing-corrected star formation rate ($\sim$ 4500 $M_{\sun}$ yr$^{-1}$) and star formation rate surface density $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ ($\sim$ 2000 $M_{\sun} {yr^{-1}} {kpc^{-2}}$) are both exceptionally high. It remained unclear from the previous data, however, whether a central active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributes appreciably to the IR luminosity. The {\it Chandra} upper limit shows that SPT0346-52 is consistent with being star-formation dominated in the X-ray, and any AGN contribution to the IR emission is negligible. The ATCA radio continuum upper limits are also consistent with the FIR-to-radio correlation for star-forming galaxies with no indication of an additional AGN contribution. The observed prodigious intrinsic IR luminosity of (3.6 $\pm$ 0.3) $\times$ 10$^{13}$ $L_{\sun}$ originates almost solely from vigorous star formation activity. With an intrinsic source size of 0.61 $\pm$ 0.03 kpc, SPT0346-52 is confirmed to have one of the highest $\Sigma_{SFR}$ of any known galaxy. This high $\Sigma_{SFR}$, which approaches the Eddington limit for a radiation pressure supported starburst, may be explained by a combination of very high star formation efficiency and gas fraction.
  • We have collected near-infrared to X-ray data of 20 multi-epoch heavily reddened SDSS quasars to investigate the physical mechanism of reddening. Of these, J2317+0005 is found to be a UV cutoff quasar. Its continuum, which usually appears normal, decreases by a factor 3.5 at 3000{\AA}, compared to its more typical bright state during an interval of 23 days. During this sudden continuum cut-off, the broad emission line fluxes do not change, perhaps due to the large size of the Broad Line Region (BLR), r > 23 / (1+z) days. The UV continuum may have suffered a dramatic drop out. However, there are some difficulties with this explanation. Another possibility is that the intrinsic continuum did not change, but was temporarily blocked out, at least towards our line of sight. As indicated by X-ray observations, the continuum rapidly recovers after 42 days. A comparison of the bright state and dim states would imply an eclipse by a dusty cloud with a reddening curve having a remarkably sharp rise shortward of 3500{\AA}. Under the assumption of being eclipsed by a Keplerian dusty cloud, we characterized the cloud size with our observations, however, which is a little smaller than the 3000\AA\ continuum-emitting size inferred from accretion disk models. Therefore, we speculate this is due to a rapid outflow or inflow with a dusty cloud passing through our line-of-sight to the center.
  • The South Pole Telescope has discovered one hundred gravitationally lensed, high-redshift, dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs). We present 0.5" resolution 870um Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array imaging of a sample of 47 DSFGs spanning z=1.9-5.7, and construct gravitational lens models of these sources. Our visibility-based lens modeling incorporates several sources of residual interferometric calibration uncertainty, allowing us to properly account for noise in the observations. At least 70% of the sources are strongly lensed by foreground galaxies (mu_870um > 2), with a median magnification mu_870um = 6.3, extending to mu_870um > 30. We compare the intrinsic size distribution of the strongly lensed sources to a similar number of unlensed DSFGs and find no significant differences in spite of a bias between the magnification and intrinsic source size. This may indicate that the true size distribution of DSFGs is relatively narrow. We use the source sizes to constrain the wavelength at which the dust optical depth is unity and find this wavelength to be correlated with the dust temperature. This correlation leads to discrepancies in dust mass estimates of a factor of 2 compared to estimates using a single value for this wavelength. We investigate the relationship between the [CII] line and the far-infrared luminosity and find that the same correlation between the [CII]L_FIR ratio and Sigma_FIR found for low-redshift star-forming galaxies applies to high-redshift galaxies and extends at least two orders of magnitude higher in Sigma_FIR. This lends further credence to the claim that the compactness of the IR-emitting region is the controlling parameter in establishing the "[CII] deficit."
  • We present Keck/ESI long-slit spectroscopy of SBS 1421+511, a system consisting of a quasar at z = 0.276 and an extended source 3" northern to the quasar. The quasar shows a blue-skewed profile of Balmer broad emission lines, which can be well modeled as emissions from a circular disk with a blueshift velocity of ~1400 km/s. The blueshift is better interpreted as resulting from a recoiling active black hole than from a super-massive black hole binary, since the line profile almost kept steady over one decade in the quasar rest-frame. Alternative interpretations are possible as well, such as emissions from a bipolar outflow or a circular disk with spiral emissivity perturbations. The extended source shows Seyfert-like narrow line ratios and a [OIII] luminosity of >1.4\times10^8L_\odot, with almost the same redshift as the quasar and a projected distance of 12.5 kpc at the redshift. SBS 1421+511 is thus likely to be an interacting galaxy pair with dual AGN. Alternatively, the quasar companion only appears to be active but not necessarily so: the gas before/in/behind the companion galaxy is illuminated by the quasar as an extended emission line region is detected at a similar distance in the opposite direction southern to the quasar, which may be generated either by tidal interactions between the galaxy pair or large-scale outflows from the quasar.
  • The pervasive interstellar dust grains provide significant insights to understand the formation and evolution of the stars, planetary systems, and the galaxies, and may harbor the building blocks of life. One of the most effective way to analyze the dust is via their interaction with the light from background sources. The observed extinction curves and spectral features carry the size and composition information of dust. The broad absorption bump at 2175 Angstrom is the most prominent feature in the extinction curves. Traditionally, statistical methods are applied to detect the existence of the absorption bump. These methods require heavy preprocessing and the co-existence of other reference features to alleviate the influence from the noises. In this paper, we apply Deep Learning techniques to detect the broad absorption bump. We demonstrate the key steps for training the selected models and their results. The success of Deep Learning based method inspires us to generalize a common methodology for broader science discovery problems. We present our on-going work to build the DeepDis system for such kind of applications.
  • To understand cosmic mass assembly in the Universe at early epochs, we primarily rely on measurements of stellar mass and star formation rate of distant galaxies. In this paper, we present stellar masses and star formation rates of six high-redshift ($2.8\leq z \leq 5.7$) dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) that are strongly gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxies. These sources were first discovered by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at millimeter wavelengths and all have spectroscopic redshifts and robust lens models derived from ALMA observations. We have conducted follow-up observations, obtaining multi-wavelength imaging data, using {\it HST}, {\it Spitzer}, {\it Herschel} and the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX). We use the high-resolution {\it HST}/WFC3 images to disentangle the background source from the foreground lens in {\it Spitzer}/IRAC data. The detections and upper limits provide important constraints on the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for these DSFGs, yielding stellar masses, IR luminosities, and star formation rates (SFRs). The SED fits of six SPT sources show that the intrinsic stellar masses span a range more than one order of magnitude with a median value $\sim$ 5 $\times 10^{10}M_{\Sun}$. The intrinsic IR luminosities range from 4$\times 10^{12}L_{\Sun}$ to 4$\times 10^{13}L_{\Sun}$. They all have prodigious intrinsic star formation rates of 510 to 4800 $M_{\Sun} {\rm yr}^{-1}$. Compared to the star-forming main sequence (MS), these six DSFGs have specific SFRs that all lie above the MS, including two galaxies that are a factor of 10 higher than the MS. Our results suggest that we are witnessing the ongoing strong starburst events which may be driven by major mergers.
  • We report the detection of a strong Milky Way-type 2175 \AA$ $ extinction bump at $z$ = 2.1166 in the quasar spectrum towards SDSS J121143.42+083349.7 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 10. We conduct follow up observations with the Echelle Spectrograph and Imager (ESI) onboard the Keck-II telescope and the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) on the VLT. This 2175 \AA$ $ absorber is remarkable in that we simultaneously detect neutral carbon (C I), neutral chlorine (Cl I), and carbon monoxide (CO). It also qualifies as a damped Lyman alpha system. The J1211+0833 absorber is found to be metal-rich and has a dust depletion pattern resembling that of the Milky Way disk clouds. We use the column densities of the C I fine structure states and the C II/C I ratio (under the assumption of ionization equilibrium) to derive the temperature and volume density in the absorbing gas. A Cloudy photoionization model is constructed, which utilizes additional atoms/ions to constrain the physical conditions. The inferred physical conditions are consistent with a canonical cold (T $\sim$ 100 K) neutral medium with a high density ($n$(H I) $\sim$ 100 cm$^{-3}$) and a slightly higher pressure than the local interstellar medium. Given the simultaneous presence of C I, CO, and the 2175 \AA$ $ bump, combined with the high metallicity, high dust depletion level and overall low ionization state of the gas, the absorber towards J1211+0833 supports the scenario that the presence of the bump requires an evolved stellar population.
  • We report the discovery of excess broad band absorption near 2250 A (EBBA) in the spectra of seven broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. By comparing with the statistical results from the control quasar sample, the significance for the detections are all above the > 4{\sigma} level, with five above > 5{\sigma}. The detections have also been verified by several other independent methods. The EBBAs present broader and weaker bumps at smaller wavenumbers than the Milky Way, and similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud. The EBBA bump may be related to the 2175 A bump seen in the Local Group and may be a counterpart of the 2175 A bump under different conditions in the early Universe. Furthermore, five objects in this sample show low-ionization broad absorption lines (LoBALs), such as Mg II and Al III, in addition to the high-ionization broad absorption lines (HiBALs) of C IV and Si IV. The fraction of LoBALs in our sample, ~70%, is surprisingly high compared to that of general BAL quasars, ~10%. Although the origin of the bump is still not clear, the coexistence of both BALs and bumps and the significantly high fraction of LoBALs may indicate the bump carriers is closely related to the early evolution phase of quasars.