• We explore constraints on gauge bosons of a weakly coupled $U(1)_{B-L}$, $U(1)_{L_\mu-L_e}$, $U(1)_{L_e-L_\tau}$ and $U(1)_{L_\mu-L_\tau}$. To do so we apply the full constraining power of experimental bounds derived for a hidden photon of a secluded $U(1)_{X}$ and translate them to the considered gauge groups. In contrast to the secluded hidden photon that acquires universal couplings to charged Standard Model particles through kinetic mixing with the photon, for these gauge groups the couplings to the different Standard Model particles can vary widely. We take finite, computable loop-induced kinetic mixing effects into account, which provide additional sensitivity in a range of experiments. In addition, we collect and extend limits from neutrino experiments as well as astrophysical and cosmological observations and include new constraints from white dwarf cooling. We discuss the reach of future experiments in searching for these gauge bosons.
  • We investigate the phenomenology of QCD axions and axionlike particles in a scenario with two eras of inflation. In particular, we describe the possible solutions for the QCD axion field equation after the second inflation and reheating. We calculate the dilution numerically for QCD axions and give an analytic approximation for axionlike particles. While it has been realised before that such a scenario can dilute the axion energy density and open up the parameter space for the axion decay constant $f_A$, we find that even a small increase in the relative QCD axion energy density is possible.
  • Motivated by cosmological examples we study quantum field theoretical tunnelling from an initial state where the "classical field", i.e. the vacuum expectation value of the field operator is spatially homogeneous but performing a time-dependent oscillation about a local minimum. In particular we estimate both analytically and numerically the exponential contribution to the tunnelling probability. We additionally show that after the tunnelling event, the classical field solution - the so-called "bubble" - mediating the phase transition can either grow or collapse. We present a simple analytical criterium to distinguish between the two behaviours.
  • A plethora of ultraviolet completions of the Standard Model have extra U(1) gauge symmetries. In general, the associated massive $Z^\prime$ gauge boson can mediate flavor-changing neutral current processes at tree level. We consider a situation where the $Z^\prime$ boson couples solely via flavor-changing interactions to quarks and leptons. In this scenario the model parameter space is, in general, quite well constrained by existing flavor bounds. However, we argue that cancellation effects shelter islands in parameter space from strong flavor constraints and that these can be probed by multipurpose collider experiments like ATLAS or CMS as well as LHCb in upcoming runs at the LHC. In still allowed regions of parameter space these scenarios may help to explain the current tension between theory and experiment of $(g-2)_\mu$ as well as a small anomaly in $\tau$ decays.
  • Hidden photon and axion-like dark matter may be detected using spherical reflective surfaces such as dish antenna setups converting some of the dark matter particles into photons and concentrating them on a detector. These setups may be used to perform directional searches measuring the dark matter momentum distribution. We briefly review the photon distribution one expects to detect with such an antenna and directional resolution in ray approximation. Furthermore we consider the regime $m_{DM} \lesssim (R_{sp}\,v_{DM})^{-1}$ where this approximation does not hold anymore due to the photon wavelength exceeding the expected distribution widths. We discuss how this affects the expected distributions and experimental implications.
  • In this paper we argue that monojet and monophoton searches can be a sensitive test of very highly ionizing particles such as particles with charges $\gtrsim 150e$ and more generally particles that do not reach the outer parts of the detector. 8 TeV monojet data from the CMS experiment excludes such objects with masses in the range $\lesssim 650~{\text{GeV}}$ and charges $\gtrsim 100e$. This nicely complements searches for highly ionizing objects at ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb. Expected improvements in these channels will extend the sensitivity range to $m\lesssim 750~{\text{GeV}}$. This search strategy can directly be generalized to other particles that strongly interact with the detector material, such as e.g. magnetic monopoles.
  • Motivated by aLIGO's recent discovery of gravitational waves we discuss signatures of new physics that could be seen at ground and space-based interferometers. We show that a first order phase transition in a dark sector would lead to a detectable gravitational wave signal at future experiments, if the phase transition has occurred at temperatures few orders of magnitude higher than the electroweak scale. The source of gravitational waves in this case is associated with the dynamics of expanding and colliding bubbles in the early universe. At the same time we point out that topological defects, such as dark sector domain walls, may generate a detectable signal already at aLIGO. Both -- bubble and domain wall -- scenarios are sourced by semi-classical configurations of a dark new physics sector. In the first case the gravitational wave signal originates from bubble wall collisions and subsequent turbulence in hot plasma in the early universe, while the second case corresponds to domain walls passing through the interferometer at present and is not related to gravitational waves. We find that aLIGO at its current sensitivity can detect smoking-gun signatures from domain wall interactions, while future proposed experiments including the fifth phase of aLIGO at design sensitivity can probe dark sector phase transitions.
  • Large field inflation is arguably the simplest and most natural variant of slow-roll inflation. Axion monodromy may be the most promising framework for realising this scenario. As one of its defining features, the long-range polynomial potential possesses short-range, instantonic modulations. These can give rise to a series of local minima in the post-inflationary region of the potential. We show that for certain parameter choices the inflaton populates more than one of these vacua inside a single Hubble patch. This corresponds to a dynamical phase decomposition, analogously to what happens in the course of thermal first-order phase transitions. In the subsequent process of bubble wall collisions, the lowest-lying axionic minimum eventually takes over all space. Our main result is that this violent process sources gravitational waves, very much like in the case of a first-order phase transition. We compute the energy density and peak frequency of the signal, which can lie anywhere in the mHz-GHz range, possibly within reach of next-generation interferometers. We also note that this "dynamical phase decomposition" phenomenon and its gravitational wave signal are more general and may apply to other inflationary or reheating scenarios with axions and modulated potentials.
  • Light pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons (pNGBs) such as, e.g.~axion-like particles, that are non-thermally produced via the misalignment mechanism are promising dark matter candidates. An important feature of pNGBs is their periodic potential, whose scale of periodicity controls all their couplings. As a consequence of the periodicity the maximal potential energy is limited and, hence, producing the observed dark matter density poses significant constraints on the allowed masses and couplings. In the presence of a monodromy, the field range as well as the range of the potential can be significantly extended. As we argue in this paper this has important phenomenological consequences. The constraints on the masses and couplings are ameliorated and couplings to Standard Model particles could be significantly stronger, thereby opening up considerable experimental opportunities. Yet, monodromy models can also give rise to new and qualitatively different features. As a remnant of the periodicity the potential can feature pronounced wiggles. When the field is passing through them quantum fluctuations are enhanced and particles with non-vanishing momentum are produced. Here, we perform a first analysis of this effect and delineate under which circumstances this becomes important. We discuss possible cosmological consequences.
  • We discuss the Aharonov-Bohm effect in the presence of hidden photons kinetically mixed with the ordinary electromagnetic photons. The hidden photon field causes a slight phase shift in the observable interference pattern. It is then shown how the limited sensitivity of this experiment can be largely improved. The key observation is that the hidden photon field causes a leakage of the ordinary magnetic field into the supposedly field-free region. The direct measurement of this magnetic field can provide a sensitive experiment with a good discovery potential, particularly below the $\sim$ meV mass range for hidden photons.
  • Dark matter consisting of very light and very weakly interacting particles such as axions, axion-like particles and hidden photons could be detected using reflective surfaces. On such reflectors some of the dark matter particles are converted into photons and, given a suitable geometry, concentrated on the detector. This technique offers sensitivity to the direction of the velocity of the dark matter particles. In this note we investigate how far spherical mirrors can concentrate the generated photons and what this implies for the resolution in directional detection as well as the sensitivity of discovery experiments not aiming for directional resolution. Finally we discuss an improved setup using a combination of a reflecting plane with focussing optics.
  • Recently Graham, Kaplan and Rajendran [1] proposed cosmological relaxation as a mechanism for generating a hierarchically small Higgs vacuum expectation value. Inspired by this we collect some thoughts on steps towards a solution to the electroweak hierarchy problem and apply them to the original model of cosmological relaxation [1]. To do so, we study the dynamics of the model and determine the relation between the fundamental input parameters and the electroweak vacuum expectation value. Depending on the input parameters the model exhibits three qualitatively different regimes, two of which allow for hierarchically small Higgs vacuum expectation values. One leads to standard electroweak symmetry breaking whereas in the other regime electroweak symmetry is mainly broken by a Higgs source term. While the latter is not acceptable in a model based on the QCD axion, in non-QCD models this may lead to new and interesting signatures in Higgs observables.
  • We give a brief update on the search for Hidden Photon Dark Matter with FUNK. The experiment uses a large spherical mirror, which, if Hidden Photon Dark Matter exists in the accessible mass and coupling parameter range, would yield an optical signal in the mirror's center in an otherwise dark environment. After a test run with a CCD, preparations for a run with a low-noise PMT are under way and described in this proceedings.
  • Axion-like particles (ALPs), relatively light (pseudo-)scalars coupled to two gauge bosons, are a common feature of many extensions of the Standard Model. Up to now there has been a gap in the sensitivity to such particles in the MeV to 10 GeV range. In this note we show that LEP data on $Z\to\gamma\gamma$ decays provides significant constraints in this range (and indeed up to the $Z$-mass). We also discuss the sensitivities of LHC and future colliders. Particularly the LHC shows promising sensitivity in searching for a pseudo-scalar with $4 \lesssim m_a \lesssim 60$ GeV in the channel $pp \to 3 \gamma$ with $m_{3\gamma}\approx m_{Z}$.
  • April 19, 2015 hep-ph, hep-ex
    This paper describes the physics case for a new fixed target facility at CERN SPS. The SHiP (Search for Hidden Particles) experiment is intended to hunt for new physics in the largely unexplored domain of very weakly interacting particles with masses below the Fermi scale, inaccessible to the LHC experiments, and to study tau neutrino physics. The same proton beam setup can be used later to look for decays of tau-leptons with lepton flavour number non-conservation, $\tau\to 3\mu$ and to search for weakly-interacting sub-GeV dark matter candidates. We discuss the evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model and describe interactions between new particles and four different portals - scalars, vectors, fermions or axion-like particles. We discuss motivations for different models, manifesting themselves via these interactions, and how they can be probed with the SHiP experiment and present several case studies. The prospects to search for relatively light SUSY and composite particles at SHiP are also discussed. We demonstrate that the SHiP experiment has a unique potential to discover new physics and can directly probe a number of solutions of beyond the Standard Model puzzles, such as neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the Universe, dark matter, and inflation
  • In view of the measured Higgs mass of 125 GeV, the perturbative renormalization group evolution of the Standard Model suggests that our Higgs vacuum might not be stable. We connect the usual perturbative approach and the functional renormalization group which allows for a straightforward inclusion of higher-dimensional operators in the presence of an ultraviolet cutoff. In the latter framework we study vacuum stability in the presence of higher-dimensional operators. We find that their presence can have a sizable influence on the maximum ultraviolet scale of the Standard Model and the existence of instabilities. Finally, we discuss how such operators can be generated in specific models and study the relation between the instability scale of the potential and the scale of new physics required to avoid instabilities.
  • Axions and similar very weakly interacting particles are increasingly compelling candidates for the cold dark matter of the universe. Having very low mass and being produced non-thermally in the early Universe, axions feature extremely high occupation numbers. It has been suggested that this leads to the formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate with potentially significant impact on observation and direct detection experiments. In this note we aim to clarify that if Bose-Einstein condensation occurs for light and very weakly interacting dark matter particles, it does not happen in thermal equilibrium but is described by a far-from-equilibrium state. In particular we point out that the dynamics is characterized by two very different timescales, such that condensation occurs on a much shorter timescale than full thermalization.
  • In very high energy scattering events production of multiple Higgs and electroweak gauge bosons becomes possible. Indeed the perturbative cross section for these processes grows with increasing energy, eventually violating perturbative unitarity. In addition to perturbative unitarity we also examine constraints on high multiplicity processes arising from experimentally measured quantities. These include the shape of the Z-peak and upper limits on scattering cross sections of cosmic rays. We find that the rate of high multiplicity electroweak processes will exceed these upper limits at energies not significantly above what can be currently tested experimentally. This leaves two options: 1) The electroweak sector becomes truly non-perturbative in this regime or 2) Additional physics beyond the Standard Model is needed. In both cases novel physics phenomena must set in before these energies are reached. Based on the measured Higgs mass we estimate the critical energy to be in the range of $10^3$ TeV but we also point out that it can potentially be significantly less than that.
  • The Higgs discovery has given us the Higgs-gauge sector as a new handle to search for physics beyond the Standard Model. This includes physics scenarios originally linked to massive gauge boson scattering at high energies. We investigate how one can separately probe the Higgs couplings to the longitudinal and transverse parts of the massive gauge bosons away from this high-energy limit. Deviations from the Standard Model could originate from higher-dimensional operators, compositeness, or even more fundamentally from a violation of gauge invariance. The signature we propose is the tagging jet kinematics in weak boson scattering for scattering energies close to the Higgs resonance. During the upcoming LHC run at 13 TeV we will be able to test these couplings at the 20% level.
  • One of the simplest extensions of the Standard Model (SM) is an extra U(1) gauge group under which SM matter does not carry any charge. The associated boson -- the hidden photon -- then interacts via kinetic mixing with the ordinary photon. Such hidden photons arise naturally in UV extensions such as string theory, often accompanied by the presence of extra spatial dimensions. In this note we investigate a toy scenario where the hidden photon extends into these extra dimensions. Interaction via kinetic mixing is observable only if the hidden photon is massive. In four dimensions this mass needs to be generated via a Higgs or Stueckelberg mechanism. However, in a situation with compactified extra dimensions there automatically exist massive Kaluza-Klein modes which make the interaction observable. We present phenomenological constraints for our toy model. This example demonstrates that the additional particles arising in a more complete theory can have significant effects on the phenomenology.
  • Recently, indications for an emission line at 3.55 keV have been found in the combined spectra of a large number of galaxy clusters and also in Andromeda. This line could not be identified with any known spectral line. It is tempting to speculate that it has its origin in the decay of a particle contributing all or part of the dark matter. In this note we want to point out that axion-like particles being all or part of the dark matter are an ideal candidate to produce such a feature. More importantly the parameter values necessary are quite feasible in extensions of the Standard Model based on string theory and could be linked up to a variety of other intriguing phenomena, which also potentially allow for new tests of this speculation.
  • Dark matter made from non-thermally produced bosons can have very low, possibly sub-eV masses. Axions and hidden photons are prominent examples of such "dark" very weakly interacting light (slim) particles (WISPs). A suitable mechanism for their non-thermal production is the misalignment mechanism. Their dominant interaction with Standard Model (SM) particles is via photons. In this note we want to go beyond these standard examples and discuss a wide range of scalar and pseudo-scalar bosons interacting with SM matter fermions via derivative interactions. Suitably light candidates arise naturally as pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons. In particular we are interested in examples, inspired by familons, whose interactions have a non-trivial flavor structure.
  • Additional U(1) gauge symmetries and corresponding vector bosons, called hidden photons, interacting with the regular photon via kinetic mixing are well motivated in extensions of the Standard Model. Such extensions often exhibit extra spatial dimensions. In this note we investigate the effects of hidden photons living in extra dimensions. In four dimensions such a hidden photon is only detectable if it has a mass or if there exists additional matter charged under it. We note that in extra dimensions suitable masses for hidden photons are automatically present in form of the Kaluza-Klein tower.
  • Dark matter may consist of light, very weakly interacting bosons, produced non-thermally in the early Universe. Prominent examples of such very weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs) are axions and hidden photons. Direct detection experiments for such particles are based on the conversion of these particles into photons. This can be done in resonant cavities, featuring a resonant enhancement, or by using suitably shaped reflecting surfaces that allow for broadband searches. In this note we want to elucidate the relation between the two setups and study the transition from resonant to broadband searches. This then allows to determine the sensitivity of off-resonance cavity searches for cavities much larger than the wavelength of the generated photons.
  • It is an intriguing possibility that the cold dark matter of the Universe may consist of very light and very weakly interacting particles such as axion(-like particles) and hidden photons. This opens up (but also requires) new techniques for direct detection. One possibility is to use reflecting surfaces to facilitate the conversion of dark matter into photons, which can be concentrated in a detector with a suitable geometry. In this note we show that this technique also allows for directional detection and inference of the full vectorial velocity spectrum of the dark matter particles. We also note that the non-vanishing velocity of dark matter particles is relevant for the conception of (non-directional) discovery experiments and outline relevant features.