• We studied the role of electron physics in 3D two-fluid 10-moment simulation of the Ganymede's magnetosphere. The model captures non-ideal physics like the Hall effect, the electron inertia, and anisotropic, non-gyrotropic pressure effects. A series of analyses were carried out: 1) The resulting magnetic field topology and electron and ion convection patterns were investigated. The magnetic fields were shown to agree reasonably well with in-situ measurements by the Galileo satellite. 2) The physics of collisionless magnetic reconnection were carefully examined in terms of the current sheet formation and decomposition of generalized Ohm's law. The importance of pressure anisotropy and non-gyrotropy in supporting the reconnection electric field is confirmed. 3) We compared surface "brightness" morphology, represented by surface electron and ion pressure contours, with oxygen emission observed by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The correlation between the observed emission morphology and spatial variability in electron/ion pressure was demonstrated. Potential extension to multi-ion species in the context of Ganymede and other magnetospheric systems is also discussed.
  • Magnetic holes have been frequently observed in the magnetosheath of Earth and it is believed that these structures are the result of nonlinear evolution of mirror instability. Mirror mode fluctuations mostly appear as magnetic holes in regions where plasma is marginally mirror stable with respect to the linear instability. We present an expanding box particle in cell simulation to mimic the magnetosheath plasma and produce the mirror mode magnetic holes. We show that magnetic peaks are dominant when plasma is mirror unstable and mirror fluctuations evolve to deep magnetic holes when plasma is marginally mirror stable. Although, the averaged plasma parameters in the simulation are marginally close to mirror instability threshold, the plasma in the magnetic holes is highly unstable to mirror instability and mirror stable in the magnetic peaks.
  • Proton mirror modes are large amplitude nonpropagating structures frequently observed in the magnetosheath. It has been suggested that electron temperature anisotropy can enhance the proton mirror instability growth rate while leaving the proton cyclotron instability largely unaffected, therefore causing the proton mirror instability to dominate the proton cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosheath. Here, we use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the electron temperature anisotropy effects on proton mirror instability evolution. Contrary to the hypothesis, electron temperature anisotropy leads to excitement of the electron whistler instability. Our results show that the electron whistler instability grows much faster than the proton mirror instability and quickly consumes the electron free energy, so that there is no electron temperature anisotropy left to significantly impact the evolution of the proton mirror instability.