• Tensor models generalize the matrix-model approach to 2-dimensional quantum gravity to higher dimensions. Some models allowing a $1/N$ expansion have been explored, most of them generating branched-polymer geometries. Recently, enhancements yielding an additional 2d quantum-gravity (planar) phase and an intermediate regime of proliferating baby-universes have been found. It remains an open issue to find models escaping these lower dimensionality universality classes. Here we analyse the dominant regime and critical behaviour of a range of new models which are candidates for such effective geometries, in particular interactions based on the utility graph $K_{3,3}$. We find that, upon proper enhancement, the two-phase structure of a branched-polymer and a 2d gravity regime is the common case in $U(N)$-invariant rank $D=4$ tensor models of small orders. Not only the well known so-called necklace interactions but also $K_{3,3}$-type interactions turn out as the source for the planar regime. We give a systematic account of the enhancement scaling, the counting of leading-order diagrams and the multi-critical behaviour of a wide range of interactions, in particular for all order-6 interactions of rank 3 and 4. These findings support the claim of universality of such mixtures of branched-polymer and planar diagrams at criticality. In particular, this hints at the necessity to consider new ingredients, or interactions of higher order and rank, in order to obtain higher dimensional continuum geometry from tensor models.
  • The spectral dimension has proven to be a very informative observable to understand the properties of quantum geometries in approaches to quantum gravity. In loop quantum gravity and its spin foam description, it has not been possible so far to calculate the spectral dimension of spacetime. As a first step towards this goal, here we determine the spacetime spectral dimension in the simplified spin foam model restricted to hypercuboids. Using Monte Carlo methods we compute the spectral dimension for state sums over periodic spin foam configurations on infinite lattices. For given periodicity, i.e. number of degrees of freedom, we find a range of scale where an intermediate spectral dimension between 0 and 4 can be found, continuously depending on the parameter of the model. Under an assumption on the statistical behaviour of the Laplacian we can explain these results analytically. This allows us to take the thermodynamic limit of large periodicity and find a phase transition from a regime of effectively 0-dimensional to 4-dimensional spacetime. At the point of phase transition, dynamics of the model are scale invariant which can be seen as restoration of diffeomorphism invariance of flat space. Considering the spectral dimension as an order parameter for renormalization we find a renormalization group flow to this point as well. Being the first instance of an emergence of 4-dimensional spacetime in a spin foam model, the properties responsible for this result seem to be rather generic. We thus expect similar results for more general, less restricted spin foam models.
  • In several approaches towards a quantum theory of gravity, such as group field theory and loop quantum gravity, quantum states and histories of the geometric degrees of freedom turn out to be based on discrete spacetime. The most pressing issue is then how the smooth geometries of general relativity, expressed in terms of suitable geometric observables, arise from such discrete quantum geometries in some semiclassical and continuum limit. In this thesis I tackle the question of suitable observables focusing on the effective dimension of discrete quantum geometries. For this purpose I give a purely combinatorial description of the discrete structures which these geometries have support on. As a side topic, this allows to present an extension of group field theory to cover the combinatorially larger kinematical state space of loop quantum gravity. Moreover, I introduce a discrete calculus for fields on such fundamentally discrete geometries with a particular focus on the Laplacian. This permits to define the effective-dimension observables for quantum geometries. Analysing various classes of quantum geometries, I find as a general result that the spectral dimension is more sensitive to the underlying combinatorial structure than to the details of the additional geometric data thereon. Semiclassical states in loop quantum gravity approximate the classical geometries they are peaking on rather well and there are no indications for stronger quantum effects. On the other hand, in the context of a more general model of states which are superposition over a large number of complexes, based on analytic solutions, there is a flow of the spectral dimension from the topological dimension $d$ on low energy scales to a real number $0<\alpha<d$ on high energy scales. In the particular case of $\alpha=1$ these results allow to understand the quantum geometry as effectively fractal.
  • Group field theories are a generalization of matrix models which provide both a second quantized reformulation of loop quantum gravity as well as generating functions for spin foam models. While states in canonical loop quantum gravity, in the traditional continuum setting, are based on graphs with vertices of arbitrary valence, group field theories have been defined so far in a simplicial setting such that states have support only on graphs of fixed valency. This has led to the question whether group field theory can indeed cover the whole state space of loop quantum gravity. In this contribution based on [1] I present two new classes of group field theories which satisfy this objective: i) a straightforward, but rather formal generalization to multiple fields, one for each valency and ii) a simplicial group field theory which effectively covers the larger state space through a dual weighting, a technique common in matrix and tensor models. To this end I will further discuss in some detail the combinatorial structure of the complexes generated by the group field theory partition function. The new group field theories do not only strengthen the links between the mentioned quantum gravity approaches but, broadening the theory space of group field theories, they might also prove useful in the investigation of renormalizability.
  • In various theories of quantum gravity, one observes a change in the spectral dimension from the topological spatial dimension $d$ at large length scales to some smaller value at small, Planckian scales. While the origin of such a flow is well understood in continuum approaches, in theories built on discrete structures a firm control of the underlying mechanism is still missing. We shed some light on the issue by presenting a particular class of quantum geometries with a flow in the spectral dimension, given by superpositions of states defined on regular complexes. For particular superposition coefficients parametrized by a real number $0<\alpha<d$, we find that the spatial spectral dimension reduces to $d_s \simeq \alpha$ at small scales. The spatial Hausdorff dimension of such class of states varies between 1 and $d$, while the walk dimension takes the usual value $d_w=2$. Therefore, these quantum geometries may be considered as fractal only when $\alpha=1$, where the "magic number" ${d_s}^{\rm spacetime}\simeq 2$ for the spectral dimension of space\emph{time}, appearing so often in quantum gravity, is reproduced as well. These results apply, in particular, to special superpositions of spin-network states in loop quantum gravity, and they provide more solid indications of dimensional flow in this approach.
  • Group field theories represent a 2nd quantized reformulation of the loop quantum gravity state space and a completion of the spin foam formalism. States of the canonical theory, in the traditional continuum setting, have support on graphs of arbitrary valence. On the other hand, group field theories have usually been defined in a simplicial context, thus dealing with a restricted set of graphs. In this paper, we generalize the combinatorics of group field theories to cover all the loop quantum gravity state space. As an explicit example, we describe the GFT formulation of the KKL spin foam model, as well as a particular modified version. We show that the use of tensor model tools allows for the most effective construction. In order to clarify the mathematical basis of our construction and of the formalisms with which we deal, we also give an exhaustive description of the combinatorial structures entering spin foam models and group field theories, both at the level of the boundary states and of the quantum amplitudes.
  • The spectral dimension is an indicator of geometry and topology of spacetime and a tool to compare the description of quantum geometry in various approaches to quantum gravity. This is possible because it can be defined not only on smooth geometries but also on discrete (e.g., simplicial) ones. In this paper, we consider the spectral dimension of quantum states of spatial geometry defined on combinatorial complexes endowed with additional algebraic data: the kinematical quantum states of loop quantum gravity (LQG). Preliminarily, the effects of topology and discreteness of classical discrete geometries are studied in a systematic manner. We look for states reproducing the spectral dimension of a classical space in the appropriate regime. We also test the hypothesis that in LQG, as in other approaches, there is a scale dependence of the spectral dimension, which runs from the topological dimension at large scales to a smaller one at short distances. While our results do not give any strong support to this hypothesis, we can however pinpoint when the topological dimension is reproduced by LQG quantum states. Overall, by exploring the interplay of combinatorial, topological and geometrical effects, and by considering various kinds of quantum states such as coherent states and their superpositions, we find that the spectral dimension of discrete quantum geometries is more sensitive to the underlying combinatorial structures than to the details of the additional data associated with them.
  • We extend discrete calculus for arbitrary ($p$-form) fields on embedded lattices to abstract discrete geometries based on combinatorial complexes. We then provide a general definition of discrete Laplacian using both the primal cellular complex and its combinatorial dual. The precise implementation of geometric volume factors is not unique and, comparing the definition with a circumcentric and a barycentric dual, we argue that the latter is, in general, more appropriate because it induces a Laplacian with more desirable properties. We give the expression of the discrete Laplacian in several different sets of geometric variables, suitable for computations in different quantum gravity formalisms. Furthermore, we investigate the possibility of transforming from position to momentum space for scalar fields, thus setting the stage for the calculation of heat kernel and spectral dimension in discrete quantum geometries.
  • In fundamentally discrete approaches to quantum gravity such as loop quantum gravity, spin-foam models, group field theories or Regge calculus observables are functions on discrete geometries. We present a bra-ket formalism of function spaces and discrete calculus on abstract simplicial complexes equipped with geometry and apply it to the mentioned theories of quantum gravity. In particular we focus on the quantum geometric Laplacian and discuss as an example the expectation value of the heat kernel trace from which the spectral dimension follows.
  • We review the relation of N=4 superconformal multi-particle models on the real line to the WDVV equation and an associated linear equation for two prepotentials, F and U. The superspace treatment gives another variant of the integrability problem, which we also reformulate as a search for closed flat Yang-Mills connections. Three- and four-particle solutions are presented. The covector ansatz turns the WDVV equation into an algebraic condition, for which we give a formulation in terms of partial isometries. Three ideas for classifying WDVV solutions are developed: ortho-polytopes, hypergraphs, and matroids. Various examples and counterexamples are displayed.