• Geometric inhomogeneous random graphs (GIRGs) are a model for scale-free networks with underlying geometry. We study bootstrap percolation on these graphs, which is a process modelling the spread of an infection of vertices starting within a (small) local region. We show that the process exhibits a phase transition in terms of the initial infection rate in this region. We determine the speed of the process in the supercritical case, up to lower order terms, and show that its evolution is fundamentally influenced by the underlying geometry. For vertices with given position and expected degree, we determine the infection time up to lower order terms. Finally, we show how this knowledge can be used to contain the infection locally by removing relatively few edges from the graph. This is the first time that the role of geometry on bootstrap percolation is analysed mathematically for geometric scale-free networks.
  • In Chung-Lu random graphs, a classic model for real-world networks, each vertex is equipped with a weight drawn from a power-law distribution, and two vertices form an edge independently with probability proportional to the product of their weights. Chung-Lu graphs have average distance O(log log n) and thus reproduce the small-world phenomenon, a key property of real-world networks. Modern, more realistic variants of this model also equip each vertex with a random position in a specific underlying geometry. The edge probability of two vertices then depends, say, inversely polynomial on their distance. In this paper we study a generic augmented version of Chung-Lu random graphs. We analyze a model where the edge probability of two vertices can depend arbitrarily on their positions, as long as the marginal probability of forming an edge (for two vertices with fixed weights, one fixed position, and one random position) is as in Chung-Lu random graphs. The resulting class contains Chung-Lu random graphs, hyperbolic random graphs, and geometric inhomogeneous random graphs as special cases. Our main result is that every random graph model in this general class has the same average distance as Chung-Lu random graphs, up to a factor 1+o(1). This shows in particular that specific choices, such as the underlying geometry being Euclidean or the dependence on the distance being inversely polynomial, do not significantly influence the average distance. The proof also yields that our model has a giant component and polylogarithmic diameter with high probability.
  • We study the Moran process as adapted by Lieberman, Hauert and Nowak. This is a model of an evolving population on a graph or digraph where certain individuals, called "mutants" have fitness r and other individuals, called non-mutants have fitness 1. We focus on the situation where the mutation is advantageous, in the sense that r>1. A family of digraphs is said to be strongly amplifying if the extinction probability tends to 0 when the Moran process is run on digraphs in this family. The most-amplifying known family of digraphs is the family of megastars of Galanis et al. We show that this family is optimal, up to logarithmic factors, since every strongly-connected n-vertex digraph has extinction probability Omega(n^(-1/2)). Next, we show that there is an infinite family of undirected graphs, called dense incubators, whose extinction probability is O(n^(-1/3)). We show that this is optimal, up to constant factors. Finally, we introduce sparse incubators, for varying edge density, and show that the extinction probability of these graphs is O(n/m), where m is the number of edges. Again, we show that this is optimal, up to constant factors.
  • It is known that the evolutionary algorithm $(1+1)$-EA with mutation rate $c/n$ optimises every monotone function efficiently if $c<1$, and needs exponential time on some monotone functions (HotTopic functions) if $c\geq 2.2$. We study the same question for a large variety of algorithms, particularly for $(1+\lambda)$-EA, $(\mu+1)$-EA, $(\mu+1)$-GA, their fast counterparts like fast $(1+1)$-EA, and for $(1+(\lambda,\lambda))$-GA. We find that all considered mutation-based algorithms show a similar dichotomy for HotTopic functions, or even for all monotone functions. For the $(1+(\lambda,\lambda))$-GA, this dichotomy is in the parameter $c\gamma$, which is the expected number of bit flips in an individual after mutation and crossover, neglecting selection. For the fast algorithms, the dichotomy is in $m_2/m_1$, where $m_1$ and $m_2$ are the first and second falling moment of the number of bit flips. Surprisingly, the range of efficient parameters is not affected by either population size $\mu$ nor by the offspring population size $\lambda$. The picture changes completely if crossover is allowed. The genetic algorithms $(\mu+1)$-GA and fast $(\mu+1)$-GA are efficient for arbitrary mutations strengths if $\mu$ is large enough.
  • We study sorting of permutations by random swaps if each comparison gives the wrong result with some fixed probability $p<1/2$. We use this process as prototype for the behaviour of randomized, comparison-based optimization heuristics in the presence of noisy comparisons. As quality measure, we compute the expected fitness of the stationary distribution. To measure the runtime, we compute the minimal number of steps after which the average fitness approximates the expected fitness of the stationary distribution. We study the process where in each round a random pair of elements at distance at most $r$ are compared. We give theoretical results for the extreme cases $r=1$ and $r=n$, and experimental results for the intermediate cases. We find a trade-off between faster convergence (for large $r$) and better quality of the solution after convergence (for small $r$).
  • One of the easiest randomized greedy optimization algorithms is the following evolutionary algorithm which aims at maximizing a boolean function $f:\{0,1\}^n \to {\mathbb R}$. The algorithm starts with a random search point $\xi \in \{0,1\}^n$, and in each round it flips each bit of $\xi$ with probability $c/n$ independently at random, where $c>0$ is a fixed constant. The thus created offspring $\xi'$ replaces $\xi$ if and only if $f(\xi') \ge f(\xi)$. The analysis of the runtime of this simple algorithm on monotone and on linear functions turned out to be highly non-trivial. In this paper we review known results and provide new and self-contained proofs of partly stronger results.
  • We present a tight analysis for the well-studied randomized 3-majority dynamics of stabilizing consensus, hence answering the main open question of Becchetti et al. [SODA'16]. Consider a distributed system of n nodes, each initially holding an opinion in {1, 2, ..., k}. The system should converge to a setting where all (non-corrupted) nodes hold the same opinion. This consensus opinion should be \emph{valid}, meaning that it should be among the initially supported opinions, and the (fast) convergence should happen even in the presence of a malicious adversary who can corrupt a bounded number of nodes per round and in particular modify their opinions. A well-studied distributed algorithm for this problem is the 3-majority dynamics, which works as follows: per round, each node gathers three opinions --- say by taking its own and two of other nodes sampled at random --- and then it sets its opinion equal to the majority of this set; ties are broken arbitrarily, e.g., towards the node's own opinion. Becchetti et al. [SODA'16] showed that the 3-majority dynamics converges to consensus in O((k^2\sqrt{\log n} + k\log n)(k+\log n)) rounds, even in the presence of a limited adversary. We prove that, even with a stronger adversary, the convergence happens within O(k\log n) rounds. This bound is known to be optimal.
  • Real-world networks, like social networks or the internet infrastructure, have structural properties such as large clustering coefficients that can best be described in terms of an underlying geometry. This is why the focus of the literature on theoretical models for real-world networks shifted from classic models without geometry, such as Chung-Lu random graphs, to modern geometry-based models, such as hyperbolic random graphs. With this paper we contribute to the theoretical analysis of these modern, more realistic random graph models. Instead of studying directly hyperbolic random graphs, we use a generalization that we call geometric inhomogeneous random graphs (GIRGs). Since we ignore constant factors in the edge probabilities, GIRGs are technically simpler (specifically, we avoid hyperbolic cosines), while preserving the qualitative behaviour of hyperbolic random graphs, and we suggest to replace hyperbolic random graphs by this new model in future theoretical studies. We prove the following fundamental structural and algorithmic results on GIRGs. (1) As our main contribution we provide a sampling algorithm that generates a random graph from our model in expected linear time, improving the best-known sampling algorithm for hyperbolic random graphs by a substantial factor O(n^0.5). (2) We establish that GIRGs have clustering coefficients in {\Omega}(1), (3) we prove that GIRGs have small separators, i.e., it suffices to delete a sublinear number of edges to break the giant component into two large pieces, and (4) we show how to compress GIRGs using an expected linear number of bits.
  • The algorithmic small-world phenomenon, empirically established by Milgram's letter forwarding experiments from the 60s, was theoretically explained by Kleinberg in 2000. However, from today's perspective his model has several severe shortcomings that limit the applicability to real-world networks. In order to give a more convincing explanation of the algorithmic small-world phenomenon, we study decentralized greedy routing in a more flexible random graph model (geometric inhomogeneous random graphs) which overcomes all previous shortcomings. Apart from exhibiting good properties in theory, it has also been extensively experimentally validated that this model reasonably captures real-world networks. In this model, the greedy routing protocol is purely distributed as each vertex only needs to know information about its direct neighbors. We prove that it succeeds with constant probability, and in case of success almost surely finds an almost shortest path of length {\theta}(loglog n), where our bound is tight including the leading constant. Moreover, we study natural local patching methods which augment greedy routing by backtracking and which do not require any global knowledge. We show that such methods can ensure success probability 1 in an asymptotically tight number of steps. These results also address the question of Krioukov et al. whether there are efficient local routing protocols for the internet graph. There were promising experimental studies, but the question remained unsolved theoretically. Our results give for the first time a rigorous and analytical affirmative answer.
  • One important goal of black-box complexity theory is the development of complexity models allowing to derive meaningful lower bounds for whole classes of randomized search heuristics. Complementing classical runtime analysis, black-box models help us understand how algorithmic choices such as the population size, the variation operators, or the selection rules influence the optimization time. One example for such a result is the $\Omega(n \log n)$ lower bound for unary unbiased algorithms on functions with a unique global optimum [Lehre/Witt, GECCO 2010], which tells us that higher arity operators or biased sampling strategies are needed when trying to beat this bound. In lack of analyzing techniques, almost no non-trivial bounds are known for other restricted models. Proving such bounds therefore remains to be one of the main challenges in black-box complexity theory. With this paper we contribute to our technical toolbox for lower bound computations by proposing a new type of information-theoretic argument. We regard the permutation- and bit-invariant version of \textsc{LeadingOnes} and prove that its (1+1) elitist black-box complexity is $\Omega(n^2)$, a bound that is matched by (1+1)-type evolutionary algorithms. The (1+1) elitist complexity of \textsc{LeadingOnes} is thus considerably larger than its unrestricted one, which is known to be of order $n\log\log n$ [Afshani et al., 2013].
  • We study randomized algorithms for constrained optimization, in abstract frameworks that include, in strictly increasing generality: convex programming; LP-type problems; violator spaces; and a setting we introduce, consistent spaces. Such algorithms typically involve a step of finding the optimal solution for a random sample of the constraints. They exploit the condition that, in finite dimension $\delta$, this sample optimum violates a provably small expected fraction of the non-sampled constraints, with the fraction decreasing in the sample size~$r$. We extend such algorithms by considering the technique of removal, where a fixed number $k$ of constraints are removed from the sample according to a fixed rule, with the goal of improving the solution quality. This may have the effect of increasing the number of violated non-sampled constraints. We study this increase, and bound it in a variety of general settings. This work is motivated by, and extends, results on removal as proposed for chance-constrained optimization. For many relevant values of $r$, $\delta$, and $k$, we prove matching upper and lower bounds for the expected number of constraints violated by a random sample, after the removal of $k$ constraints. For a large range of values of $k$, the new upper bounds improve the previously best bounds for LP-type problems, which moreover had only been known in special cases, and not in the generality we consider. Moreover, we show that our results extend from finite to infinite spaces, for chance-constrained optimization.
  • Black-box complexity studies lower bounds for the efficiency of general-purpose black-box optimization algorithms such as evolutionary algorithms and other search heuristics. Different models exist, each one being designed to analyze a different aspect of typical heuristics such as the memory size or the variation operators in use. While most of the previous works focus on one particular such aspect, we consider in this work how the combination of several algorithmic restrictions influence the black-box complexity. Our testbed are so-called OneMax functions, a classical set of test functions that is intimately related to classic coin-weighing problems and to the board game Mastermind. We analyze in particular the combined memory-restricted ranking-based black-box complexity of OneMax for different memory sizes. While its isolated memory-restricted as well as its ranking-based black-box complexity for bit strings of length $n$ is only of order $n/\log n$, the combined model does not allow for algorithms being faster than linear in $n$, as can be seen by standard information-theoretic considerations. We show that this linear bound is indeed asymptotically tight. Similar results are obtained for other memory- and offspring-sizes. Our results also apply to the (Monte Carlo) complexity of OneMax in the recently introduced elitist model, in which only the best-so-far solution can be kept in the memory. Finally, we also provide improved lower bounds for the complexity of OneMax in the regarded models. Our result enlivens the quest for natural evolutionary algorithms optimizing OneMax in $o(n \log n)$ iterations.
  • Black-box complexity theory provides lower bounds for the runtime of black-box optimizers like evolutionary algorithms and serves as an inspiration for the design of new genetic algorithms. Several black-box models covering different classes of algorithms exist, each highlighting a different aspect of the algorithms under considerations. In this work we add to the existing black-box notions a new \emph{elitist black-box model}, in which algorithms are required to base all decisions solely on (a fixed number of) the best search points sampled so far. Our model combines features of the ranking-based and the memory-restricted black-box models with elitist selection. We provide several examples for which the elitist black-box complexity is exponentially larger than that the respective complexities in all previous black-box models, thus showing that the elitist black-box complexity can be much closer to the runtime of typical evolutionary algorithms. We also introduce the concept of $p$-Monte Carlo black-box complexity, which measures the time it takes to optimize a problem with failure probability at most $p$. Even for small~$p$, the $p$-Monte Carlo black-box complexity of a function class $\mathcal F$ can be smaller by an exponential factor than its typically regarded Las Vegas complexity (which measures the \emph{expected} time it takes to optimize $\mathcal F$).
  • Bootstrap percolation is a prominent framework for studying the spreading of activity on a graph. We begin with an initial set of active vertices. The process then proceeds in rounds, and further vertices become active as soon as they have a certain number of active neighbors. A recurring feature in bootstrap percolation theory is an `all-or-nothing' phenomenon: either the size of the starting set is so small that the process stops very soon, or it percolates (almost) completely. Motivated by several important phenomena observed in various types of real-world networks we propose in this work a variant of bootstrap percolation that exhibits a vastly different behavior. Our graphs have two types of vertices: some of them obstruct the diffusion, while the others facilitate it. We study the effect of this setting by analyzing the process on Erd\H{o}s-R\'enyi random graphs. Our main findings are two-fold. First we show that the presence of vertices hindering the diffusion does not result in a stable behavior: tiny changes in the size of the starting set can dramatically influence the size of the final active set. In particular, the process is non-monotone: a larger starting set can result in a smaller final set. In the second part of the paper we show that this phenomenom arises from the round-based approach: if we move to a continuous time model in which every edge draws its transmission time randomly, then we gain stability, and the process stops with an active set that contains a non-trivial constant fraction of all vertices. Moreover, we show that in the continuous time model percolation occurs significantly faster compared to the classical round-based model. Our findings are in line with empirical observations and demonstrate the importance of introducing various types of vertex behaviors in the mathematical model.
  • In an Achlioptas process, starting with a graph that has n vertices and no edge, in each round $d \geq 1$ edges are drawn uniformly at random, and using some rule exactly one of them is chosen and added to the evolving graph. For the class of Achlioptas processes we investigate how much impact the rule has on one of the most basic properties of a graph: connectivity. Our main results are twofold. First, we study the prominent class of bounded size rules, which select the edge to add according to the component sizes of its vertices, treating all sizes larger than some constant equally. For such rules we provide a fine analysis that exposes the limiting distribution of the number of rounds until the graph gets connected, and we give a detailed picture of the dynamics of the formation of the single component from smaller components. Second, our results allow us to study the connectivity transition of all Achlioptas processes, in the sense that we identify a process that accelerates it as much as possible.
  • Black-box complexity is a complexity theoretic measure for how difficult a problem is to be optimized by a general purpose optimization algorithm. It is thus one of the few means trying to understand which problems are tractable for genetic algorithms and other randomized search heuristics. Most previous work on black-box complexity is on artificial test functions. In this paper, we move a step forward and give a detailed analysis for the two combinatorial problems minimum spanning tree and single-source shortest paths. Besides giving interesting bounds for their black-box complexities, our work reveals that the choice of how to model the optimization problem is non-trivial here. This in particular comes true where the search space does not consist of bit strings and where a reasonable definition of unbiasedness has to be agreed on.
  • The Cohen-Lenstra heuristic is a universal principle that assigns to each group a probability that tells how often this group should occur "in nature". The most important, but not the only, applications are sequences of class groups, which behave like random sequences of groups with respect to the so-called Cohen-Lenstra probability measure. So far, it was only possible to define this probability measure for finite abelian $p$-groups. We prove that it is also possible to define an analogous probability measure on the set of \emph{all} finite abelian groups when restricting to the $\Sigma$-algebra on the set of all finite abelian groups that is generated by uniform properties, thereby solving a problem that was open since 1984.
  • In number theory, great efforts have been undertaken to study the Cohen-Lenstra probability measure on the set of all finite abelian $p$-groups. On the other hand, group theorists have studied a probability measure on the set of all partitions induced by the probability that a randomly chosen $n\times n$-matrix over $\FF_p$ is contained in a conjucagy class associated with this partitions, for $n \to \infty$. This paper shows that both probability measures are identical. As a consequence, a multitide of results can be transferred from each theory to the other one. The paper contains a survey about the known methods to study the probability measure and about the results that have been obtained so far, from both communities.