• It is known that cosmic magnetic field, if present, can generate anisotropic stress in the plasma and hence, can act as a source of gravitational waves. On the other hand, cosmic magnetic can be generated even at very temperature, much above electroweak scale, due to the gravitational anomaly. Such magnetic field, in its due course of evolution, generates instability in the chiral plasma. In this article, we discuss the generation of gravitational waves due to turbulence in the chiral plasma sourced by the magnetic field created due to the gravitational anomaly. Such a gravitational wave will have unique spectrum. We estimate the amplitude and frequency of such gravitational waves which may be detected in the Pulsar Timing Array (PTA) or Square Kilometer Array (SKA) experiments.
  • Self interacting dark matter (SIDM) provides us with a consistent solution to certain astrophysical observations in conflict with collision-less cold DM paradigm. In this work we estimate the shear viscosity $(\eta)$ and bulk viscosity $(\zeta)$ of SIDM, within kinetic theory formalism, for galactic and cluster size SIDM halos. To that extent we make use of the recent constraints on SIDM crossections for the dwarf galaxies, LSB galaxies and clusters. We also estimate the change in solution of Einstein's equation due to these viscous effects and find that $\sigma/m$ constraints on SIDM from astrophysical data provide us with sufficient viscosity to account for the observed cosmic acceleration at present epoch, without the need of any additional dark energy component. Using the estimates of dark matter density for galactic and cluster size halo we find that the mean free path of dark matter $\sim$ few Mpc. Thus the smallest scale at which the viscous effect start playing the role is cluster scale. Astrophysical data for dwarf, LSB galaxies and clusters also seems to suggest the same. The entire analysis is independent of any specific particle physics motivated model for SIDM.
  • Collective modes of an anisotropic hot QCD medium have been studied within the semi-classical transport theory employing Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) collisional kernel. The modeling of the isotropic medium is primarily based on a recent quasi-particle description of hot QCD equation of state where the medium effects have been encoded in effective gluon and quark/anti-quark momentum distributions that posses non-trivial energy dispersions. The anisotropic distribution functions are obtained in a straightforward the way by stretching or squeezing the isotropic ones along one of the directions. The gluon self-energy is computed using these distribution functions in a linearized transport equation with Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) collisional kernel. Further, the tensor decomposition of gluon self-energy leads to the structure functions which eventually controls the dispersion relations and the collective mode structure of the medium. It has been seen that both the medium effects and collisions induce appreciable modifications to the collective modes and plasma excitations in the hot QCD medium.
  • We consider plasma consisting of electrons and ions in presence of a background neutrino gas and develop the magneto hydrodynamic equations for the system. We show that electron neutrino interaction can induce vorticity in the plasma even in the absence of any electromagnetic perturbations if the background neutrino density is left-right asymmetric. This induced vorticity support a new kind of Alfv\'en wave whose velocity depends on both the external magnetic field and on the neutrino asymmetry. The normal mode analysis show that in the presence of neutrino background the Alfv\'en waves can have different velocities. We also discuss our results in the context of dense astrophysical plasma such as magnetars and show that the difference in the Alfv\'en velocities can be used to explain the observed pulsar kick. We discuss also the relativistic generalization of electron fluid in presence of asymmetric neutrino background.
  • Compact stars such as neutron stars and black holes are gravitationally bound many body systems. We investigate the importance of short and long range part of gravity for such systems. From our analysis, we conclude that the true essence of gravity lies with the long range nature of the interaction. At the end we show how these arguments in the manybody theory consistently leads to Dvali-Gomez picture of a black holes as a collective bound state of long wavelength gravitons.
  • We study the generation and evolution of magnetic field in the presence of chiral imbalance and gravitational anomaly which gives an additional contribution to the vortical current. The contribution due to gravitational anomaly is proportional to $T^2$ which can generate a seed magnetic field irrespective of plasma being hirally charged or neutral. We estimate the order of magnitude of the magnetic field to be $10^{30}$~G at $T\sim 10^9$ GeV, with a typical length scale of the order of $10^{-18}$ cm, which is much smaller than the Hubble radius at that temperature ($10^{-8}$ cm). Moreover, such a system possesses scaling symmetry. We show that the $T^2$ term in the vorticity current along with scaling symmetry leads to more power transfer from lower to higher length scale as compared to only chiral anomaly without scaling symmetry.
  • Recent studies of the hot QCD matter indicate that the bulk viscosity ($\zeta$) of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) rises sharply near the critical point of the QCD phase transition. In this work, we show that such a sharp rise of the bulk viscosity will lead to an effective negative pressure near the critical temperature, $T_{c}$ which in turn drives the Universe to inflate. This inflation has a natural graceful exist when the viscous effect evanesce. We estimate that, depending upon the peak value of $\zeta$, universe expands by a factor of $10$ to $80$ times in a very short span ($\Delta t\sim 10^{-8}$ seconds). Another important outcome of the bulk viscosity dominated dynamics is the cavitation of QGP around $T \sim 1.5T_{c}$. This would lead to the phenomenon of formation of cavitation bubbles within the QGP phase. The above scenario is independent of the order of QCD phase transition. We delineate some of the important cosmological consequences of the inflation and the cavitation.
  • We study the generation of magnetic field in the primordial plasma of the standard model (SM) particles at temperature $T>80$~TeV much higher than the electroweak scale. It is assumed that there is an excess number of right-handed electrons over left-handed positrons in the plasma. Using the Berry-curvature modified kinetic theory to incorporate the effect of the Abelian anomaly, we show that this chiral-imbalance leads to generation of hyper-magnetic field in the plasma in both the collision dominated and the collisionless regimes. It is shown that in the collision dominated regime the chiral-vorticity effect can generate finite vorticity in the plasma together with the magnetic field. Typical strength of the generated magnetic field is $10^{27}$~Gauss at $T\sim 80$~TeV with the length scale $10^5/T$ whereas the Hubble length scale is $10^{13}/T$. Further the instability can also generate the magnetic field of order $10^{31}$~Gauss at typical length scale $10/T$. But there may not be any vorticity generation in this regime. We show that the estimated values of the magnetic field are consistent with the bounds obtained from present observations.
  • We consider the generation and evolution of magnetic field in a primordial plasma at temperature T < 1 MeV in presence of asymmetric neutrino background i.e. the number densities of right- handed and left-handed neutrinos are not same. Semi-classical equations of motion of a charged fermion are derived using the effective low-energy Lagrangian. It is shown that the spin degree of freedom of the charged fermion couples with the neutrino background. Using this kinetic equation we study the collective modes of the plasma. We find that there exist an unstable mode. This instability is closely related with the instability induced by chiral-anomaly in high temperature T > 80 TeV plasma where right and left-handed electrons are out of equilibrium. We find that at the temperatures below the neutrino decoupling the instability can produce magnetic field of 10 Gauss in the Universe. We discuss cosmological implications of the results.
  • It is well known that the difference between the chemical potentials of left-handed and right-handed particles in a parity violating (chiral) plasma can lead to an instability. We show that the chiral instability may drive turbulent transport. Further we estimate the anomalous viscosity of chiral plasma arising from the enhanced collisionality due to turbulence.
  • We reexamine generation of the primordial magnetic fields, at temperature $T>80$TeV, by applying a consistent kinetic theory framework which is suitably modified to take the quantum anomaly into account. The modified kinetic equation can reproduce the known quantum field theoretic results upto the leading orders. We show that our results qualitatively matches with the earlier results obtained using heuristic arguments. The modified kinetic theory can give the instabilities responsible for generation of the magnetic field due to chiral imbalance in two distinct regimes: a) when the collisions play a dominant role and b) when the primordial plasma can be regarded as collisionless. We argue that the instability developing in the collisional regime can dominate over the instability in the collisionless regime.
  • Using the Berry-curvature modified kinetic equation we study instabilities in anisotropic chiral plasmas. It is demonstrated that even for a very small value of anisotropic parameter the chiral-imbalance instability is strongly modified. The instability is enhanced when the modes propagates in the direction parallel to the anisotropy vector and it is strongly suppressed when the modes propagate in the perpendicular direction. Further the instabilities in the jet-plasma system is also investigated. For the case when the modes are propagating in direction parallel to the stream velocity we find that there exist a new branch of the dispersion relation arising due to the parity odd effects. We also show that the parity-odd interaction can enhance the streaming instability.
  • Formalism to calculate the hydrodynamic fluctuations by applying the Onsager theory to the relativistic Navier-Stokes equation is already known. In this work, we calculate hydrodynamic-fluctuations within the framework of the second order hydrodynamics of M\"{u}ller, Israel and Stewart and its generalization to the third order. We have also calculated the fluctuations for several other causal hydrodynamical equations. We show that the form for the Onsager-coefficients and form of the correlation-functions remains same as those obtained by the relativistic Navier-Stokes equation and it does not depend on any specific model of hydrodynamics. Further we numerically investigate evolution of the correlation function using the one dimensional boost-invariant (Bjorken) flow. We compare the correlation functions obtained using the causal hydrodynamics with the correlation-function for the relativistic Navier-Stokes equation. We find that the qualitative behavior of the correlation-functions remain same for all the models of the causal hydrodynamics.
  • We consider first order perturbation theory for a non-minimally coupled inflaton field without assuming an adiabatic equation of state. In general perturbations in non-minimally coupled theory may be non-adiabatic. However under the slow-roll assumptions the perturbation theory may look like adiabatic one. We show in the frame-work of perturbation theory, that our results of spectral index and bound on no-minimal coupling parameter agree with the results obtained using the adiabatic equation of state by the earlier authors.
  • We study the dynamics of ELKO in the context of accelerated phase of our universe. To avoid the fine tuning problem associated with the initial conditions, it is required that the dynamical equations lead to an early-time attractor. In the earlier works, it was shown that the dynamical equations containing ELKO fields do not lead to early-time stable fixed points. In this work, using redefinition of variables, we show that ELKO cosmology admits early-time stable fixed points. More interestingly, we show that ELKO cosmology admit two sets of attractor points corresponding to slow and fast-roll inflation. The fast-roll inflation attractor point is unqiue for ELKO as it is independent of the form of the potential. We also discuss the plausible choice of interaction terms in these two sets of attractor points and constraints on the coupling constant.
  • We study evolution of quark-gluon matter in the ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions within the frame work of relativistic second-order viscous hydrodynamics. In particular, by using the various prescriptions of a temperature-dependent shear viscosity to the entropy ratio, we show that the hydrodynamic description of the relativistic fluid become invalid due to the phenomenon of cavitation. For most of the initial conditions relevant for LHC, the cavitation sets in very early during the evolution of the hydrodynamics in time $\lesssim 2 $fm/c. The cavitation in this case is entirely driven by the large values of shear viscosity. Moreover we also demonstrate that the conformal term used in equations of the relativistic dissipative hydrodynamic can influence the cavitation time.
  • We investigate the possibility of the inflation driven by a Lorentz invariant non-standard spinor field. As these spinors are having dominant interaction via gravitational field only, they are considered as \emph{Dark Spinors}. We study how these dark-spinors can drive the inflation and investigate the cosmological (scalar) perturbations generated by them. Though the dark-spinors obey a Klein-Gordon like equation, the underlying theory of the cosmological perturbations is far more complex than the theories which are using a canonical scalar field. For example the sound speed of the perturbations is not a constant but varies with time. We find that in order to explain the observed value of the spectral-index $n_s$ one must have upper bound on the values of the background NSS-field. The tensor to scalar ratio remains as small as that in the case of canonical scalar field driven inflation because the correction to tensor spectrum due to NSS is required to be very small. In addition we discuss the relationship of results with previous results obtained by using the Lorentz invariance violating theories.
  • It is argued that the short time scale phenomena can be studied within the framework of hydrodynamics in the quark-gluon plasma. There are two different versions of the hydrodynamic-like equations in the literature. In this work we discuss the possible relationship between these versions. In particular we show that if the colour charges associated with the velocity and density matrices in the matrix version of hydrodynamics are same then both the versions of the hydrodynamics become identical.
  • We study the \textit{non-ideal} effects arising due to viscosity (both bulk and shear), equation of state ($\epsilon\neq 3P$) and cavitation on thermal dilepton production from QGP at RHIC energies. We calculate the first order corrections to the dilepton production rates due to shear and bulk viscosities. Ignoring the cavitation can lead to a wrong estimation of dilepton spectra. We show that the shear viscosity can enhance the thermal dilepton spectra whereas the bulk viscosity can suppress it. We present the combined effect of bulk and shear viscosities on the dilepton spectra.
  • We investigate the thermal photon production-rates using one dimensional boost-invariant second order relativistic hydrodynamics to find proper time evolution of the energy density and the temperature. The effect of bulk-viscosity and non-ideal equation of state are taken into account in a manner consistent with recent lattice QCD estimates. It is shown that the \textit{non-ideal} gas equation of state i.e $\epsilon-3\,P\,\neq 0$ behaviour of the expanding plasma, which is important near the phase-transition point, can significantly slow down the hydrodynamic expansion and thereby increase the photon production-rates. Inclusion of the bulk viscosity may also have similar effect on the hydrodynamic evolution. However the effect of bulk viscosity is shown to be significantly lower than the \textit{non-ideal} gas equation of state. We also analyze the interesting phenomenon of bulk viscosity induced cavitation making the hydrodynamical description invalid. We include the viscous corrections to the distribution functions while calculating the photon spectra. It is shown that ignoring the cavitation phenomenon can lead to erroneous estimation of the photon flux.
  • We investigate the thermal photon production-rates using one dimensional boost-invariant second order relativistic hydrodynamics to find proper time evolution of the energy density and the temperature. The effect of bulk-viscosity and non-ideal equation of state are taken into account in a manner consistent with recent lattice QCD estimates. It is shown that the \textit{non-ideal} gas equation of state i.e $\epsilon-3 P \neq 0$ behaviour of the expanding plasma, which is important near the phase-transition point, can significantly slow down the hydrodynamic expansion and thereby increase the photon production-rates. Inclusion of the bulk viscosity may also have similar effect on the hydrodynamic evolution. However the effect of bulk viscosity is shown to be significantly lower than the \textit{non-ideal} gas equation of state. We also analyze the interesting phenomenon of bulk viscosity induced cavitation making the hydrodynamical description invalid. It is shown that ignoring the cavitiation phenomenon can lead to a very significant over estimation of the photon flux. It is argued that this feature could be relevant in studying signature of cavitation in relativistic heavy ion collisions.
  • Superfluid condensation of neutrinos of cosmological origin at a low enough temperature can provide simple and elegant solution to the problems of neutrino oscillations and the accelerated expansion of the universe. It would give rise to a late time cosmological constant of small magnitude and also generate tiny Majorana masses for the neutrinos as observed from their flavor oscillations. We show that carefully prepared beta decay experiments in the laboratory would carry signatures of such a condensation, and thus, it would be possible to either establish or rule out neutrino condensation of cosmological scale in laboratory experiments.
  • We study the properties of a star made of self-gravitating bosons gas in a mean-field approximation. A generalized set of Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov(TOV) equations is derived to incorporate the effect of chemical-potential in the general relativistic frame work. The metric-dependence of the chemical-potential gives a new class of solutions for the boson stars. It is demonstrated that the maximum mass and radius of the star change in a significant way when the effect of finite chemical-potential is considered. We also discuss the case of a boson star made of quark-condensates. It is found that when the self-interaction between the condensates is small as compared to their mass, the typical density is too high to form a diquark-boson star. Our results indicate that the star of quark-condensate may be formed in a low-density and high-pressure regime.
  • We propose a new solution to the origin of dark energy. We suggest that it was created dynamically from the condensate of a singlet neutrino at a late epoch of the early Universe through its effective self interaction. This singlet neutrino is also the Dirac partner of one of the three observed neutrinos, hence dark energy is related to neutrino mass. The onset of this condensate formation in the early Universe is also related to matter density and offers an explanation of the coincidence problem of why dark energy (70%) and total matter (30%) are comparable at the present time. We demonstrate this idea in a model of neutrino mass with (right-handed) singlet neutrinos and a singlet scalar.
  • We studied a left-right symmetric model that can accommodate the neutrino dark energy (\nd) proposal. Type III seesaw mechanism is implemented to give masses to the neutrinos. After explaining the model, we study the consistency of the model by minimizing the scalar potential and obtaining the conditions for the required vacuum expectation values of the different scalar fields. This model is then embedded in an SO(10) grand unified theory and the allowed symmetry breaking scales are determined by the condition of the gauge coupling unification. Although $SU(2)_{R}$ breaking is required to be high, its Abelian subgroup $U(1)_{R}$ is broken in the TeV range, which can then give the required neutrino masses and predicts new gauge bosons that could be detected at LHC. The neutrino masses are studied in details in this model, which shows that at least 3 singlet fermions are required.