• We present Hubble Space Telescope Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer coronagraphic imaging polarimetry of the TW Hydrae protoplanetary disk. These observations simultaneously measure the total and polarized intensity, allowing direct measurement of the polarization fraction across the disk. In accord with the self-shadowing hypothesis recently proposed by Debes et al., we find that the total and polarized intensity of the disk exhibits strong azimuthal asymmetries at projected distances consistent with the previously reported bright and dark ring-shaped structures (~45-99 au). The sinusoidal-like variations possess a maximum brightness at position angles near ~268-300 degrees and are up to ~28% stronger in total intensity. Furthermore, significant radial and azimuthal variations are also detected in the polarization fraction of the disk. In particular, we find that regions of lower polarization fraction are associated with annuli of increased surface brightness, suggesting that the relative proportion of multiple-to-single scattering is greater along the ring and gap structures. Moreover, we find strong (~20%) azimuthal variation in the polarization fraction along the shadowed region of the disk. Further investigation reveals that the azimuthal variation is not the result of disk flaring effects, but instead from a decrease in the relative contribution of multiple-to-single scattering within the shadowed region. Employing a two-layer scattering surface, we hypothesize that the diminished contribution in multiple scattering may result from shadowing by an inclined inner disk, which prevents direct stellar light from reaching the optically thick underlying surface component.
  • As planning for the next generation of high contrast imaging instruments (e.g. WFIRST, HabEx, and LUVOIR, TMT-PFI, EELT-EPICS) matures, and second-generation ground-based extreme adaptive optics facilities (e.g. VLT-SPHERE, Gemini-GPI) are halfway through their principal surveys, it is imperative that the performance of different designs, post-processing algorithms, observing strategies, and survey results be compared in a consistent, statistically robust framework. In this paper, we argue that the current industry standard for such comparisons -- the contrast curve -- falls short of this mandate. We propose a new figure of merit, the "performance map," that incorporates three fundamental concepts in signal detection theory: the true positive fraction (TPF), false positive fraction (FPF), and detection threshold. By supplying a theoretical basis and recipe for generating the performance map, we hope to encourage the widespread adoption of this new metric across subfields in exoplanet imaging.
  • The current generation of ground-based coronagraphic instruments uses deformable mirrors to correct for phase errors and to improve contrast levels at small angular separations. Improving these techniques, several space and ground based instruments are currently developed using two deformable mirrors to correct for both phase and amplitude errors. However, as wavefront control techniques improve, more complex telescope pupil geome- tries (support structures, segmentation) will soon be a limiting factor for these next generation coronagraphic instruments. In this paper we discuss fundamental limits associated with wavefront control with deformable mirrors in high contrast coronagraph. We start with an analytic prescription of wavefront errors, along with their wave- length dependence, and propagate them through coronagraph models. We then consider a few wavefront control architectures, number of deformable mirrors and their placement in the optical train of the instrument, and algorithms that can be used to cancel the starlight scattered by these wavefront errors over a finite bandpass. For each configuration we derive the residual contrast as a function of bandwidth and of the properties of the incoming wavefront. This result has consequences when setting the wavefront requirements, along with the wavefront control architecture of future high contrast instrument both from the ground and from space. In particular we show that these limits can severely affect the effective Outer Working Angle that can be achieved by a given coronagraph instrument.
  • Direct imaging of exoplanet systems requires the use of coronagraphs to reach high contrast levels (10^-8 to 10^-11) at small angular separations (0.1"). However, the performance of these devices is drastically limited by aberrations (in phase or in amplitude, introduced either by atmosphere or by the optics). Coronagraphs must therefore be combined with extreme adaptive optic systems, composed of a focal plane wavefront sensor and of a high order deformable mirror. These adaptive optic systems must reach a residual error in the corrected wavefront of less than 0.1 nm (RMS) with a rate of 1 kHz. In addition, the surface defects of the deformable mirror, inherent from the fabrication process, must be limited in order to avoid the introduction of amplitude aberrations. An experimental high contrast bench has been developed at the Paris Observatory (LESIA). This bench includes a Boston Micromachine deformable mirror composed of 1024 actuators. For a precise analysis of its surface and performance, we characterized this mirror on the interferometric bench developed since 2004 at the Marseille Observatory (LAM). In this paper, we present this interferometric bench as well as the results of the analysis. This will include a precise surface characterization and a description of the behavior of the actuators, on a 10 by 10 actuator range (behavior of a single actuator, study of the cross-talk between neighbor actuators, influence of a stuck actuator) and on full mirror scale (general surface shape).
  • As the performance of coronagraphs improves, the achievable contrast is more and more dependent of the shape of the pupil. The future generation of space and ground based coronagraphic instruments will have to achieve high contrast levels on on-axis and/or segmented telescopes. To correct for the high amplitude aberrations introduced by secondary mirror structures and segmentation of the primary mirror, we explore a two deformable mirror (DM) method. The major difficulty of several DM methods is the non-linear relation linking actuator strokes to the point spread function in the coronagraph focal plane. The Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD) method is achieving this minimization by solving a non linear differential Monge Ampere equation. Once this open loop method have reached the minimum, a close-loop stroke minimization method can be applied to correct for phase and amplitude aberrations to achieve the ultimate contrast. In this paper, I describe the results of the parametric analysis that that I have undertaken on this method. After recalling the principle of the method, I will described the explored parameter space (deformable mirror set-up, shape of the pupil, bandwidth, coronagraph designs). I will precisely described the way I simulated the Vortex coronagraph for this numerical simulation. Finally I will present the preliminary results of this parametric analysis for space telescope pupils only.
  • The current generation of ground-based coronagraphic instruments uses deformable mirrors to correct for phase errors and to improve contrast levels at small angular separations. Improving these techniques, several space and ground based instruments are currently developed using two deformable mirrors to correct for both phase and amplitude errors. However, as wavefront control techniques improve, more complex telescope pupil geometries will soon be a limiting factor for these next generation coronagraphic instru- ments. The technique presented in this proceeding, the Active Correction of Aperture Discontinuities method, is taking advantage of the fact that most future coronagraphic instruments will include two deformable mirrors, and is proposing to find the shapes and actuator movements to correct for the effect introduced by these complex pupil geometries. We here present the results of the parametric analysis realized on the WFIRST pupil for which we obtained high contrast levels with several deformable mirror setups (size, separation between them), coronagraphs (Vortex charge 2, vortex charge 4, APLC) and spectral bandwidths. However, because contrast levels and separation are not the only metrics to maximize the scientific return of an instrument, we also included in this study the influence of these deformable mirror shapes on the throughput of the instrument and sensitivity to pointing jitters. Finally, we present results obtained on another potential space based telescope segmented aperture. The main result of this proceeding is that we now obtain comparable performance than the coronagraphs previously designed for WFIRST. First result from the parametric analysis strongly suggest that the 2 deformable mirror set up (size and distance between them) has a important impact on the performance in contrast and throughput of the final instrument.
  • The increasing complexity of the aperture geometry of the future space- and ground based-telescopes will limit the performance of the next generation of coronagraphic instruments for high contrast imaging of exoplanets. We propose here a new closed-loop optimization technique using two deformable mirrors to correct for the effects of complex apertures on coronagraph performance, alternative to the ACAD technique previously developed by our group. This technique, ACAD-OSM, allows the use of any coronagraphs designed for continuous apertures, with complex, segmented, apertures, maintaining high performance in contrast and throughput. We show the capabilities of this technique on several pupil geometries (segmented LUVOIR type aperture, WFIRST, ELTs) for which we obtained high contrast levels with several deformable mirror setups (size, number of actuators, separation between them), coronagraphs (apodized pupil Lyot and vortex coronagraphs) and spectral bandwidths, which will help us present recommendations for future coronagraphic instruments. We show that this active technique handles, without any revision to the algorithm, changing or unknown optical aberrations or discontinuities in the pupil, including optical design misalignments, missing segments and phase errors.
  • Direct detection is a very promising field in exoplanet science. It allows the detection of companions with large separation and allows their spectral analysis. A few planets have already been detected and are under spectral analysis. But the full spectral characterization of smaller and colder planets requires higher contrast levels over large spectral bandwidths. Coronagraphs can be used to reach these contrasts, but their efficiency is limited by wavefront aberrations. These deformations induce speckles, star lights leaks, in the focal plane after the coronagraph. The wavefront aberrations should be estimated directly in the science image to avoid usual limitations by differential aberrations in classical adaptive optics. In this context, we introduce the Self- Coherent Camera (SCC). The SCC uses the coherence of the star light to produce a spatial modulation of the speckles in the focal plane and estimate the associated electric complex field. Controlling the wavefront with a deformable mirror, high contrasts have already been reached in monochromatic light with this technique. The performance of the current version of the SCC is limited when widening the spectral bandwidth. We will present a theoretical analysis of these issues and their possible solution. Finally, we will present test bench performance in polychromatic light.
  • Direct imaging of exoplanets requires the detection of very faint objects orbiting close to very bright stars. In this context, the SPICES mission was proposed to the European Space Agency for planet characterization at visible wavelength. SPICES is a 1.5m space telescope which uses a coronagraph to strongly attenuate the central source. However, small optical aberrations, which appear even in space telescopes, dramatically decrease coronagraph performance. To reduce these aberrations, we want to estimate, directly on the coronagraphic image, the electric field, and, with the help of a deformable mirror, correct the wavefront upstream of the coronagraph. We propose an instrument, the Self-Coherent Camera (SCC) for this purpose. By adding a small "reference hole" into the Lyot stop, located after the coronagraph, we can produce interferences in the focal plane, using the coherence of the stellar light. We developed algorithms to decode the information contained in these Fizeau fringes and retrieve an estimation of the field in the focal plane. After briefly recalling the SCC principle, we will present the results of a study, based on both experiment and numerical simulation, analyzing the impact of the size of the reference hole.
  • High-contrast imaging and spectroscopy provide unique constraints for exoplanet formation models as well as for planetary atmosphere models. Instrumentation techniques in this field have greatly improved over the last two decades, with the development of stellar coronagraphy, in parallel with specific methods of wavefront sensing and control. Next generation space- and ground-based telescopes will allow the characterization cold solar-system like planets for the first time and maybe even in situ detection of bio-markers. However, the growth of primary mirror diameters, necessary for these detection, comes with an increase of their complexity (segmentation, secondary mirror features). These discontinuities in the aperture can greatly limit the performance of coronagraphic instruments. In this context, we introduced a new technique, Active Correction of Aperture Discontinuities - Optimized Stroke Minimization (ACAD-OSM), to correct for the diffractive effects of aperture discontinuities in the final image plane of a coronagraph, using deformable mirrors. In this paper, we present several tools that can be used to optimize the performance of this technique for its application to future large missions. In particular, we analyze the influence of the deformable setup (size and separating distance) and found that there is an optimal point for this setup, optimizing the performance of the instrument in contrast and throughput while minimizing the strokes applied to the deformable mirrors. These results will help us design future coronagraphic instruments to obtain the best performance.
  • Several coronagraph designs have been proposed over the last two decades to directly image exoplanets. Among these designs, the vector vortex coronagraphs provide theoretically perfect starlight cancellation along with small inner working angles when deployed on telescopes with unobstructed pupils. However, current and planned space missions and ground-based extremely large telescopes present complex pupil geometries, including secondary mirror central obscurations, that prevent vortex coronagraphs from rejecting on-axis sources entirely. Recent solutions combining the vortex phase mask with a ring-apodized pupil have been proposed to circumvent this issue, but provide a limited throughput for vortex charges $>2$. We present a family of pupil plane apodizations that compensate for pupil geometries with circularly symmetric central obstructions caused by on-axis secondary mirrors for charge 2, 4, and 6 vector vortex coronagraphs. These apodizations are derived analytically and allow the vortex coronagraph to retain theoretically perfect nulling in the presence of central obscurations. For a charge 4 vortex, we design polynomial apodization functions assuming a greyscale apodizing filter that represent a substantial gain in throughput over the ring-apodized vortex coronagraph design, while for a charge 6 vortex, we design polynomial apodized vortex coronagraphs that have $\gtrsim 70\%$ total energy throughput for the entire range of central obscuration sizes studied. We propose methods for optimizing apodizations produced with either greyscale apodizing filters or shaped mirrors. We conclude by demonstrating how this design may be combined with apodizations numerically optimized for struts and segment gaps in telescope pupils to design terrestrial exoplanet imagers for complex pupils.
  • The new frontier in the quest for the highest contrast levels in the focal plane of a coronagraph is now the correction of the large diffractive artifacts effects introduced at the science camera by apertures of increasing complexity. The coronagraph for the WFIRST/AFTA mission will be the first of such instruments in space with a two Deformable Mirrors wavefront control system. Regardless of the control algorithm for these multi Deformable Mirrors, they will have to rely on quick and accurate simulation of the propagation effects introduced by the out-of-pupil surface. In the first part of this paper, we present the analytical description of the different approximations to simulate these propagation effects. In Annex A, we prove analytically that, in the special case of surfaces inducing a converging beam, the Fresnel method yields high fidelity for simulations of these effects. We provide numerical simulations showing this effect. In the second part, we use these tools in the framework of the Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities technique (ACAD) applied to pupil geometries similar to WFIRST-AFTA. We present these simulations in the context of the optical layout of the High-contrast imager for Complex Aperture Telescopes, which will test ACAD on a optical bench. The results of this analysis show that using the ACAD method, an apodized pupil lyot coronagraph and the performance of our current deformable mirrors, we are able to obtain, in numerically simulations, a dark hole with an AFTA-like pupil. Our numerical simulation shows that we can obtain contrast better than $2.10^{-9}$ in monochromatic light and better than 3.e-8 with 10% bandwidth between 5 and 14 lambda/D.
  • We present the first images of four debris disks observed in scattered light around the young (4--250 Myr old) M dwarfs TWA 7 and TWA 25, the K6 star HD 35650, and the G2 star HD 377. We obtained these images by reprocessing archival Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS coronagraph data with modern post-processing techniques as part of the Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE) program. All four disks appear faint and compact compared with other debris disks resolved in scattered light. The disks around TWA 25, HD 35650, and HD 377 appear very inclined, while TWA 7's disk is viewed nearly face-on. The surface brightness of HD 35650's disk is strongly asymmetric. These new detections raise the number of disks resolved in scattered light around M and late-K stars from one (the AU Mic system) to four. This new sample of resolved disks enables comparative studies of heretofore scarce debris disks around low-mass stars relative to solar-type stars.
  • The coronagraphic instrument currently proposed for the WFIRST-AFTA mission will be the first example of a space-based coronagraph optimized for extremely high contrasts that are required for the direct imaging of exoplanets reflecting the light of their host star. While the design of this instrument is still in progress, this early stage of development is a particularly beneficial time to consider the operation of such an instrument. In this paper, we review current or planned operations on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) with a focus on which operational aspects will have relevance to the planned WFIRST-AFTA coronagraphic instrument. We identify five key aspects of operations that will require attention: 1) detector health and evolution, 2) wavefront control, 3) observing strategies/post-processing, 4) astrometric precision/target acquisition, and 5) polarimetry. We make suggestions on a path forward for each of these items.
  • Context. In the context of direct imaging of exoplanets, coronagraphs are commonly proposed to reach the required very high contrast levels. However, wavefront aberrations induce speckles in their focal plane and limit their performance. Aims. An active correction of these wavefront aberrations using a deformable mirror upstream of the coronagraph is mandatory. These aberrations need to be calibrated and focal-plane wavefront-sensing techniques in the science channel are being developed. One of these, the self-coherent camera, of which we present the latest laboratory results. Methods. We present here an enhancement of the method: we directly minimized the complex amplitude of the speckle field in the focal plane. Laboratory tests using a four-quadrant phase-mask coronagraph and a 32x32 actuator deformable mirror were conducted in monochromatic light and in polychromatic light for different bandwidths. Results. We obtain contrast levels in the focal plane in monochromatic light better than 3.10^-8 (RMS) in the 5 - 12 {\lambda}/D region for a correction of both phase and amplitude aberrations. In narrow bands (10 nm) the contrast level is 4.10^-8 (RMS) in the same region. Conclusions. The contrast level is currently limited by the amplitude aberrations on the bench. We identified several improvements that can be implemented to enhance the performance of our optical bench in monochromatic as well as in polychromatic light.