• The large-scale structure of the universe can only be observed via luminous tracers of the dark matter. However, the clustering statistics of tracers are biased and depend on various properties, such as their host-halo mass and assembly history. On very large scales this tracer bias results in a constant offset in the clustering amplitude, known as linear bias. Towards smaller nonlinear scales, this is no longer the case and tracer bias becomes a complicated function of scale and time. We focus on tracer bias centred on cosmic voids, depressions of the density field that spatially dominate the universe. We consider three types of tracers: galaxies, galaxy clusters and AGN, extracted from the hydrodynamical simulation Magneticum Pathfinder. In contrast to common clustering statistics that focus on auto-correlations of tracers, we find that void-tracer cross-correlations are successfully described by a linear-bias relation. The tracer-density profile of voids can thus be related to their matter-density profile by a single number. We show that it coincides with the linear tracer bias extracted from the large-scale auto-correlation function and expectations from theory, if sufficiently large voids are considered. For smaller voids we observe a shift towards higher values. This has important consequences on cosmological parameter inference, as the problem of unknown tracer bias is alleviated up to a constant number. The smallest scales in existing datasets become accessible to simpler models, providing numerous modes of the density field that have been disregarded so far, but may help to further reduce statistical errors in constraining cosmology.
  • We perform a comprehensive redshift-space distortion analysis based on cosmic voids in the large-scale distribution of galaxies observed with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. To this end, we measure multipoles of the void-galaxy cross-correlation function and compare them with standard model predictions in cosmology. Merely considering linear-order theory allows us to accurately describe the data on the entire available range of scales and to probe void-centric distances down to about $2h^{-1}{\rm Mpc}$. Common systematics, such as the Fingers-of-God effect, scale-dependent galaxy bias, and nonlinear clustering do not seem to play a significant role in our analysis. We constrain the growth rate of structure via the redshift-space distortion parameter $\beta$ at two median redshifts, $\beta(\bar{z}=0.32)=0.599^{+0.134}_{-0.124}$ and $\beta(\bar{z}=0.54)=0.457^{+0.056}_{-0.054}$, with a precision that is competitive with state-of-the-art galaxy-clustering results. While the high-redshift constraint perfectly agrees with model expectations, we observe a mild $2\sigma$ deviation at $\bar{z}=0.32$, which increases to $3\sigma$ when the data is restricted to the lowest available redshift range of $0.15<z<0.33$.
  • We present measurements of angular cross power spectra between galaxies and optically-selected galaxy clusters in the final photometric sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We measure the auto- and cross-correlations between galaxy and cluster samples, from which we extract the effective biases and study the shot noise properties. We model the non-Poissonian shot noise by introducing an effective number density of tracers and fit for this quantity. We find that we can only describe the cross-correlation of galaxies and galaxy clusters, as well as the auto-correlation of galaxy clusters, on the relevant scales using a non-Poissonian shot noise contribution. The values of effective bias we finally measure for a volume-limited sample are $b_{cc}=4.09 \pm 0.47$ for the cluster auto-correlation and $b_{gc}=2.15 \pm 0.09$ for the galaxy-cluster cross-correlation. We find that these results are consistent with expectations from the auto-correlations of galaxies and clusters and are in good agreement with previous studies. The main result is two-fold: firstly we provide a measurement of the cross-correlation of galaxies and clusters, which can be used for further cosmological analysis, and secondly we describe an effective treatment of the shot noise.
  • The Universe is mostly composed of large and relatively empty domains known as cosmic voids, whereas its matter content is predominantly distributed along their boundaries. The remaining material inside them, either dark or luminous matter, is attracted to these boundaries and causes voids to expand faster and to grow emptier over time. Using the distribution of galaxies centered on voids identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and adopting minimal assumptions on the statistical motion of these galaxies, we constrain the average matter content $\Omega_\mathrm{m}=0.281\pm0.031$ in the Universe today, as well as the linear growth rate of structure $f/b=0.417\pm0.089$ at median redshift $\bar{z}=0.57$, where $b$ is the galaxy bias ($68\%$ C.L.). These values originate from a percent-level measurement of the anisotropic distortion in the void-galaxy cross-correlation function, $\varepsilon = 1.003\pm0.012$, and are robust to consistency tests with bootstraps of the data and simulated mock catalogs within an additional systematic uncertainty of half that size. They surpass (and are complementary to) existing constraints by unlocking cosmological information on smaller scales through an accurate model of nonlinear clustering and dynamics in void environments. As such, our analysis furnishes a powerful probe of deviations from Einstein's general relativity in the low-density regime which has largely remained untested so far. We find no evidence for such deviations in the data at hand.
  • We present an analysis of a general machine learning technique called 'stacking' for the estimation of photometric redshifts. Stacking techniques can feed the photometric redshift estimate, as output by a base algorithm, back into the same algorithm as an additional input feature in a subsequent learning round. We shown how all tested base algorithms benefit from at least one additional stacking round (or layer). To demonstrate the benefit of stacking, we apply the method to both unsupervised machine learning techniques based on self-organising maps (SOMs), and supervised machine learning methods based on decision trees. We explore a range of stacking architectures, such as the number of layers and the number of base learners per layer. Finally we explore the effectiveness of stacking even when using a successful algorithm such as AdaBoost. We observe a significant improvement of between 1.9% and 21% on all computed metrics when stacking is applied to weak learners (such as SOMs and decision trees). When applied to strong learning algorithms (such as AdaBoost) the ratio of improvement shrinks, but still remains positive and is between 0.4% and 2.5% for the explored metrics and comes at almost no additional computational cost.
  • We showcase machine learning (ML) inspired target selection algorithms to determine which of all potential targets should be selected first for spectroscopic follow up. Efficient target selection can improve the ML redshift uncertainties as calculated on an independent sample, while requiring less targets to be observed. We compare the ML targeting algorithms with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) target order, and with a random targeting algorithm. The ML inspired algorithms are constructed iteratively by estimating which of the remaining target galaxies will be most difficult for the machine learning methods to accurately estimate redshifts using the previously observed data. This is performed by predicting the expected redshift error and redshift offset (or bias) of all of the remaining target galaxies. We find that the predicted values of bias and error are accurate to better than 10-30% of the true values, even with only limited training sample sizes. We construct a hypothetical follow-up survey and find that some of the ML targeting algorithms are able to obtain the same redshift predictive power with 2-3 times less observing time, as compared to that of the SDSS, or random, target selection algorithms. The reduction in the required follow up resources could allow for a change to the follow-up strategy, for example by obtaining deeper spectroscopy, which could improve ML redshift estimates for deeper test data.
  • We present an analysis of anomaly detection for machine learning redshift estimation. Anomaly detection allows the removal of poor training examples, which can adversely influence redshift estimates. Anomalous training examples may be photometric galaxies with incorrect spectroscopic redshifts, or galaxies with one or more poorly measured photometric quantity. We select 2.5 million 'clean' SDSS DR12 galaxies with reliable spectroscopic redshifts, and 6730 'anomalous' galaxies with spectroscopic redshift measurements which are flagged as unreliable. We contaminate the clean base galaxy sample with galaxies with unreliable redshifts and attempt to recover the contaminating galaxies using the Elliptical Envelope technique. We then train four machine learning architectures for redshift analysis on both the contaminated sample and on the preprocessed 'anomaly-removed' sample and measure redshift statistics on a clean validation sample generated without any preprocessing. We find an improvement on all measured statistics of up to 80% when training on the anomaly removed sample as compared with training on the contaminated sample for each of the machine learning routines explored. We further describe a method to estimate the contamination fraction of a base data sample.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the Cosmic Vision 2015 2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • We test the imprint of f(R) modified gravity on the halo mass function, using N-body simulations and a theoretical model developed in (Kopp et al. 2013). We find a very good agreement between theory and simulations. We extend the theoretical model to the conditional mass function and apply it to the prediction of the linear halo bias in f(R) gravity. Using the halo model we obtain a prediction for the non-linear matter power spectrum accurate to ~10% at z=0 and up to k=2h/Mpc. We also study halo profiles for the f(R) models and find a deviation from the standard general relativity result up to 40%, depending on the halo masses and redshift. This has not been pointed out in previous analysis. Finally we study the number density and profiles of voids identified in these f(R) N-body simulations. We underline the effect of the bias and the sampling to identify voids. We find significant deviation from GR when measuring the f(R) void profiles with fR0<-10^{-6}.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • We present analyses of data augmentation for machine learning redshift estimation. Data augmentation makes a training sample more closely resemble a test sample, if the two base samples differ, in order to improve measured statistics of the test sample. We perform two sets of analyses by selecting 800k (1.7M) SDSS DR8 (DR10) galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. We construct a base training set by imposing an artificial r band apparent magnitude cut to select only bright galaxies and then augment this base training set by using simulations and by applying the K-correct package to artificially place training set galaxies at a higher redshift. We obtain redshift estimates for the remaining faint galaxy sample, which are not used during training. We find that data augmentation reduces the error on the recovered redshifts by 40% in both sets of analyses, when compared to the difference in error between the ideal case and the non augmented case. The outlier fraction is also reduced by at least 10% and up to 80% using data augmentation. We finally quantify how the recovered redshifts degrade as one probes to deeper magnitudes past the artificial magnitude limit of the bright training sample. We find that at all apparent magnitudes explored, the use of data augmentation with tree based methods provide a estimate of the galaxy redshift with a negligible bias, although the error on the recovered values increases as we probe to deeper magnitudes. These results have applications for surveys which have a spectroscopic training set which forms a biased sample of all photometric galaxies, for example if the spectroscopic detection magnitude limit is shallower than the photometric limit.
  • We present an analysis of importance feature selection applied to photometric redshift estimation using the machine learning architecture Decision Trees with the ensemble learning routine Adaboost (hereafter RDF). We select a list of 85 easily measured (or derived) photometric quantities (or `features') and spectroscopic redshifts for almost two million galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10. After identifying which features have the most predictive power, we use standard artificial Neural Networks (aNN) to show that the addition of these features, in combination with the standard magnitudes and colours, improves the machine learning redshift estimate by 18% and decreases the catastrophic outlier rate by 32%. We further compare the redshift estimate using RDF with those from two different aNNs, and with photometric redshifts available from the SDSS. We find that the RDF requires orders of magnitude less computation time than the aNNs to obtain a machine learning redshift while reducing both the catastrophic outlier rate by up to 43%, and the redshift error by up to 25%. When compared to the SDSS photometric redshifts, the RDF machine learning redshifts both decreases the standard deviation of residuals scaled by 1/(1+z) by 36% from 0.066 to 0.041, and decreases the fraction of catastrophic outliers by 57% from 2.32% to 0.99%.
  • Any Dark Energy (DE) or Modified Gravity (MG) model that deviates from a cosmological constant requires a consistent treatment of its perturbations, which can be described in terms of an effective entropy perturbation and an anisotropic stress. We have considered a recently proposed generic parameterisation of DE/MG perturbations and compared it to data from the Planck satellite and six galaxy catalogues, including temperature-galaxy (Tg), CMB lensing-galaxy and galaxy-galaxy (gg) correlations. Combining these observables of structure formation with tests of the background expansion allows us to investigate the properties of DE/MG both at the background and the perturbative level. Our constraints on DE/MG are mostly in agreement with the cosmological constant paradigm, while we also find that the constraint on the equation of state w (assumed to be constant) depends on the model assumed for the perturbation evolution. We obtain $w=-0.92^{+0.20}_{-0.16}$ (95% CL; CMB+gg+Tg) in the entropy perturbation scenario; in the anisotropic stress case the result is $w=-0.86^{+0.17}_{-0.16}$. Including the lensing correlations shifts the results towards higher values of w. If we include a prior on the expansion history from recent Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) measurements, we find that the constraints tighten closely around $w=-1$, making it impossible to measure any DE/MG perturbation evolution parameters. If, however, upcoming observations from surveys like DES, Euclid or LSST show indications for a deviation from a cosmological constant, our formalism will be a useful tool towards model selection in the dark sector.
  • The SKA will build upon early detections of the EoR by precursor instruments, such as MWA, PAPER, and LOFAR, and planned instruments, such as HERA, to make the first high signal-to-noise measurements of fluctuations in the 21 cm brightness temperature from both reionization and the cosmic dawn. This will allow both imaging and statistical maps of the 21cm signal at redshifts z = 6 - 27 and constrain the underlying cosmology and evolution of the density field. This era includes nearly 60% of the (in principle) observable volume of the Universe and many more linear modes than the CMB, presenting an opportunity for SKA to usher in a new level of precision cosmology. This optimistic picture is complicated by the need to understand and remove the effect of astrophysics, so that systematics rather than statistics will limit constraints. This chapter describes the cosmological, as opposed to astrophysical, information available to SKA. Key areas for discussion include: cosmological parameters constraints using 21cm fluctuations as a tracer of the density field; lensing of the 21cm signal, constraints on heating via exotic physics such as decaying or annihilating dark matter; impact of fundamental physics such as non-Gaussianity or warm dark matter on the source population; and constraints on the bulk flows arising from the decoupling of baryons and photons at z = 1000. The chapter explores the path to separating cosmology from astrophysics, for example via velocity space distortions and separation in redshift. We discuss new opportunities for extracting cosmology made possible by the sensitivity of SKA Phase 1 and explores the advances achievable with SKA2.
  • We present the clustering of galaxy clusters as a useful addition to the common set of cosmological observables. The clustering of clusters probes the large-scale structure of the Universe, extending galaxy clustering analysis to the high-peak, high-bias regime. Clustering of galaxy clusters complements the traditional cluster number counts and observable-mass relation analyses, significantly improving their constraining power by breaking existing calibration degeneracies. We use the maxBCG galaxy clusters catalogue to constrain cosmological parameters and cross-calibrate the mass-observable relation, using cluster abundances in richness bins and weak-lensing mass estimates. We then add the redshift-space power spectrum of the sample, including an effective modelling of the weakly non-linear contribution and allowing for an arbitrary photometric redshift smoothing. The inclusion of the power spectrum data allows for an improved self-calibration of the scaling relation. We find that the inclusion of the power spectrum typically brings a $\sim 50$ per cent improvement in the errors on the fluctuation amplitude $\sigma_8$ and the matter density $\Omega_{\mathrm{m}}$. Finally, we apply this method to constrain models of the early universe through the amount of primordial non-Gaussianity of the local type, using both the variation in the halo mass function and the variation in the cluster bias. We find a constraint on the amount of skewness $f_{\mathrm{NL}} = 12 \pm 157 $ ($1\sigma$) from the cluster data alone.
  • We compute the critical density of collapse for spherically symmetric overdensities in a class of f(R) modified gravity models. For the first time we evolve the Einstein, scalar field and non-linear fluid equations, making the minimal simplifying assumptions that the metric potentials and scalar field remain quasi-static throughout the collapse. Initially evolving a top hat profile, we find that the density threshold for collapse depends significantly on the initial conditions imposed, specifically the choice of size and shape. By imposing `natural' initial conditions, we obtain a fitting function for the spherical collapse delta_c as a function of collapse redshift, mass of the overdensity and f_{R0}, the background scalar field value at z=0. By extending delta_c into drifting and diffusing barrier within the context of excursion set theory, we obtain a realistic mass function that might be used to confront this class of scalar-tensor models with observations of dark matter halos. The proposed analytic formula for the halo mass function was tested against Monte Carlo random walks for a wide class of moving barriers and can therefore be applied to other modified gravity theories.
  • Cluster abundances are oddly insensitive to canonical early dark energy. Early dark energy with sound speed equal to the speed of light cannot be distinguished from a quintessence model with the equivalent expansion history for $z<2$ but negligible early dark energy density, despite the different early growth rate. However, cold early dark energy, with a sound speed much smaller than the speed of light, can give a detectable signature. Combining cluster abundances with cosmic microwave background power spectra can determine the early dark energy fraction to 0.3 % and distinguish a true sound speed of 0.1 from 1 at 99 % confidence. We project constraints on early dark energy from the Euclid cluster survey, as well as the Dark Energy Survey, using both current and projected Planck CMB data, and assess the impact of cluster mass systematics. We also quantify the importance of dark energy perturbations, and the role of sound speed during a crossing of $w=-1$.
  • We present a comparison of Fisher matrix forecasts for cosmological probes with Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) posterior likelihood estimation methods. We analyse the performance of future Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) stage-III and stage- IV dark-energy surveys using supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations and weak lensing as probes. We concentrate in particular on the dark-energy equation of state parameters w0 and wa. For purely geometrical probes, and especially when marginalising over wa, we find considerable disagreement between the two methods, since in this case the Fisher matrix can not reproduce the highly non-elliptical shape of the likelihood function. More quantitatively, the Fisher method underestimates the marginalized errors for purely geometrical probes between 30%-70%. For cases including structure formation such as weak lensing, we find that the posterior probability contours from the Fisher matrix estimation are in good agreement with the MCMC contours and the forecasted errors only changing on the 5% level. We then explore non-linear transformations resulting in physically-motivated parameters and investigate whether these parameterisations exhibit a Gaussian behaviour. We conclude that for the purely geometrical probes and, more generally, in cases where it is not known whether the likelihood is close to Gaussian, the Fisher matrix is not the appropriate tool to produce reliable forecasts.
  • We investigate the non-linear evolution of the matter power spectrum by using a large set of high-resolution N-body/hydrodynamic simulations. The linear matter power in the initial conditions is consistently modified to accommodate warm dark matter particles which induce a small scale cut-off in the power as compared to standard cold dark matter scenarios. The impact of such thermal relics is addressed at small scales with k > 1 h/Mpc and at z < 5, which are particularly important for the next generation of Lyman-alpha forest, weak lensing and galaxy clustering surveys. We quantify the mass and redshift dependence of the warm dark matter non-linear matter power and we provide a fitting formula which is accurate at the ~2% level below z=3 and for masses m_wdm > 0.5 keV. The role of baryonic physics (cooling, star formation and feedback recipes) on the warm dark matter induced suppression is also quantified. Furthermore, we compare our findings with the halo model and show their impact on the cosmic shear power spectra.
  • Carr and Hawking showed that the proper size of a spherical overdense region surrounded by a flat FRW universe cannot be arbitrarily large as otherwise the region would close up on itself and become a separate universe. From this result they derived a condition connecting size and density of the overdense region ensuring that it is part of our universe. Carr used this condition to obtain an upper bound for the density fluctuation amplitude with the property that for smaller amplitudes the formation of a primordial black hole is possible, while larger ones indicate a separate universe. In contrast, we find that the appearance of a maximum is not a consequence of avoiding separate universes but arises naturally from the geometry of the chosen slicing. Using instead of density a volume fluctuation variable reveals that a fluctuation is a separate universe iff this variable diverges on superhorizon scales. Hence Carr's and Hawking's condition does not pose a physical constraint on density fluctuations. The dynamics of primordial black hole formation with an initial curvature fluctuation amplitude larger than the one corresponding to the maximum density fluctuation amplitude was previously not considered in detail and so we compare it to the well-known case where the amplitude is smaller by presenting embedding and conformal diagrams of both types in dust spacetimes.
  • We investigate potential constraints from cosmic shear on the dark matter particle mass, assuming all dark matter is made up of light thermal relic particles. Given the theoretical uncertainties involved in making cosmological predictions in such warm dark matter scenarios we use analytical fits to linear warm dark matter power spectra and compare (i) the halo model using a mass function evaluated from these linear power spectra and (ii) an analytical fit to the non-linear evolution of the linear power spectra. We optimistically ignore the competing effect of baryons for this work. We find approach (ii) to be conservative compared to approach (i). We evaluate cosmological constraints using these methods, marginalising over four other cosmological parameters. Using the more conservative method we find that a Euclid-like weak lensing survey together with constraints from the Planck cosmic microwave background mission primary anisotropies could achieve a lower limit on the particle mass of 2.5 keV.
  • We examine general physical parameterisations for viable gravitational models in the $f(R)$ framework. This is related to the mass of an additional scalar field, called the scalaron, that is introduced by the theories. Using a simple parameterisation for the scalaron mass $M(a)$ we show there is an exact correspondence between the model and popular parameterisations of the modified Poisson equation $\mu(a,k)$ and the ratio of the Newtonian potentials $\eta(a,k)$. However, by comparing the aforementioned model against other viable scalaron theories we highlight that the common form of $\mu(a,k)$ and $\eta(a,k)$ in the literature does not accurately represent $f(R)$ behaviour. We subsequently construct an improved description for the scalaron mass (and therefore $\mu(a,k)$ and $\eta(a,k)$) which captures their essential features and has benefits derived from a more physical origin. We study the scalaron's observational signatures and show the modification to the background Friedmann equation and CMB power spectrum to be small. We also investigate its effects in the linear and non linear matter power spectrum--where the signatures are evident--thus giving particular importance to weak lensing as a probe of these models. Using this new form, we demonstrate how the next generation Euclid survey will constrain these theories and its complementarity to current solar system tests. In the most optimistic case Euclid, together with a Planck prior, can constrain a fiducial scalaron mass $M_{0} = 9.4 \times 10^{-30}{\rm eV}$ at the $\sim 20 %$ level. However, the decay rate of the scalaron mass, with fiducial value $\nu = 1.5$, can be constrained to $\sim 3%$ uncertainty.
  • We study the evolution of density perturbations for a class of $f(R)$ models which closely mimic $\Lambda$CDM background cosmology. Using the quasi-static approximation, and the fact that these models are equivalent to scalar-tensor gravity, we write the modified Friedmann and cosmological perturbation equations in terms of the mass $M$ of the scalar field. Using the perturbation equations, we then derive an analytic expression for the growth parameter $\gamma$ in terms of $M$, and use our result to reconstruct the linear matter power spectrum. We find that the power spectrum at $z \sim 0$ is characterized by a tilt relative to its General Relativistic form, with increased power on small scales. We discuss how one has to modify the standard, constant $\gamma$ prescription in order to study structure formation for this class of models. Since $\gamma$ is now scale and time dependent, both the amplitude and transfer function associated with the linear matter power spectrum will be modified. We suggest a simple parameterization for the mass of the scalar field, which allows us to calculate the matter power spectrum for a broad class of $f(R)$ models.
  • The idea that we live in a Universe undergoing a period of acceleration is a strongly held notion in cosmology. As this can, potentially, be explained with a modification to General Relativity we look at current cosmological data with the purpose of testing aspects of gravity. Firstly we constrain a phenomenological model (mDGP) motivated by a possible extra dimension. This is characterised by $\alpha$ which interpolates between (LCDM) and (the Dvali Gabadadze Porrati (DGP) model). In addition, we analyse general signatures of modified gravity given by the growth parameter $\gamma$ and power spectrum parameter $\Sigma$. We utilise Weak Lensing data (CFHTLS-wide) in combination with Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAOs) and Supernovae data. We show that current weak lensing data is not yet capable of constraining either model in isolation. However we demonstrate that this probe is highly beneficial, for in combination with BAOs and Supernovae we obtain $\alpha < 0.58$ and $\alpha < 0.91$ at $1\sigma$ and $2\sigma$, respectively. Without the lensing data no constraint is possible. Both analyses disfavour the flat DGP braneworld model ($\alpha = 1$) at over $2\sigma$. We highlight these are insensitive to potential systematics in the lensing data. For the growth signature $\gamma$ we show that, in combination, these probes do not yet have sufficient constraining power. Finally, we look beyond these present capabilities and demonstrate that Euclid, a future weak lensing survey, will deeply probe the nature of gravity. A $1\sigma$ error of 0.104 is found for $\alpha$ ($l_{max} = 500$) whereas for the general modified signatures we forecast $1\sigma$ errors of 0.045 for $\gamma$ and 0.25 for $\Sigma_{0}$ ($l_{max} = 500$), which is further tightened to 0.038 for $\gamma$ and 0.069 for $\Sigma_{0}$ ($l_{max} = 10000$).
  • The Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAOs) or baryon wiggles which are present in the galaxy power spectrum at scales 100-150Mpc/h are powerful features with which to constrain cosmology. The potential of these probes is such that these are now included as primary science goals in the planning of several future galaxy surveys. However, there is not a uniquely defined BAO Method in the literature but a range of implementations. We study the assumptions and cosmological performances of three different BAO methods: the full Fourier space power spectrum [P(k)], the `wiggles only' in Fourier space and the spherical harmonics power spectrum [C(l)]. We contrast the power of each method to constrain cosmology for two fiducial surveys taken from the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) report and equivalent to future ground and space based spectroscopic surveys. We find that, depending on the assumptions used, the dark energy Figure of Merit (FoM) can change by up to a factor of 35 for a given fiducial model and survey. We compare our results with the DETF implementation and, discuss the robustness of each probe, by quantifying the dependence of the FoM with the wavenumber range. The more information used by a method, the higher its statistical performance, but the higher its sensitivity to systematics and implementations details.