• We present analysis of commissioning $M-$band data acquired with the infrared echelle spectrograph (iSHELL) on {\it NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility}. In this paper we describe the delivered performance of the instrument for these $M-$band observations and the data reduction process. The feasibility of using iSHELL for spectro-astrometry is tested on the Herbig Ae/Be star HD~179218 and we show that sub-milliarcsecond fidelity is achievable.
  • Although stars accrete mass throughout the first few Myr of their lives, the physical mechanism that drives disk accretion in the T Tauri phase is uncertain, and diagnostics that probe the nature of disk accretion have been elusive, particularly in the planet formation region of the disk. Here we explore whether an accretion process such as the magnetorotational instability could be detected through its "heat signature", the energy it deposits in the disk atmosphere. To examine this possibility, we investigate the impact of accretion-related mechanical heating and energetic stellar irradiation (FUV and X-rays) on the thermal-chemical properties of disk atmospheres at planet formation distances. We find that stellar FUV irradiation (Lyman alpha and continuum), through its role in heating and photodissociation, affects much of the upper warm (400-2000 K) molecular layer of the atmosphere, and the properties of the layer are generally in good agreement with the observed molecular emission features of disks at UV, near-infrared, and mid-infrared wavelengths. At the same time, the effect of FUV irradiation is restricted to the upper molecular layer of the disk, even when irradiation by Ly alpha is included. The region immediately below the FUV-heated layer is potentially dominated by accretion-related mechanical heating. As cooler (90-400 K) CO, water, and other molecules are potential diagnostics of the mechanically-heated layer, emission line studies of these diagnostics might be used to search for evidence of the magnetorotational instability in action.
  • Residual gas in disks around young stars can spin down stars, circularize the orbits of terrestrial planets, and whisk away the dusty debris that is expected to serve as a signpost of terrestrial planet formation. We have carried out a sensitive search for residual gas and dust in the terrestrial planet region surrounding young stars ranging in age from a few Myr to ~10 Myr in age. Using high resolution 4.7 micron spectra of transition objects and weak T Tauri stars, we searched for weak continuum excesses and CO fundamental emission, after making a careful correction for the stellar contribution to the observed spectrum. We find that the CO emission from transition objects is weaker and located further from the star than CO emission from non-transition T Tauri stars with similar stellar accretion rates. The difference is possibly the result of chemical and/or dynamical effects (i.e., a low CO abundance or close-in low-mass planets). The weak T Tauri stars show no CO fundamental emission down to low flux levels (5 x 10^(-20) - 10^{-18} W/m^2). We illustrate how our results can be used to constrain the residual disk gas content in these systems and discuss their potential implications for star and planet formation.
  • We reconsider the commonly held assumption that warm debris disks are tracers of terrestrial planet formation. The high occurrence rate inferred for Earth-mass planets around mature solar-type stars based on exoplanet surveys (roughly 20%) stands in stark contrast to the low incidence rate (less than 2-3%) of warm dusty debris around solar-type stars during the expected epoch of terrestrial planet assembly (roughly 10 Myr). If Earth-mass planets at AU distances are a common outcome of the planet formation process, this discrepancy suggests that rocky planet formation occurs more quickly and/or is much neater than traditionally believed, leaving behind little in the way of a dust signature. Alternatively, the incidence rate of terrestrial planets has been overestimated or some previously unrecognized physical mechanism removes warm dust efficiently from the terrestrial planet region. A promising removal mechanism is gas drag in a residual gaseous disk with a surface density of roughly or somewhat more than 0.001% of the minimum mass solar nebula.
  • We present a study of ro-vibrational OH and CO emission from 21 disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars. We find that the OH and CO luminosities are proportional over a wide range of stellar ultraviolet luminosities. The OH and CO line profiles are also similar, indicating that they arise from roughly the same radial region of the disk. The CO and OH emission are both correlated with the far-ultraviolet luminosity of the stars, while the PAH luminosity is correlated with the longer wavelength ultraviolet luminosity of the stars. Although disk flaring affects the PAH luminosity, it is not a factor in the luminosity of the OH and CO emission. These properties are consistent with models of UV-irradiated disk atmospheres. We also find that the transition disks in our sample, which have large optically thin inner regions, have lower OH and CO luminosities than non-transition disk sources with similar ultraviolet luminosities. This result, while tentative given the small sample size, is consistent with the interpretation that transition disks lack a gaseous disk close to the star.
  • We present deep Herschel-PACS spectroscopy of far-infrared water lines from a sample of four protoplanetary disks around solar-mass stars, selected to have strong water emission at mid-infrared wavelengths. By combining the new Herschel spectra with archival Spitzer-IRS spectroscopy, we retrieve a parameterized radial surface water vapor distribution from 0.1-100 AU using two-dimensional dust and line radiative transfer modeling. The surface water distribution is modeled with a step model comprising of a constant inner and outer relative water abundance and a critical radius at which the surface water abundance is allowed to change. We find that the four disks have critical radii of $\sim 3-11$ AU, at which the surface water abundance decreases by at least 5 orders of magnitude. The measured values for the critical radius are consistently smaller than the location of the surface snow line, as predicted by the observed spectral energy distribution. This suggests that the sharp drop-off of the surface water abundance is not solely due to the local gas-solid balance, but may also be driven by the de-activation of gas-phase chemical pathways to water below 300 K. Assuming a canonical gas-to-dust ratio of 100, as well as coupled gas and dust temperatures $T_{\rm gas}=T_{\rm dust}$, the best-fit inner water abundances become implausibly high (0.01-1.0 ${\rm H_{2}}^{-1}$). Conversely, a model in which the gas and dust temperatures are decoupled leads to canonical inner disk water abundances of $\sim 10^{-4} \rm H_{2}^{-1}$, while retaining gas-to-dust ratios of 100. That is, the evidence for gas-dust decoupling in disk surfaces is stronger than for enhanced gas-to-dust ratios.
  • Protoplanetary disks are strongly irradiated by a stellar FUV spectrum that is dominated by Ly$\alpha$ photons. We investigate the impact of stellar Ly$\alpha$ irradiation on the terrestrial planet region of disks ($\lesssim 1$AU) using an updated thermal-chemical model of a disk atmosphere irradiated by stellar FUV and X-rays. The radiative transfer of Ly$\alpha$ is implemented in a simple approach that includes scattering by H I and absorption by molecules and dust. Because of their non-radial propagation path, scattered Ly$\alpha$ photons deposit their energy deeper in the disk atmosphere than the radially propagating FUV continuum photons. We find that Ly$\alpha$ has a significant impact on the thermal structure of the atmosphere. Photochemical heating produced by scattered Ly$\alpha$ photons interacting with water vapor and OH leads to a layer of hot (1500 - 2500 K) molecular gas. The temperature in the layer is high enough to thermally excite the H$_2$ to vibrational levels from which they can be fluoresced by Ly$\alpha$ to produce UV fluorescent H$_2$ emission. The resulting atmospheric structure may help explain the origin of UV fluorescent H$_2$ that is commonly observed from classical T Tauri stars.
  • Warren Skidmore, Ian Dell'Antonio, Misato Fukugawa, Aruna Goswami, Lei Hao, David Jewitt, Greg Laughlin, Charles Steidel, Paul Hickson, Luc Simard, Matthias Schöck, Tommaso Treu, Judith Cohen, G.C. Anupama, Mark Dickinson, Fiona Harrison, Tadayuki Kodama, Jessica R. Lu, Bruce Macintosh, Matt Malkan, Shude Mao, Norio Narita, Tomohiko Sekiguchi, Annapurni Subramaniam, Masaomi Tanaka, Feng Tian, Michael A'Hearn, Masayuki Akiyama, Babar Ali, Wako Aoki, Manjari Bagchi, Aaron Barth, Varun Bhalerao, Marusa Bradac, James Bullock, Adam J. Burgasser, Scott Chapman, Ranga-Ram Chary, Masashi Chiba, Michael Cooper, Asantha Cooray, Ian Crossfield, Thayne Currie, Mousumi Das, G.C. Dewangan, Richard de Grijs, Tuan Do, Subo Dong, Jarah Evslin, Taotao Fang, Xuan Fang, Christopher Fassnacht, Leigh Fletcher, Eric Gaidos, Roy Gal, Andrea Ghez, Mauro Giavalisco, Carol A. Grady, Thomas Greathouse, Rupjyoti Gogoi, Puragra Guhathakurta, Luis Ho, Priya Hasan, Gregory J. Herczeg, Mitsuhiko Honda, Masa Imanishi, Hanae Inami, Masanori Iye, Jason Kalirai, U.S. Kamath, Stephen Kane, Nobunari Kashikawa, Mansi Kasliwal, Vishal Kasliwal, Evan Kirby, Quinn M. Konopacky, Sebastien Lepine, Di Li, Jianyang Li, Junjun Liu, Michael C. Liu, Enrigue Lopez-Rodriguez, Jennifer Lotz, Philip Lubin, Lucas Macri, Keiichi Maeda, Franck Marchis, Christian Marois, Alan Marscher, Crystal Martin, Taro Matsuo, Claire Max, Alan McConnachie, Stacy McGough, Carl Melis, Leo Meyer, Michael Mumma, Takayuki Muto, Tohru Nagao, Joan R. Najita, Julio Navarro, Michael Pierce, Jason X. Prochaska, Masamune Oguri, Devendra K. Ojha, Yoshiko K. Okamoto, Glenn Orton, Angel Otarola, Masami Ouchi, Chris Packham, Deborah L. Padgett, Shashi Bhushan Pandey, Catherine Pilachowsky, Klaus M. Pontoppidan, Joel Primack, Shalima Puthiyaveettil, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz, Naveen Reddy, Michael Rich, Matthew J. Richter, James Schombert, Anjan Ananda Sen, Jianrong Shi, Kartik Sheth, R. Srianand, Jonathan C. Tan, Masayuki Tanaka, Angelle Tanner, Nozomu Tominaga, David Tytler, Vivian U, Lingzhi Wang, Xiaofeng Wang, Yiping Wang, Gillian Wilson, Shelley Wright, Chao Wu, Xufeng Wu, Renxin Xu, Toru Yamada, Bin Yang, Gongbo Zhao, Hongsheng Zhao
    The TMT Detailed Science Case describes the transformational science that the Thirty Meter Telescope will enable. Planned to begin science operations in 2024, TMT will open up opportunities for revolutionary discoveries in essentially every field of astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology, seeing much fainter objects much more clearly than existing telescopes. Per this capability, TMT's science agenda fills all of space and time, from nearby comets and asteroids, to exoplanets, to the most distant galaxies, and all the way back to the very first sources of light in the Universe. More than 150 astronomers from within the TMT partnership and beyond offered input in compiling the new 2015 Detailed Science Case. The contributing astronomers represent the entire TMT partnership, including the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA), the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), the University of California, the Association of Canadian Universities for Research in Astronomy (ACURA) and US associate partner, the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA).
  • Transition disc systems are young stars that appear to be on the verge of dispersing their protoplanetary discs. We explore the nature of these systems by comparing the stellar accretion rates and disc masses of transition discs and normal T Tauri stars in Taurus and Ophiuchus. After controlling for the known dependencies of stellar accretion rate and disc mass and on age, stellar accretion rate on stellar mass, and disc mass on the presence of stellar or sub-stellar companions, we find that the normal T Tauri stars show a trend of stellar accretion rate increasing with disc mass. The transition discs tend to have higher average disc masses than normal T Tauri stars as well as lower accretion rates than normal T Tauri stars of the same disc mass. These results are most consistent with the interpretation that the transition discs have formed objects massive enough to alter the accretion flow, i.e., single or multiple giant planets. Several Ophiuchus T Tauri stars that are not known transition disc systems also have very low accretion rates for their disc masses. We speculate on the possible nature of these sources.
  • In this review, we describe how high resolution near infrared spectroscopy and spectro-astrometry have been used to study the disks around Herbig~Ae/Be stars. We show how these tools can be used to identify signposts of planet formation and elucidate the mechanism by which Herbig Ae/Be stars accrete. We also highlight some of the artifacts that can complicate the interpretation of spectro-astrometric measurements and discuss best practices for mitigating these effects. We conclude with a brief discussion of the value of long term monitoring of these systems.
  • We report high resolution NIR spectroscopy of CO and OH emission from the Herbig Be star HD100546. We discuss how our results bear striking resemblance to several theoretically predicted signposts of giant planet formation. The properties of the CO and OH emission lines are consistent with our earlier interpretation that these diagnostics provide indirect evidence for a companion that orbits the star close to the disk wall (at ~13au). The asymmetry of the OH spectral line profiles and their lack of time variability are consistent with emission from gas in an eccentric orbit at the disk wall that is approximately stationary in the inertial frame. The time variable spectroastrometric properties of the CO v=1-0 emission line point to an orbiting source of CO emission with an emitting area similar to that expected for a circumplanetary disk (~0.1au^2) assuming the CO emission is optically thick. We also consider a counterhypothesis to this interpretation, namely that the variable CO emission arises from a bright spot on the disk wall. We conclude with a brief suggestion of further work that can distinguish between these scenarios.
  • We present H, Ks and L filter polarimetric differential imaging (PDI) data for the transitional disk around HD100546 obtained in 2013, together with an improved re-reduction of previously published 2006 data. We reveal the disk in polarized scattered light in all three filters, achieving an inner working angle of 0.1 arcsec. Additional, short-exposure observations in the H and Ks filter probe the surrounding of the star down to about 0.03 (about 3 AU). HD100546 is fascinating because of its variety of sub-structures possibly related to forming planets in the disk, and PDI is currently the best technique to image them in the near-IR. Our key results are: (1) For the first time ever, we detect a disk in L-band PDI data. (2) We constrain the outer radius of the inner hole to 14pm2 AU and its eccentricity to < 0.133. (3) We detect a dark lane in the front side of the disk, which is likely an effect of the scattering angle and the scattering function of the grains. (4) We find a spiral arm in the northeast which has no obvious connection to spiral arms seen before by other authors further out in the disk, but winds in the same direction (clockwise). (5) The two bright scattering peaks along the semi-major axis are asymmetric, with the southeastern one being significantly brighter. This could be related to the inner companion candidate that is close to the brighter side of the disk at the time of the observations. (6) The scattering color is close to grey between H and Ks filter, but the scattering in L filter is significantly weaker. (7) We measure the position angle of the disk to be 138pm3 deg, consistent with previous observations. (8) We derive the dust scattering function in the H and Ks filter between 35 and 130 deg at two different radii (30-50 and 80-110 AU) and show that our results are consistent with a disk that is more strongly flared in the outer regions.
  • We present an integrated thermal-chemical model for the atmosphere of the inner region of a protoplanetary disk that includes irradiation by both far ultraviolet (FUV) and X-ray radiation. We focus on how the photodissociation of water and OH affects the abundances of these and related species and how it contributes to the heating of the atmosphere. The dust in the atmosphere plays several important roles, primarily as the site of H$_2$ formation and by absorbing the FUV. Large amounts of water can be synthesized within the inner 4 AU of a disk around a typical classical T~Tauri star. OH is found primarily at the top of a warm region where the gas temperature is $T_g \approx 650 - 1000$ K and water below it where the temperature is lower, $T_g \approx 250 - 650$ K. The amounts of water and OH and the temperatures of the regions in which they formed are in agreement with recent Spitzer measurements and support the notion of it in situ production of water in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. We find that the synthesized water is effective in shielding the disk midplane from stellar FUV radiation.
  • The K2 mission will make use of the Kepler spacecraft and its assets to expand upon Kepler's groundbreaking discoveries in the fields of exoplanets and astrophysics through new and exciting observations. K2 will use an innovative way of operating the spacecraft to observe target fields along the ecliptic for the next 2-3 years. Early science commissioning observations have shown an estimated photometric precision near 400 ppm in a single 30 minute observation, and a 6-hour photometric precision of 80 ppm (both at V=12). The K2 mission offers long-term, simultaneous optical observation of thousands of objects at a precision far better than is achievable from ground-based telescopes. Ecliptic fields will be observed for approximately 75-days enabling a unique exoplanet survey which fills the gaps in duration and sensitivity between the Kepler and TESS missions, and offers pre-launch exoplanet target identification for JWST transit spectroscopy. Astrophysics observations with K2 will include studies of young open clusters, bright stars, galaxies, supernovae, and asteroseismology.
  • We present observations of rovibrational CO in HD 100546 from four epochs spanning January 2003 through December 2010. We show that the equivalent widths of the CO lines vary during this time period with the v=1-0 CO lines brightening more than the UV fluoresced lines from the higher vibrational states. While the spectroastrometric signal of the hot band lines remains constant during this period, the spectroastrometric signal of the v=1--0 lines varies substantially. At all epochs, the spectroastrometric signals of the UV fluoresced lines are consistent with the signal one would expect from gas in an axisymmetric disk. In 2003, the spectroastrometric signal of the v=1-0 P26 line was symmetric and consistent with emission from an axisymmetric disk. However, in 2006, there was no spatial offset of the signal detected on the red side of the profile, and in 2010, the spectroastrometric offset was yet more strongly reduced toward zero velocity. A model is presented that can explain the evolution of the equivalent width of the v=1-0 P26 line and its spectroastrometric signal by adding to the system a compact source of CO emission that orbits the star near the inner edge of the disk. We hypothesize that such emission may arise from a circumplanetary disk orbiting a gas giant planet near the inner edge of the circumstellar disk. We discuss how this idea can be tested observationally and be distinguished from an alternative interpretation of random fluctuations in the disk emission.
  • Our Spitzer IRS observation of the infrared companion Glass Ib revealed fine structure emission with high ionization ([NeIII]/[NeII]=2.1 and [SIV]/[SIII]=0.6) that indicates the gas is likely illuminated by hard radiation. While models suggest extreme ultraviolet radiation could be present in T Tauri stars (Hollenbach & Gorti 2009 and references therein), this is the first detection of [SIV] and such a high [NeIII]/[NeII] ratio in a young star. We also find that Glass Ib displays the molecules HCN, CO2, and H2O in emission. Here we investigate the Glass I binary system and consider possible mechanisms that may have caused the high ionization, whether from an outflow or disk irradiation. We also model the spectral energy distributions of Glass Ia and Ib to test if the system is a young member of the Chameleon I star-forming region, and consider other possible classifications for the system. We find Glass Ib is highly variable, showing changes in continuum strength and emission features at optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared wavelengths. The optical light curve indicates that a central stellar component in Glass Ib became entirely visible for 2.5 years beginning in mid-2002, and that possibly displayed periodic variability with repeated, short-period dimming during that time. As the fine structure emission was not detected in observations before or after our Spitzer IRS observation, we explore whether the variable nature of Glass Ib is related to the gas being highly ionized, possibly due to variable accretion or an X-ray flare.
  • We find a trend between the mid-infrared HCN/H2O flux ratio and submillimeter disk mass among T Tauri stars in Taurus. While it may seem puzzling that the molecular emission properties of the inner disk (< few AU) are related to the properties of the outer disk (beyond ~20 AU) probed by the submillimeter continuum, an interesting possible interpretation is that the trend is a result of planetesimal and protoplanet formation. Because objects this large are decoupled from the accretion flow, when they form, they can lock up water (and oxygen) beyond the snow line, thereby enhancing the C/O ratio in the inner disk and altering the molecular abundances there. We discuss the assumptions that underlie this interpretation, a possible alternative explanation, and related open questions that motivate future work. Whatever its origin, understanding the meaning of the relation between the HCN/H2O ratio and disk mass is of interest as trends like this among T Tauri disk properties are relatively rare.
  • We present findings for DoAr 24E, a binary system that includes a classical infrared companion. We observed the DoAr 24E system with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), with high-resolution, near-infrared spectroscopy of CO vibrational transitions, and with mid-infrared imaging. The source of high extinction toward infrared companions has been an item of continuing interest. Here we investigate the disk structure of DoAr 24E using the column densities, temperature, and velocity profiles of two CO absorption features seen toward DoAr 24Eb. We model the SEDs found using T-ReCS imaging, and investigate the likely sources of extinction toward DoAr 24Eb. We find the lack of silicate absorption and small CO column density toward DoAr 24Eb suggest the mid-infrared continuum is not as extinguished as the near-infrared, possibly due to the mid-infrared originating from an extended region. This, along with the velocity profile of the CO absorption, suggests the source of high extinction is likely due to a disk or disk wind associated with DoAr 24Eb.
  • We present observations of ro-vibrational OH and CO emission from the Herbig Be star HD 100546. The emission from both molecules arises from the inner region of the disk extending from approximately 13 AU from the central star. The velocity profiles of the OH lines are narrower than the velocity profile of the [O I] 6300 Angstrom line indicating that the OH in the disk is not cospatial with the O I. This suggests that the inner optically thin region of the disk is largely devoid of molecular gas. Unlike the ro-vibrational CO emission lines, the OH lines are highly asymmetric. We show that the average CO and average OH line profiles can be fit with a model of a disk comprised of an eccentric inner wall and a circular outer disk. In this model, the vast majority of the OH flux (75%) originates from the inner wall, while the vast majority of the CO flux (65%) originates on the surface of the disk at radii greater than 13 AU. Eccentric inner disks are predicted by hydrodynamic simulations of circumstellar disks containing an embedded giant planet. We discuss the implications of such a disk geometry in light of models of planet disk tidal interactions and propose alternate explanations for the origin of the asymmetry.
  • Observations from Spitzer and ground-based infrared spectroscopy reveal significant diversity in the molecular emission from the inner few AU of T Tauri disks. We explore theoretically the possible origin of this diversity by expanding on our earlier thermal-chemical model of disk atmospheres. We consider how variations in grain settling, X-ray irradiation, accretion-related mechanical heating, and the oxygen-to-carbon ratio can affect the thermal and chemical properties of the atmosphere at 0.25-40 AU. We find that these model parameters can account for many properties of the detected molecular emission. The column density of the warm (200-2000K) molecular atmosphere is sensitive to grain settling and the efficiency of accretion-related heating, which may account, at least in part, for the large range in molecular emission fluxes that have been observed. The dependence of the atmospheric properties on the model parameters may also help to explain trends that have been reported in the literature between molecular emission strength and mid-infrared color, stellar accretion rate, and disk mass. We discuss whether some of the differences between our model results and the observations (e.g., for water) indicate a role for vertical transport and freeze-out in the disk midplane. We also discuss how planetesimal formation in the outer disk (beyond the snowline) may imprint a chemical signature on the inner few AU of the disk and speculate on possible observational tracers of this process.
  • We present high resolution (R=24,000) L-band spectra of the young intermediate mass star V1331 Cyg obtained with NIRSPEC on the Keck II telescope. The spectra show strong, rich emission from water and OH that likely arises from the warm surface region of the circumstellar disk. We explore the use of the new BT2 (Barber et al. 2006) water line list in fitting the spectra, and we find that it does a much better job than the well-known HITRAN (Rothman et al. 1998) water line list in the observed wavelength range and for the warm temperatures probed by our data. By comparing the observed spectra with synthetic disk emission models, we find that the water and OH emission lines have similar widths (FWHM ~ 18 km s-1). If the line widths are set by disk rotation, the OH and water emission lines probe a similar range of disk radii in this source. The water and OH emission are consistent with thermal emission for both components at a temperature ~ 1500 K. The column densities of the emitting water and OH are large, ~ 10^{21} cm-2 and ~ 10^{20} cm-2, respectively. Such a high column density of water is more than adequate to shield the disk midplane from external UV irradiation in the event of complete dust settling out of the disk atmosphere, enabling chemical synthesis to continue in the midplane despite a harsh external UV environment. The large OH-to-water ratio is similar to expectations for UV irradiated disks (e.g., Bethell and Bergin 2009), although the large OH column density is less easily accounted for.
  • We present high resolution near-infrared spectra of $\beta$ Pictoris - a nearby young star with a debris disk. Fundamental low-J CO absorption lines are detected and strict upper limits are placed on the flux of v=2-1 low-J CO emission lines. The limit on the UV fluorescent emission flux in the v=2-1 lines is used to place a tight constraint on the inner extent of the CO gas. Assuming \ion{H}{1} is the primary collision partner, the subthermal population of the low-J v=0 rotational levels constrains the density of the gas in the disk to $n_{\rm H} = (2.5^{+7.1}_{-1.2})\times10^5$ cm$^{-3}$. If the distribution of hydrogen follows that of the other metals in the disk, we find that the mass of the gas in the disk is $(0.17^{+0.47}_{-0.08})$ M$_\earth$. We compare this mass to the gas mass necessary to brake the metals in the disk through ion-neutral reactions.
  • We report high signal-to-noise Spitzer IRS spectra of a sample of eleven classical T Tauri stars. Molecular emission from rotational transitions of H2O and OH and ro-vibrational bands of simple organic molecules (CO2, HCN, C2H2) is common among the sources in the sample. The gas temperatures (200-800 K) and emitting areas we derive are consistent with the emission originating in a warm disk atmosphere in the inner planet formation region at radii < 2 AU. The H2O emission appears to form under a limited range of excitation conditions, as shown by the similarity in relative strengths of H2O features from star to star and the narrow range in derived temperature and column density. Emission from highly excited rotational levels of OH is present in all stars; the OH emission flux increases with the stellar accretion rate, and the OH/H2O flux ratio shows a relatively small scatter. We interpret these results as evidence for OH production via FUV photo-dissociation of H2O in the disk surface layers. No obvious explanation is found for the observed range in the relative emission strengths of different organic molecules or in their strength with respect to water. We put forward the possibility that these variations reflect a diversity in organic abundances due to star-to-star differences in the C/O ratio of the inner disk gas. Stars with the largest HCN/H2O flux ratios in our sample have the largest disk masses. We speculate that such a trend could result if higher mass disks are more efficient at planetesimal formation and sequestration of water in the outer disk, leading to enhanced C/O ratios and abundances of organic molecules in the inner disk. A comparison of our derived HCN to H2O column density ratio to comets, hot cores, and outer T Tauri star disks suggests that the inner disks are chemically active.
  • We explore the extent to which Spitzer IRS spectra taken at low spectral resolution can be used in quantitative studies of organic molecular emission from disks surrounding low mass young stars. We use Spitzer IRS spectra taken in both the high and low resolution modules for the same sources to investigate whether it is possible to define line indices that can measure trends in the strength of the molecular features in low resolution data. We find that trends in HCN emission strength seen in the high resolution data can be recovered in low resolution data. In examining the factors that influence the HCN emission strength, we find that the low resolution HCN flux is modestly correlated with stellar accretion rate and X-ray luminosity. Correlations of this kind are perhaps expected based on recent observational and theoretical studies of inner disk atmospheres. Our results demonstrate the potential of using the large number of low resolution disk spectra that reside in the Spitzer archive to study the factors that influence the strength of molecular emission from disks. Such studies would complement results for the much smaller number of circumstellar disks that have been observed at high resolution with IRS.
  • We present findings for DG Tau B and VV CrA, two of the objects observed in our Spitzer IRS project to search for molecular absorption in edge-on disks, along with near-IR spectroscopy of the CO fundamental transitions and mid-IR imaging. While the only gas absorption seen in the Spitzer IRS spectrum toward DG Tau B is CO$_{2}$, we use gas abundances and gas/ice ratios to argue that we are probing regions of the disk that have low organic molecule abundances. This implies the rarity of detecting molecular absorption toward even edge-on disks with Spitzer IRS is a result of high dependence on the line of sight. We also argue the disk around DG Tau B shows high amounts of grain growth and settling. For VV CrA, we use the silicate absorption feature to estimate a dust extinction, and model the disk with a spectral energy distribution fitting tool to give evidence in support of the disk geometry presented by Smith et al. (2009) where the Primary disk is the main source of extinction toward the infrared companion.