• We study projected underdensities in the cosmic galaxy density field known as 'troughs', and their overdense counterparts, which we call 'ridges'. We identify these regions using a bright sample of foreground galaxies from the photometric Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS), specifically selected to mimic the spectroscopic Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey (GAMA). From an independent sample of KiDS background galaxies, we measure the weak gravitational lensing profiles of the troughs/ridges. We quantify their lensing strength $A$ as a function of galaxy density percentile rank $P$ and overdensity $\delta$, and find that the skewness in the galaxy density distribution is reflected in the total mass distribution measured by weak lensing. We interpret our results using the mock galaxy catalogue from the Marenostrum Institut de Ci\`encies de l'Espai (MICE) Grand Challenge lightcone simulation, and find a good agreement with our observations. Using signal-to-noise weights derived from the Scinet LIghtCone Simulations (SLICS) mock catalogue we optimally stack the lensing signal of KiDS troughs with an angular radius $\theta_A$ = {5,10,15,20} arcmin, resulting in {16.8,14.9,10.13,7.55} $\sigma$ detections. Finally, we select troughs using a volume-limited sample of galaxies, split into two redshift bins between 0.1 < z < 0.3. For troughs/ridges with transverse comoving radius $R_A$ = 1.9 Mpc/h, we find no significant difference between the comoving $A'(P)$ and $A'(\delta)$ relation of the low- and high-redshift sample. Using the MICE and SLICS mocks we predict that trough and ridge evolution could be detected with gravitational lensing using deeper and wider lensing surveys, such as those from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and Euclid.
  • We present cosmological parameter constraints from a joint analysis of three cosmological probes: the tomographic cosmic shear signal in $\sim$450 deg$^2$ of data from the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), the galaxy-matter cross-correlation signal of galaxies from the Galaxies And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey determined with KiDS weak lensing, and the angular correlation function of the same GAMA galaxies. We use fast power spectrum estimators that are based on simple integrals over the real-space correlation functions, and show that they are practically unbiased over relevant angular frequency ranges. We test our full pipeline on numerical simulations that are tailored to KiDS and retrieve the input cosmology. By fitting different combinations of power spectra, we demonstrate that the three probes are internally consistent. For all probes combined, we obtain $S_8\equiv \sigma_8 \sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3}=0.800_{-0.027}^{+0.029}$, consistent with Planck and the fiducial KiDS-450 cosmic shear correlation function results. Marginalising over wide priors on the mean of the tomographic redshift distributions yields consistent results for $S_8$ with an increase of $28\%$ in the error. The combination of probes results in a $26\%$ reduction in uncertainties of $S_8$ over using the cosmic shear power spectra alone. The main gain from these additional probes comes through their constraining power on nuisance parameters, such as the galaxy intrinsic alignment amplitude or potential shifts in the redshift distributions, which are up to a factor of two better constrained compared to using cosmic shear alone, demonstrating the value of large-scale structure probe combination.
  • We study the distribution of dark matter in the nonlinear regime in a model in which the primordial fluctuations include, in addition to the dominant primordial Gaussian fluctuations generated by the standard $\Lambda CDM$ cosmological model, the effects of a cosmic string wake set up at the time of equal matter and radiation, making use of cosmological $N$-body simulations. At early times the string wake leads to a planar overdensity of dark matter. We study how this non-Gaussian pattern of a cosmic string wake evolves in the presence of the Gaussian perturbations, making use of wavelet and ridgelet-like statistics specifically designed to extract string wake signals. At late times the Gaussian fluctuations disrupt the string wake. We find that for a string tension of $G \mu = 10^{-7}$, a value just below the current observational limit, the effects of a string wake can be identified in the dark matter distribution, using the current level of the statistical analysis, down to a redshift of $z = 10$.
  • We compute the spherical-sky weak-lensing power spectrum of the shear and convergence. We discuss various approximations, such as flat-sky, and first- and second- order Limber equations for the projection. We find that the impact of adopting these approximations is negligible when constraining cosmological parameters from current weak lensing surveys. This is demonstrated using data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). We find that the reported tension with Planck Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature anisotropy results cannot be alleviated. For future large-scale surveys with unprecedented precision, we show that the spherical second-order Limber approximation will provide sufficient accuracy. In this case, the cosmic-shear power spectrum is shown to be in agreement with the full projection at the sub-percent level for l > 3, with the corresponding errors an order of magnitude below cosmic variance for all l. When computing the two-point shear correlation function, we show that the flat-sky fast Hankel transformation results in errors below two percent compared to the full spherical transformation. In the spirit of reproducible research, our numerical implementation of all approximations and the full projection are publicly available within the package nicaea at http://www.cosmostat.org/software/nicaea.
  • Recent studies have presented evidence for tension between the constraints on Omega_m and sigma_8 from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and measurements of large-scale structure (LSS). This tension can potentially be resolved by appealing to extensions of the standard model of cosmology and/or untreated systematic errors in the modelling of LSS, of which baryonic physics has been frequently suggested. We revisit this tension using, for the first time, carefully-calibrated cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, which thus capture the back reaction of the baryons on the total matter distribution. We have extended the BAHAMAS simulations to include a treatment of massive neutrinos, which currently represents the best motivated extension to the standard model. We make synthetic thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, weak galaxy lensing, and CMB lensing maps and compare to observed auto- and cross-power spectra from a wide range of recent observational surveys. We conclude that: i) in general there is tension between the primary CMB and LSS when adopting the standard model with minimal neutrino mass; ii) after calibrating feedback processes to match the gas fractions of clusters, the remaining uncertainties in the baryonic physics modelling are insufficient to reconcile this tension; and iii) if one accounts for internal tensions in the Planck CMB dataset (by allowing the lensing amplitude, A_Lens, to vary), invoking a non-minimal neutrino mass, typically of 0.2-0.4 eV, can resolve the tension. This solution is fully consistent with separate constraints from the primary CMB and baryon acoustic oscillations.
  • We derive the essentials of the skewed weak lensing likelihood via a simple Hierarchical Model. Our likelihood passes four objective and cosmology-independent tests which a standard Gaussian likelihood fails. We demonstrate that sound weak lensing analyses are naturally biased low, and this does not indicate any new physics such as deviations from $\Lambda$CDM. Mathematically, the biases arise because noisy two-point functions follow skewed distributions. This form of bias is already known from CMB analyses, where the low multipoles have asymmetric error bars. Weak lensing is more strongly affected by this asymmetry as galaxies form a discrete set of shear tracer particles, in contrast to a smooth shear field. We demonstrate that the biases can be up to 30 percent of the standard deviation per data point, dependent on the properties of the weak lensing survey. Our likelihood provides a versatile framework with which to address this bias in future weak lensing analyses.
  • This paper is the first of a series of papers constraining cosmological parameters with weak lensing peak statistics using $\sim 450~\rm deg^2$ of imaging data from the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS-450). We measure high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR: $\nu$) weak lensing convergence peaks in the range of $3<\nu<5$, and employ theoretical models to derive expected values. These models are validated using a suite of simulations. We take into account two major systematic effects, the boost factor and the effect of baryons on the mass-concentration relation of dark matter haloes. In addition, we investigate the impacts of other potential astrophysical systematics including the projection effects of large scale structures, intrinsic galaxy alignments, as well as residual measurement uncertainties in the shear and redshift calibration. Assuming a flat $\Lambda$CDM model, we find constraints for $S_{\rm 8}=\sigma_{\rm 8}(\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3)^{0.5}=0.746^{+0.046}_{-0.107}$ according to the degeneracy direction of the cosmic shear analysis and $\Sigma_{\rm 8}=\sigma_{\rm 8}(\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3)^{0.38}=0.696^{+0.048}_{-0.050}$ based on the derived degeneracy direction of our high-SNR peak statistics. The difference between the power index of $S_{\rm 8}$ and in $\Sigma_{\rm 8}$ indicates that combining the two probes has the potential to break the degeneracy in $\sigma_{\rm 8}$ and $\Omega_{\rm m}$. Our results are consistent with the cosmic shear tomographic correlation analysis of the same dataset and $\sim 2\sigma$ lower than the Planck 2016 results.
  • We study the statistics of peaks in a weak lensing reconstructed mass map of the first 450 square degrees of the Kilo Degree Survey. The map is computed with aperture masses directly applied to the shear field with an NFW-like compensated filter. We compare the peak statistics in the observations with that of simulations for various cosmologies to constrain the cosmological parameter $S_8 = \sigma_8 \sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3}$, which probes the ($\Omega_{\rm m}, \sigma_8$) plane perpendicularly to its main degeneracy. We estimate $S_8=0.750\pm0.059$, using peaks in the signal-to-noise range $0 \leq {\rm S/N} \leq 4$, and accounting for various systematics, such as multiplicative shear bias, mean redshift bias, baryon feedback, intrinsic alignment, and shear-position coupling. These constraints are $\sim25\%$ tighter than the constraints from the high significance peaks alone ($3 \leq {\rm S/N} \leq 4$) which typically trace single-massive halos. This demonstrates the gain of information from low-S/N peaks which correspond to the projection of several small-mass halos along the line-of-sight. Our results are in good agreement with the tomographic shear two-point correlation function measurement in KiDS-450. Combining shear peaks with non-tomographic measurements of the shear two-point correlation functions yields an $\sim20\%$ improvement in the uncertainty on $S_8$ compared to the shear two-point correlation functions alone, highlighting the great potential of peaks as a cosmological probe.
  • Constraining neutrino mass remains an elusive challenge in modern physics. Precision measurements are expected from several upcoming cosmological probes of large-scale structure. Achieving this goal relies on an equal level of precision from theoretical predictions of neutrino clustering. Numerical simulations of the non-linear evolution of cold dark matter and neutrinos play a pivotal role in this process. We incorporate neutrinos into the cosmological N-body code CUBEP3M and discuss the challenges associated with pushing to the extreme scales demanded by the neutrino problem. We highlight code optimizations made to exploit modern high performance computing architectures and present a novel method of data compression that reduces the phase-space particle footprint from 24 bytes in single precision to roughly 9 bytes. We scale the neutrino problem to the Tianhe-2 supercomputer and provide details of our production run, named TianNu, which uses 86% of the machine (13,824 compute nodes). With a total of 2.97 trillion particles, TianNu is currently the world's largest cosmological N-body simulation and improves upon previous neutrino simulations by two orders of magnitude in scale. We finish with a discussion of the unanticipated computational challenges that were encountered during the TianNu runtime.
  • We perform a combined analysis of cosmic shear tomography, galaxy-galaxy lensing tomography, and redshift-space multipole power spectra (monopole and quadrupole) using 450 deg$^2$ of imaging data by the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) overlapping with two spectroscopic surveys: the 2-degree Field Lensing Survey (2dFLenS) and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We restrict the galaxy-galaxy lensing and multipole power spectrum measurements to the overlapping regions with KiDS, and self-consistently compute the full covariance between the different observables using a large suite of $N$-body simulations. We methodically analyze different combinations of the observables, finding that galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements are particularly useful in improving the constraint on the intrinsic alignment amplitude (by 30%, positive at $3.5\sigma$ in the fiducial data analysis), while the multipole power spectra are useful in tightening the constraints along the lensing degeneracy direction (e.g. factor of two stronger matter density constraint in the fiducial analysis). The fully combined constraint on $S_8 \equiv \sigma_8 \sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3} = 0.742 \pm 0.035$, which is an improvement by 20% compared to KiDS alone, corresponds to a $2.6\sigma$ discordance with Planck, and is not significantly affected by fitting to a more conservative set of scales. Given the tightening of the parameter space, we are unable to resolve the discordance with an extended cosmology that is simultaneously favored in a model selection sense, including the sum of neutrino masses, curvature, evolving dark energy, and modified gravity. The complementarity of our observables allow for constraints on modified gravity degrees of freedom that are not simultaneously bounded with either probe alone, and up to a factor of three improvement in the $S_8$ constraint in the extended cosmology compared to KiDS alone.
  • We present the tomographic cross-correlation between galaxy lensing measured in the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS-450) with overlapping lensing measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), as detected by Planck 2015. We compare our joint probe measurement to the theoretical expectation for a flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmology, assuming the best-fitting cosmological parameters from the KiDS-450 cosmic shear and Planck CMB analyses. We find that our results are consistent within $1\sigma$ with the KiDS-450 cosmology, with an amplitude re-scaling parameter $A_{\rm KiDS} = 0.86 \pm 0.19$. Adopting a Planck cosmology, we find our results are consistent within $2\sigma$, with $A_{\it Planck} = 0.68 \pm 0.15$. We show that the agreement is improved in both cases when the contamination to the signal by intrinsic galaxy alignments is accounted for, increasing $A$ by $\sim 0.1$. This is the first tomographic analysis of the galaxy lensing -- CMB lensing cross-correlation signal, and is based on five photometric redshift bins. We use this measurement as an independent validation of the multiplicative shear calibration and of the calibrated source redshift distribution at high redshifts. We find that constraints on these two quantities are strongly correlated when obtained from this technique, which should therefore not be considered as a stand-alone competitive calibration tool.
  • We measure the cross-correlation between Fermi-LAT gamma-ray photons and over 1000 deg$^2$ of weak lensing data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS), the Red Cluster Sequence Lensing Survey (RCSLenS), and the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS). We present the first measurement of tomographic weak lensing cross-correlations and the first application of spectral binning to cross-correlations between gamma rays and weak lensing. The measurements are performed using an angular power spectrum estimator while the covariance is estimated using an analytical prescription. We verify the accuracy of our covariance estimate by comparing it to two internal covariance estimators. Based on the non-detection of a cross-correlation signal, we derive constraints on weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. We compute exclusion limits on the dark matter annihilation cross-section $\langle\sigma_\rm{ann} v \rangle$, decay rate $\Gamma_\rm{dec}$, and particle mass $m_\rm{DM}$. We find that in the absence of a cross-correlation signal, tomography does not significantly improve the constraining power of the analysis. Assuming a strong contribution to the gamma-ray flux due to small-scale clustering of dark matter and accounting for known astrophysical sources of gamma rays, we exclude the thermal relic cross-section for particle masses of $m_\rm{DM}\lesssim 20$ GeV.
  • We present a re-analysis of the CFHTLenS weak gravitational lensing survey using Complete Orthogonal Sets of E/B-mode Integrals, known as COSEBIs. COSEBIs provide a complete set of functions to efficiently separate E-modes from B-modes and hence allow for robust and stringent tests for systematic errors in the data. This analysis reveals significant B-modes on large angular scales that were not previously seen using the standard E/B decomposition analyses. We find that the significance of the B-modes is enhanced when the data is split by galaxy type and analysed in tomographic redshift bins. Adding tomographic bins to the analysis increases the number of COSEBIs modes, which results in a less accurate estimation of the covariance matrix from a set of simulations. We therefore also present the first compressed COSEBIs analysis of survey data, where the COSEBIs modes are optimally combined based on their sensitivity to cosmological parameters. In this tomographic CCOSEBIs analysis we find the B-modes to be consistent with zero when the full range of angular scales are considered.
  • We develop a statistical estimator to infer the redshift probability distribution of a photometric sample of galaxies from its angular cross-correlation in redshift bins with an overlapping spectroscopic sample. This estimator is a minimum variance weighted quadratic function of the data: a quadratic estimator. This extends and modifies the methodology presented by McQuinn & White (2013). The derived source redshift distribution is degenerate with the source galaxy bias, which must be constrained via additional assumptions. We apply this estimator to constrain source galaxy redshift distributions in the Kilo-Degree imaging survey through cross-correlation with the spectroscopic 2-degree Field Lensing Survey, presenting results first as a binned step-wise distribution in the range z < 0.8, and then building a continuous distribution using a Gaussian process model. We demonstrate the robustness of our methodology using mock catalogues constructed from N-body simulations, and comparisons with other techniques for inferring the redshift distribution.
  • We investigate the impact of astrophysical systematics on cosmic shear cosmological parameter constraints from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS), and the concordance with cosmic microwave background measurements by Planck. We present updated CFHTLenS cosmic shear tomography measurements extended to degree scales using a covariance calibrated by a new suite of N-body simulations. We analyze these measurements with a new model fitting pipeline, accounting for key systematic uncertainties arising from intrinsic galaxy alignments, baryonic effects in the nonlinear matter power spectrum, and photometric redshift uncertainties. We examine the impact of the systematic degrees of freedom on the cosmological parameter constraints, both independently and jointly. When the systematic uncertainties are considered independently, the intrinsic alignment amplitude is the only degree of freedom that is substantially preferred by the data. When the systematic uncertainties are considered jointly, there is no consistently strong preference in favor of the more complex models. We quantify the level of concordance between the CFHTLenS and Planck datasets by employing two distinct data concordance tests, grounded in Bayesian evidence and information theory. We find that the two data concordance tests largely agree with one another, and that the level of concordance between the CFHTLenS and Planck datasets is sensitive to the exact details of the systematic uncertainties included in our analysis, ranging from decisive discordance to substantial concordance as the treatment of the systematic uncertainties becomes more conservative. The least conservative scenario is the one most favored by the cosmic shear data, but it is also the one that shows the greatest degree of discordance with Planck. The data and analysis code are public at https://github.com/sjoudaki/cfhtlens_revisited
  • Astrophysical techniques have pioneered the discovery of neutrino mass properties. Current cosmological observations give an upper bound on neutrino masses by attempting to disentangle the small neutrino contribution from the sum of all matter using precise theoretical models. We discover the differential neutrino condensation effect in our TianNu N-body simulation. Neutrino masses can be inferred using this effect by comparing galaxy properties in regions of the universe with different neutrino relative abundance (i.e. the local neutrino to cold dark matter density ratio). In "neutrino-rich"' regions, more neutrinos can be captured by massive halos compared to "neutrino-poor" regions. This effect differentially skews the halo mass function and opens up the path to independent neutrino mass measurements in current or future galaxy surveys.
  • We present measurements of the spatial mapping between (hot) baryons and the total matter in the Universe, via the cross-correlation between the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) map from Planck and the weak gravitational lensing maps from the Red Sequence Cluster Survey (RCSLenS). The cross-correlations are performed on the map level where all the sources (including diffuse intergalactic gas) contribute to the signal. We consider two configuration-space correlation function estimators, $\xi^{ y-\kappa}$ and $\xi^ {y-\gamma_{t}}$, and a Fourier space estimator, $C_{\ell}^{y-\kappa}$, in our analysis. We detect a significant correlation out to three degrees of angular separation on the sky. Based on statistical noise only, we can report 13$\sigma$ and 17$\sigma$ detections of the cross-correlation using the configuration-space $y-\kappa$ and $y-\gamma_{t}$ estimators, respectively. Including a heuristic estimate of the sampling variance yields a detection significance of 6$\sigma$ and 8$\sigma$, respectively. A similar level of detection is obtained from the Fourier-space estimator, $C_{\ell}^{y-\kappa}$. As each estimator probes different dynamical ranges, their combination improves the significance of the detection. We compare our measurements with predictions from the cosmo-OWLS suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, where different galactic feedback models are implemented. We find that a model with considerable AGN feedback that removes large quantities of hot gas from galaxy groups and WMAP-7yr best-fit cosmological parameters provides the best match to the measurements. All baryonic models in the context of a Planck cosmology over-predict the observed signal. Similar cosmological conclusions are drawn when we employ a halo model with the observed `universal' pressure profile.
  • We present the 2-degree Field Lensing Survey (2dFLenS), a new galaxy redshift survey performed at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. 2dFLenS is the first wide-area spectroscopic survey specifically targeting the area mapped by deep-imaging gravitational lensing fields, in this case the Kilo-Degree Survey. 2dFLenS obtained 70,079 redshifts in the range z < 0.9 over an area of 731 sq deg, and is designed to extend the datasets available for testing gravitational physics and promote the development of relevant algorithms for joint imaging and spectroscopic analysis. The redshift sample consists first of 40,531 Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs), which enable analyses of galaxy-galaxy lensing, redshift-space distortion, and the overlapping source redshift distribution by cross-correlation. An additional 28,269 redshifts form a magnitude-limited (r < 19.5) nearly-complete sub-sample, allowing direct source classification and photometric-redshift calibration. In this paper, we describe the motivation, target selection, spectroscopic observations, and clustering analysis of 2dFLenS. We use power spectrum multipole measurements to fit the redshift-space distortion parameter of the LRG sample in two redshift ranges 0.15 < z < 0.43 and 0.43 < z < 0.7 as beta = 0.49 +/- 0.15 and beta = 0.26 +/- 0.09, respectively. These values are consistent with those obtained from LRGs in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. 2dFLenS data products will be released via our website http://2dflens.swin.edu.au.
  • We measure the cross-correlation signature between the Planck CMB lensing map and the weak lensing observations from both the Red-sequence Cluster Lensing Survey (RCSLenS) and the Canada-France-Hawai Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). In addition to a Fourier analysis, we include the first configuration-space detection, based on the estimators $\langle \kappa_{\rm CMB} \kappa_{\rm gal} \rangle$ and $\langle \kappa_{\rm CMB} \gamma_{t} \rangle$. Combining 747.2 deg$^2$ from both surveys, we find a detection significance that exceeds $4.2\sigma$ in both Fourier- and configuration-space analyses. Scaling the predictions by a free parameter $A$, we obtain $A^{\rm Planck}_{\rm CFHT}= 0.68\pm 0.31 $ and $A^{\rm Planck}_{\rm RCS}= 1.31\pm 0.33$. In preparation for the next generation of measurements similar to these, we quantify the impact of different analysis choices on these results. First, since none of these estimators probes the exact same dynamical range, we improve our detection by combining them. Second, we carry out a detailed investigation on the effect of apodization, zero-padding and mask multiplication, validated on a suite of high-resolution simulations, and find that the latter produces the largest systematic bias in the cosmological interpretation. Finally, we show that residual contamination from intrinsic alignment and the effect of photometric redshift error are both largely degenerate with the characteristic signal from massive neutrinos, however the signature of baryon feedback might be easier to distinguish. The three lensing datasets are now publicly available.
  • We use the cosmo-OWLS suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, which includes different galactic feedback models, to predict the cross-correlation signal between weak gravitational lensing and the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) $y$-parameter. The predictions are compared to the recent detection reported by van Waerbeke and collaborators. The simulations reproduce the weak lensing-tSZ cross-correlation, $\xi_{y\kappa}(\theta)$, well. The uncertainty arising from different possible feedback models appears to be important on small scales only ($\theta \lesssim 10$ arcmin), while the amplitude of the correlation on all scales is sensitive to cosmological parameters that control the growth rate of structure (such as $\sigma_8$, $\Omega_m$ and $\Omega_b$). This study confirms our previous claim (in Ma et al.) that a significant proportion of the signal originates from the diffuse gas component in low-mass ($M_{\rm{halo}} \lesssim 10^{14} M_{\odot}$) clusters as well as from the region beyond the virial radius. We estimate that approximately 20$\%$ of the detected signal comes from low-mass clusters, which corresponds to about 30$\%$ of the baryon density of the Universe. The simulations also suggest that more than half of the baryons in the Universe are in the form of diffuse gas outside halos ($\gtrsim 5$ times the virial radius) which is not hot or dense enough to produce a significant tSZ signal or be observed by X-ray experiments. Finally, we show that future high-resolution tSZ-lensing cross-correlation observations will serve as a powerful tool for discriminating between different galactic feedback models.
  • The unknown nature of dark energy motivates continued cosmological tests of large-scale gravitational physics. We present a new consistency check based on the relative amplitude of non-relativistic galaxy peculiar motions, measured via redshift-space distortion, and the relativistic deflection of light by those same galaxies traced by galaxy-galaxy lensing. We take advantage of the latest generation of deep, overlapping imaging and spectroscopic datasets, combining the Red Cluster Sequence Lensing Survey (RCSLenS), the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS), the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We quantify the results using the "gravitational slip" statistic E_G, which we estimate as 0.48 +/- 0.10 at z=0.32 and 0.30 +/- 0.07 at z=0.57, the latter constituting the highest redshift at which this quantity has been determined. These measurements are consistent with the predictions of General Relativity, for a perturbed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric in a Universe dominated by a cosmological constant, which are E_G = 0.41 and 0.36 at these respective redshifts. The combination of redshift-space distortion and gravitational lensing data from current and future galaxy surveys will offer increasingly stringent tests of fundamental cosmology.
  • Applying a transformation to a non-Gaussian field can enhance the information content of the resulting power spectrum, by reducing the correlations between Fourier modes. In the context of weak gravitational lensing, it has been shown that this gain in information content is significantly compromised by the presence of shape noise. We apply clipping to mock convergence fields, a technique which is known to be robust in the presence of noise and has been successfully applied to galaxy number density fields. When analysed in isolation the resulting convergence power spectrum returns degraded constraints on cosmological parameters. However substantial gains can be achieved by performing a combined analysis of the power spectra derived from both the original and transformed fields. Even in the presence of realistic levels of shape noise, we demonstrate that this approach is capable of reducing the area of likelihood contours within the $\Omega_m - \sigma_8$ plane by more than a factor of three.
  • Dark energy may be the first sign of new fundamental physics in the Universe, taking either a physical form or revealing a correction to Einsteinian gravity. Weak gravitational lensing and galaxy peculiar velocities provide complementary probes of General Relativity, and in combination allow us to test modified theories of gravity in a unique way. We perform such an analysis by combining measurements of cosmic shear tomography from the Canada-France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) with the growth of structure from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey and the Six-degree-Field Galaxy Survey (6dFGS), producing the strongest existing joint constraints on the metric potentials that describe general theories of gravity. For scale-independent modifications to the metric potentials which evolve linearly with the effective dark energy density, we find present-day cosmological deviations in the Newtonian potential and curvature potential from the prediction of General Relativity to be (Delta Psi)/Psi = 0.05 \pm 0.25 and (Delta Phi)/Phi = -0.05 \pm 0.3 respectively (68 per cent CL).
  • The Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) is a multi-band imaging survey designed for cosmological studies from weak lensing and photometric redshifts. It uses the ESO VLT Survey Telescope with its wide-field camera OmegaCAM. KiDS images are taken in four filters similar to the SDSS ugri bands. The best-seeing time is reserved for deep r-band observations that reach a median 5-sigma limiting AB magnitude of 24.9 with a median seeing that is better than 0.7arcsec. Initial KiDS observations have concentrated on the GAMA regions near the celestial equator, where extensive, highly complete redshift catalogues are available. A total of 109 survey tiles, one square degree each, form the basis of the first set of lensing analyses, which focus on measurements of halo properties of GAMA galaxies. 9 galaxies per square arcminute enter the lensing analysis, for an effective inverse shear variance of 69 per square arcminute. Accounting for the shape measurement weight, the median redshift of the sources is 0.53. KiDS data processing follows two parallel tracks, one optimized for galaxy shape measurement (for weak lensing), and one for accurate matched-aperture photometry in four bands (for photometric redshifts). This technical paper describes how the lensing and photometric redshift catalogues have been produced (including an extensive description of the Gaussian Aperture and Photometry pipeline), summarizes the data quality, and presents extensive tests for systematic errors that might affect the lensing analyses. We also provide first demonstrations of the suitability of the data for cosmological measurements, and explain how the shear catalogues were blinded to prevent confirmation bias in the scientific analyses. The KiDS shear and photometric redshift catalogues, presented in this paper, are released to the community through http://kids.strw.leidenuniv.nl .
  • The Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) is an optical wide-field imaging survey carried out with the VLT Survey Telescope and the OmegaCAM camera. KiDS will image 1500 square degrees in four filters (ugri), and together with its near-infrared counterpart VIKING will produce deep photometry in nine bands. Designed for weak lensing shape and photometric redshift measurements, the core science driver of the survey is mapping the large-scale matter distribution in the Universe back to a redshift of ~0.5. Secondary science cases are manifold, covering topics such as galaxy evolution, Milky Way structure, and the detection of high-redshift clusters and quasars. KiDS is an ESO Public Survey and dedicated to serving the astronomical community with high-quality data products derived from the survey data, as well as with calibration data. Public data releases will be made on a yearly basis, the first two of which are presented here. For a total of 148 survey tiles (~160 sq.deg.) astrometrically and photometrically calibrated, coadded ugri images have been released, accompanied by weight maps, masks, source lists, and a multi-band source catalog. A dedicated pipeline and data management system based on the Astro-WISE software system, combined with newly developed masking and source classification software, is used for the data production of the data products described here. The achieved data quality and early science projects based on the data products in the first two data releases are reviewed in order to validate the survey data. Early scientific results include the detection of nine high-z QSOs, fifteen candidate strong gravitational lenses, high-quality photometric redshifts and galaxy structural parameters for hundreds of thousands of galaxies. (Abridged)