• Neural networks modularity is a major challenge for the development of control circuits of neural activity. Under physiological limitations, the accessible regions for external stimulation are possibly different from the functionally relevant ones, requiring complex indirect control designs. Moreover, control over one region might affect activity of other downstream networks, once sparse connections exist. We address these questions by developing a hybrid device of a cortical culture functionally integrated with a biomimetic hardware neural network. This design enables the study of modular networks controllability, while connectivity is well-defined and key features of cortical networks are accessible. Using a closed-loop control to monitor the activity of the coupled hybrid, we show that both modules are congruently modified, in the macroscopic as well as the microscopic activity levels. Control impacts efficiently the activity on both sides whether the control circuit is an indirect series one, or implemented independently only on one of the modules. Hence, these results present global functional impacts of a local control intervention. Overall, this strategy provides an experimental access to the controllability of neural activity irregularities, when embedded in a modular organization.
  • Despite being originally inspired by the central nervous system, artificial neural networks have diverged from their biological archetypes as they have been remodeled to fit particular tasks. In this paper, we review several possibilites to reverse map these architectures to biologically more realistic spiking networks with the aim of emulating them on fast, low-power neuromorphic hardware. Since many of these devices employ analog components, which cannot be perfectly controlled, finding ways to compensate for the resulting effects represents a key challenge. Here, we discuss three different strategies to address this problem: the addition of auxiliary network components for stabilizing activity, the utilization of inherently robust architectures and a training method for hardware-emulated networks that functions without perfect knowledge of the system's dynamics and parameters. For all three scenarios, we corroborate our theoretical considerations with experimental results on accelerated analog neuromorphic platforms.
  • Emulating spiking neural networks on analog neuromorphic hardware offers several advantages over simulating them on conventional computers, particularly in terms of speed and energy consumption. However, this usually comes at the cost of reduced control over the dynamics of the emulated networks. In this paper, we demonstrate how iterative training of a hardware-emulated network can compensate for anomalies induced by the analog substrate. We first convert a deep neural network trained in software to a spiking network on the BrainScaleS wafer-scale neuromorphic system, thereby enabling an acceleration factor of 10 000 compared to the biological time domain. This mapping is followed by the in-the-loop training, where in each training step, the network activity is first recorded in hardware and then used to compute the parameter updates in software via backpropagation. An essential finding is that the parameter updates do not have to be precise, but only need to approximately follow the correct gradient, which simplifies the computation of updates. Using this approach, after only several tens of iterations, the spiking network shows an accuracy close to the ideal software-emulated prototype. The presented techniques show that deep spiking networks emulated on analog neuromorphic devices can attain good computational performance despite the inherent variations of the analog substrate.
  • A switched-capacitor (SC) neuromorphic system for closed-loop neural coupling in 28 nm CMOS is presented, occupying 600 um by 600 um. It offers 128 input channels (i.e. presynaptic terminals), 8192 synapses and 64 output channels (i.e. neurons). Biologically realistic neuron and synapse dynam- ics are achieved via a faithful translation of the behavioural equations to SC circuits. As leakage currents significantly affect circuit behaviour at this technology node, dedicated compensation techniques are employed to achieve biological-realtime operation, with faithful reproduction of time constants of several 100 ms at room temperature. Power draw of the overall system is 1.9 mW.
  • Synaptic dynamics, such as long- and short-term plasticity, play an important role in the complexity and biological realism achievable when running neural networks on a neuromorphic IC. For example, they endow the IC with an ability to adapt and learn from its environment. In order to achieve the mil- lisecond to second time constants required for these synaptic dynamics, analog subthreshold circuits are usually employed. However, due to process variation and leakage problems, it is almost impossible to port these types of circuits to modern sub-100nm technologies. In contrast, we present a neuromor- phic system in a 28 nm CMOS process that employs switched capacitor (SC) circuits to implement 128 short term plasticity presynapses as well as 8192 stop-learning synapses. The neuromorphic system consumes an area of 0.36 mm2 and runs at a power consumption of 1.9 mW. The circuit makes use of a technique for minimizing leakage effects allowing for real-time operation with time constants up to sev- eral seconds. Since we rely on SC techniques for all calculations, the system is composed of only generic mixed-signal building blocks. These generic building blocks make the system easy to port between technologies and the large digital circuit part inherent in an SC system benefits fully from technology scaling.
  • Generating an exponential decay function with a time constant on the order of hundreds of milliseconds is a mainstay for neuromorphic circuits. Usually, either subthreshold circuits or RC-decays based on transconductance amplifiers are used. In the latter case, transconductances in the 10 pS range are needed. However, state-of-the-art low-transconductance amplifiers still require too much circuit area to be applicable in neuromorphic circuits where >100 of these time constant circuits may be required on a single chip. We present a silicon verified operational transconductance amplifier that achieves a gm of 5 pS in only 700 {\mu}m2, a factor of 10-100 less area than current examples. This allows a high-density integration of time constant circuits in target appliations such as synaptic learning or as driving circuit for neuromorphic memristor arrays.
  • In this paper we present a methodological framework that meets novel requirements emerging from upcoming types of accelerated and highly configurable neuromorphic hardware systems. We describe in detail a device with 45 million programmable and dynamic synapses that is currently under development, and we sketch the conceptual challenges that arise from taking this platform into operation. More specifically, we aim at the establishment of this neuromorphic system as a flexible and neuroscientifically valuable modeling tool that can be used by non-hardware-experts. We consider various functional aspects to be crucial for this purpose, and we introduce a consistent workflow with detailed descriptions of all involved modules that implement the suggested steps: The integration of the hardware interface into the simulator-independent model description language PyNN; a fully automated translation between the PyNN domain and appropriate hardware configurations; an executable specification of the future neuromorphic system that can be seamlessly integrated into this biology-to-hardware mapping process as a test bench for all software layers and possible hardware design modifications; an evaluation scheme that deploys models from a dedicated benchmark library, compares the results generated by virtual or prototype hardware devices with reference software simulations and analyzes the differences. The integration of these components into one hardware-software workflow provides an ecosystem for ongoing preparative studies that support the hardware design process and represents the basis for the maturity of the model-to-hardware mapping software. The functionality and flexibility of the latter is proven with a variety of experimental results.