• The black hole candidate 1E 1740.7-2942 is one of the strongest hard X-ray sources in the Galactic Center region. No counterparts in longer wavelengths have been identified for this object yet. The presence of characteristic timing signatures in the flux history of X-ray sources has been shown to be an important diagnostic tool for the properties of these systems. Using simultaneous data from NASA's Swift and ESA's INTEGRAL missions, we have found two periodic signatures at 12.61 $\pm$ 0.06 days and 171.1 $\pm$ 3.0 days in long-term hard X-ray light curves of 1E 1740.7-2942. We interpret those as the orbital and superorbital periods of the object, respectively. The reported orbital period is in good agreement with previous studies of 1E 1740.7-2942 using NASA's RXTE data. We present here the first firm evidence of a superorbital period for 1E 1740.7-2942, which has important implications for the nature of the binary system.
  • We report the results of detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the performance expected both at balloon altitudes and at the probable satellite orbit of a hard X-ray coded-aperture camera being developed for the MIRAX mission. Based on a thorough mass model of the instrument and detailed specifications of the spectra and angular dependence of the various relevant radiation fields at both the stratospheric and orbital environments, we have used the well-known package GEANT4 to simulate the instrumental background of the camera. We also show simulated images of source fields to be observed and calculated the detailed sensitivity of the instrument in both situations. The results reported here are especially important to researchers in this field considering that we provide important information, not easily found in the literature, on how to prepare input files and calculate crucial instrumental parameters to perform GEANT4 simulations for high-energy astrophysics space experiments.
  • The protoMIRAX hard X-ray imaging telescope is a balloon-borne experiment developed as a pathfinder for the MIRAX satellite mission. The experiment consists essentially in a coded-aperture hard X-ray (30-200 keV) imager with a square array (13$\times$13) of 2mm-thick planar CZT detectors with a total area of 169 cm$^2$. The total, fully-coded field-of-view is $21^{\circ}\times 21^{\circ}$ and the angular resolution is 1$^{\circ}$43'. In this paper we describe the protoMIRAX instrument and all the subsystems of its balloon gondola, and we show simulated results of the instrument performance. The main objective of protoMIRAX is to carry out imaging spectroscopy of selected bright sources to demonstrate the performance of a prototype of the MIRAX hard X-ray imager. Detailed background and imaging simulations have been performed for protoMIRAX balloon flights. The 3$\sigma$ sensitivity for the 30-200 keV range is ~1.9 $\times$ 10$^{-5}$ photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ for an integration time of 8 hs at an atmospheric depth of 2.7 g cm$^{-2}$ and an average zenith angle of 30$^{\circ}$. We have developed an attitude control system for the balloon gondola and new data handling and ground systems that also include prototypes for the MIRAX satellite. We present the results of Monte Carlo simulations of the camera response at balloon altitudes, showing the expected background level and the detailed sensitivity of protoMIRAX. We also present the results of imaging simulations of the Crab region. The results show that protoMIRAX is capable of making spectral and imaging observations of bright hard X-ray source fields. Furthermore, the balloon observations will carry out very important tests and demonstrations of MIRAX hardware and software in a near space environment.
  • The black hole system 1E${\thinspace}$1740.7$-$2942 is usually the brightest hard X-ray source (above 20 keV) near the Galactic Center, but presents some epochs of low emission (below the INTEGRAL detection limit, for example). In this work, we present the results of studies on 1E${\thinspace}$1740.7$-$2942 over 10 years, using the instruments ISGRI/IBIS and JEM-X, both on board the INTEGRAL observatory. We fit the spectra with both the compTT and cutoffpl models. According to the fits and taking the mean value over the 10 years, we have obtained a plasma temperature in the range $\sim$20$\,-\,$90$\thinspace$ keV, and an average powerlaw index of 1.41 ($\sigma$=0.25). We have also made a Lomb$\,-\,$Scargle periodogram of the flux in the 50$\,-\,$20${\thinspace}$keV band and found two tentative periods at 2.90 and 3.99${\thinspace}$days. We present here the preliminary results of this ongoing work.
  • Paolo Soffitta, Xavier Barcons, Ronaldo Bellazzini, João Braga, Enrico Costa, George W. Fraser, Szymon Gburek, Juhani Huovelin, Giorgio Matt, Mark Pearce, Juri Poutanen, Victor Reglero, Andrea Santangelo, Rashid A. Sunyaev, Gianpiero Tagliaferri, Martin Weisskopf, Roberto Aloisio, Elena Amato, Primo Attiná, Magnus Axelsson, Luca Baldini, Stefano Basso, Stefano Bianchi, Pasquale Blasi, Johan Bregeon, Alessandro Brez, Niccoló Bucciantini, Luciano Burderi, Vadim Burwitz, Piergiorgio Casella, Eugene Churazov, Marta Civitani, Stefano Covino, Rui Miguel Curado da Silva, Giancarlo Cusumano, Mauro Dadina, Flavio D'Amico, Alessandra De Rosa, Sergio Di Cosimo, Giuseppe Di Persio, Tiziana Di Salvo, Michal Dovciak, Ronald Elsner, Chris J. Eyles, Andrew C. Fabian, Sergio Fabiani, Hua Feng, Salvatore Giarrusso, René W. Goosmann, Paola Grandi, Nicolas Grosso, Gianluca Israel, Miranda Jackson, Philip Kaaret, Vladimir Karas, Michael Kuss, Dong Lai, Giovanni La Rosa, Josefin Larsson, Stefan Larsson, Luca Latronico, Antonio Maggio, Jorge Maia, Frédéric Marin, Marco Maria Massai, Teresa Mineo, Massimo Minuti, Elena Moretti, Fabio Muleri, Stephen L. O'Dell, Giovanni Pareschi, Giovanni Peres, Melissa Pesce, Pierre-Olivier Petrucci, Michele Pinchera, Delphine Porquet, Brian Ramsey, Nanda Rea, Fabio Reale, Juana Maria Rodrigo, Agata Różańska, Alda Rubini, Pawel Rudawy, Felix Ryde, Marco Salvati, Valdivino Alexandre de Santiago Júnior, Sergey Sazonov, Carmelo Sgró, Eric Silver, Gloria Spandre, Daniele Spiga, Luigi Stella, Toru Tamagawa, Francesco Tamborra, Fabrizio Tavecchio, Teresa Teixeira Dias, Matthew van Adelsberg, Kinwah Wu, Silvia Zane
    X-ray polarimetry, sometimes alone, and sometimes coupled to spectral and temporal variability measurements and to imaging, allows a wealth of physical phenomena in astrophysics to be studied. X-ray polarimetry investigates the acceleration process, for example, including those typical of magnetic reconnection in solar flares, but also emission in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars and white dwarfs. It detects scattering in asymmetric structures such as accretion disks and columns, and in the so-called molecular torus and ionization cones. In addition, it allows fundamental physics in regimes of gravity and of magnetic field intensity not accessible to experiments on the Earth to be probed. Finally, models that describe fundamental interactions (e.g. quantum gravity and the extension of the Standard Model) can be tested. We describe in this paper the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer (XIPE), proposed in June 2012 to the first ESA call for a small mission with a launch in 2017 but not selected. XIPE is composed of two out of the three existing JET-X telescopes with two Gas Pixel Detectors (GPD) filled with a He-DME mixture at their focus and two additional GPDs filled with pressurized Ar-DME facing the sun. The Minimum Detectable Polarization is 14 % at 1 mCrab in 10E5 s (2-10 keV) and 0.6 % for an X10 class flare. The Half Energy Width, measured at PANTER X-ray test facility (MPE, Germany) with JET-X optics is 24 arcsec. XIPE takes advantage of a low-earth equatorial orbit with Malindi as down-link station and of a Mission Operation Center (MOC) at INPE (Brazil).
  • The MIRAX X-ray observatory, the first Brazilian-led astrophysics space mission, is designed to perform an unprecedented wide-field, wide-band hard X-ray (5-200 keV) survey of Galactic X-ray transient sources. In the current configuration, MIRAX will carry a set of four coded-mask telescopes with high spatial resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detector planes, each one consisting of an array of 64 closely tiled CZT pixelated detectors. Taken together, the four telescopes will have a total detection area of 959 cm^2, a large field of view (60x60 degrees FWHM), high angular resolution for this energy range (6 arcmin) and very good spectral resolution (~2 keV @ 60 keV). A stratospheric balloon-borne prototype of one of the MIRAX telescopes has been developed, tested and flown by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) as part of the ProtoEXIST program. In this paper we show results of validation and calibration tests with individual CZT detectors of the ProtoEXIST second generation experiment (P2). Each one of 64 detector units of the P2 detector plane consists of an ASIC, developed by Caltech for the NuSTAR telescope, hybridized to a CZT crystal with 0.6 mm pixel size. The performance of each detector was evaluated using radioactive sources in the laboratory. The calibration results show that the P2 detectors have average energy resolution of ~2.1 keV @ 60 keV and ~2.3 keV @ 122 keV. P2 was also successfully tested on near-space environment on a balloon flight, demonstrating the detector unit readiness for integration on a space mission telescope, as well as satisfying all MIRAX mission requirements.
  • Studies of the long-term spectral variations have been used to constrain the emission processes of black hole candidates. However, a common scenario which is able to explain the emission from soft to hard X-rays has been proposed only recently. Here, we use XMM and INTEGRAL data on 1E 1740.7-2942 in order to demonstrate that Comptonization plays an important role in producing high energy photons, as predicted by the current modeling scenario.
  • A long X-ray flash was detected and localized by the instruments aboard the High Energy Transient Explorer II (HETE-2) at 00:03:30 UT on 2004 September 16. The position was reported to the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) approximately 2 hours after the burst. This burst consists of two peaks separated by 200 s, with durations of 110 s and 60 s. We have analyzed the energy spectra of the 1st and 2nd peaks observed with the Wide Field X-Ray Monitor (WXM) and the French Gamma Telescope (FREGATE). We discuss the origin of the 2nd peak in terms of flux variabilities and timescales. We find that it is most likely part of the prompt emission, and is explained by the long-acting engine model. This feature is similar to some bright X-ray flares detected in the early afterglow phase of bursts observed by the Swift satellite.
  • In this paper we report strong evidence for a ~304-day periodicity in the spin history of the accretion-powered pulsar GX 1+4 that is very likely to be a signature of the orbital period of the system. Using BATSE public-domain data, we show a highly-significant periodic modulation of the pulsar frequency from 1991 to date which is in excellent agreement with the ephemeris proposed by Cutler, Dennis & Dolan in 1986, which were based on a few events of enhanced spin-up that occurred during the pulsar's spin-up era in the 1970s. Our results indicate that the orbital period of GX 1+4 is 303.8+-1.1 days, making it by far the widest low-mass X-ray binary system known. A likely scenario for this system is an elliptical orbit in which the neutron star decreases its spin-down rate (or even exhibits a momentary spin-up behavior) at periastron passages due to the higher torque exerted by the accretion disk onto the magnetosphere of the neutron star.
  • We report strong evidence for a ~304-day periodicity in the spin history of the accretion-powered pulsar GX1+4 that is most probably associated with the orbital period of the system. We have used data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory to show a clear periodic modulation of the pulsar frequency from 1991 to date, in excellent agreement with the ephemeris proposed by Cutler, Dennis & Dolan (1986). Our results indicate that the orbital period of GX1+4 is 303.8 +- 1.1 days, making it the widest known low-mass X-ray binary system by more than one order of magnitude and putting this long-standing question to rest. A likely scenario for this system is an elliptical orbit in which the neutron star decreases its spin-down rate (or even exhibits a momentary spin-up behavior) at periastron passages due to the higher torque exerted by the accretion disk onto the magnetosphere of the neutron star. These results are not inconsistent with both the X-ray pulsed flux light curve measured by BATSE during the same epoch and the X-ray flux history from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) onboard the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer.