• We report ALMA long-baseline observations of Orion Source I (SrcI) with resolution 0.03-0.06" (12-24 AU) at 1.3 and 3.2 mm. We detect both continuum and spectral line emission from SrcI's disk. We also detect a central weakly resolved source that we interpret as a hot spot in the inner disk, which may indicate the presence of a binary system. The high angular resolution and sensitivity of these observations allow us to measure the outer envelope of the rotation curve of the H$_2$O $5_{5,0}-6_{4,3}$ line, which gives a mass $M_I\approx15\pm2$ Msun. We detected several other lines that more closely trace the disk, but were unable to identify their parent species. Using centroid-of-channel methods on these other lines, we infer a similar mass. These measurements solidify SrcI as a genuine high-mass protostar system and support the theory that SrcI and the Becklin Neugebauer Object were ejected from the dynamical decay of a multiple star system $\sim$500 years ago, an event that also launched the explosive molecular outflow in Orion.
  • We measure H$_2$ temperatures and column densities across the Orion BN/KL explosive outflow from a set of thirteen near-IR H$_2$ rovibrational emission lines observed with the TripleSpec spectrograph on Apache Point Observatory's 3.5-meter telescope. We find that most of the region is well-characterized by a single temperature (~2000-2500 K), which may be influenced by the limited range of upper energy levels (6000-20,000 K) probed by our data set. The H$_2$ column density maps indicate that warm H$_2$ comprises 10$^{-5}$ - 10$^{-3}$ of the total H$_2$ column density near the center of the outflow. Combining column density measurements for co-spatial H$_2$ and CO at T = 2500 K, we measure a CO/H$_2$ fractional abundance of 2$\times$10$^{-3}$, and discuss possible reasons why this value is in excess of the canonical 10$^{-4}$ value, including dust attenuation, incorrect assumptions on co-spatiality of the H$_2$ and CO emission, and chemical processing in an extreme environment. We model the radiative transfer of H$_2$ in this region with UV pumping models to look for signatures of H$_2$ fluorescence from H I Ly$\alpha$ pumping. Dissociative (J-type) shocks and nebular emission from the foreground Orion H II region are considered as possible Ly$\alpha$ sources. From our radiative transfer models, we predict that signatures of Ly$\alpha$ pumping should be detectable in near-IR line ratios given a sufficiently strong source, but such a source is not present in the BN/KL outflow. The data are consistent with shocks as the H$_2$ heating source.
  • We report ALMA observations with resolution $\approx0.5$" at 3 mm of the extended Sgr B2 cloud in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ). We detect 271 compact sources, most of which are smaller than 5000 AU. By ruling out alternative possibilities, we conclude that these sources consist of a mix of hypercompact HII regions and young stellar objects (YSOs). Most of the newly-detected sources are YSOs with gas envelopes which, based on their luminosities, must contain objects with stellar masses $M_*\gtrsim8$ M$_\odot$. Their spatial distribution spread over a $\sim12\times3$ pc region demonstrates that Sgr B2 is experiencing an extended star formation event, not just an isolated `starburst' within the protocluster regions. Using this new sample, we examine star formation thresholds and surface density relations in Sgr B2. While all of the YSOs reside in regions of high column density ($N(H_2)\gtrsim2\times10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$), not all regions of high column density contain YSOs. The observed column density threshold for star formation is substantially higher than that in solar vicinity clouds, implying either that high-mass star formation requires a higher column density or that any star formation threshold in the CMZ must be higher than in nearby clouds. The relation between the surface density of gas and stars is incompatible with extrapolations from local clouds, and instead stellar densities in Sgr B2 follow a linear $\Sigma_*-\Sigma_{gas}$ relation, shallower than that observed in local clouds. Together, these points suggest that a higher volume density threshold is required to explain star formation in CMZ clouds.
  • We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations of $^{12}$CO2$-$1 emission from circumstellar material around the massive star $\eta$~Carinae. These observations reveal new structural details about the cool equatorial torus located $\sim$4000 au from the star. The CO torus is not a complete azimuthal loop, but rather, is missing its near side, which appears to have been cleared away. The missing material matches the direction of apastron in the eccentric binary system, making it likely that $\eta$~Car's companion played an important role in disrupting portions of the torus soon after ejection. Molecular gas seen in ALMA data aligns well with the cool dust around $\eta$~Car previously observed in mid-infrared (IR) maps, whereas hot dust resides at the inner surface of the molecular torus. The CO also coincides with the spatial and velocity structure of near-IR H$_2$ emission. Together, these suggest that the CO torus seen by ALMA is actually the pinched waist of the Homunculus polar lobes, which glows brightly because it is close to the star and warmer than the poles. The near side of the torus appears to be a blowout, associated with fragmented equatorial ejecta. We discuss implications for the origin of various features northwest of the star. CO emission from the main torus implies a total gas mass in the range of 0.2-1 $M_{\odot}$ (possibly up to 5 $M_{\odot}$ or more, although with questionable assumptions). Deeper observations are needed to constrain CO emission from the cool polar lobes.
  • Within the early Universe, `extreme' star formation may have been the norm rather than the exception. Super Star Clusters (SSCs; $M_\star$ $\gtrsim$ 10$^5$ M$_\odot$) are thought to be the modern-day analogs of globular clusters, relics of a cosmic time ($z$ $\gtrsim$ 2) when the Universe was filled with vigorously star-forming systems. The giant HII region 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is often regarded as a benchmark for studies of extreme star formation. Here, we report the discovery of a massive embedded star forming complex spanning $\sim$ 500 pc in the unexplored southwest region of the LMC, which manifests itself as a younger, embedded twin of 30 Doradus. Previously known as N79, this region has a star formation efficiency exceeding that of 30 Doradus by a factor of $\sim$ 2 as measured over the past $\lesssim$ 0.5 Myr. Moreover, at the heart of N79 lies the most luminous infrared (IR) compact source discovered with large-scale IR surveys of the LMC and Milky Way, possibly a precursor to the central SSC of 30 Doradus, R136. The discovery of a nearby candidate SSC may provide invaluable information to understand how extreme star formation proceeds in the current and high-redshift Universe.
  • We present proper motion measurements of 37 jets and HH objects in the Carina Nebula measured in two epochs of H$\alpha$ images obtained $\sim 10$ yrs apart with HST/ACS. Transverse velocities in all but one jet are faster than $\gtrsim 25$ km s$^{-1}$, confirming that the jet-like H$\alpha$ features identified by Smith et al. (2010) trace outflowing gas. Proper motions constrain the location of the jet-driving source and provide kinematic confirmation of the intermediate-mass protostars that we identify for 20/37 jets. Jet velocities do not correlate with the estimated protostar mass and embedded driving sources do not have slower jets. Instead, transverse velocities (median $\sim 75$ km s$^{-1}$) are similar to those in jets from low-mass stars. Assuming a constant velocity since launch, we compute jet dynamical ages (median $\sim 10^4$ yr). If continuous emission from inner jets traces the duration of the most recent accretion bursts, then these episodes are sustained longer (median $\sim 700$ yr) than the typical decay time of an FU Orionis outburst. These jets can carry appreciable momentum that may be injected into the surrounding environment. The resulting outflow force, $dP/dt$, lies between that measured in low- and high-mass sources, despite the very different observational tracers used. Smooth scaling of the outflow force argues for a common physical process underlying outflows from protostars of all masses. This latest kinematic result adds to a growing body of evidence that intermediate-mass star formation proceeds like a scaled-up version of the formation of low-mass stars.
  • High-mass stars have generally been assumed to accrete most of their mass while already contracted onto the main sequence, but this hypothesis has not been observationally tested. We present ALMA observations of a 3 x 1.5 pc area in the W51 high-mass star-forming complex. We identify dust continuum sources and measure the gas and dust temperature through both rotational diagram modeling of CH3OH and brightness-temperature-based limits. The observed region contains three high-mass YSOs that appear to be at the earliest stages of their formation, with no signs of ionizing radiation from their central sources. The data reveal high gas and dust temperatures (T > 100 K) extending out to about 5000 AU from each of these sources. There are no clear signs of disks or rotating structures down to our 1000 AU resolution. The extended warm gas provides evidence that, during the process of forming, these high-mass stars heat a large volume and correspondingly large mass of gas in their surroundings, inhibiting fragmentation and therefore keeping a large reservoir available to feed from. By contrast, the more mature massive stars that illuminate compact H ii regions have little effect on their surrounding dense gas, suggesting that these main sequence stars have completed most or all of their accretion. The high luminosity of the massive protostars (L > 10^4 solar luminosities), combined with a lack of centimeter continuum emission from these sources, implies that they are not on the main sequence while they accrete the majority of their mass; instead, they may be bloated and cool.
  • We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of molecular line emission from d216-0939, one of the largest and most massive protoplanetary disks in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). We model the spectrally resolved HCO$^+$ (4--3), CO (3--2), and HCN (4--3) lines observed at 0\farcs5 resolution to fit the temperature and density structure of the disk. We also weakly detect and spectrally resolve the CS (7--6) line but do not model it. The abundances we derive for CO and HCO$^+$ are generally consistent with expected values from chemical modeling of protoplanetary disks, while the HCN abundance is higher than expected. We dynamically measure the mass of the central star to be $2.17\pm0.07\,M_\odot$ which is inconsistent with the previously determined spectral type of K5. We also report the detection of a spatially unresolved high-velocity blue-shifted excess emission feature with a measurable positional offset from the central star, consistent with a Keplerian orbit at $60\pm20\,\mathrm{au}$. Using the integrated flux of the feature in HCO$^+$ (4--3), we estimate the total H$_2$ gas mass of this feature to be at least $1.8-8\,M_\mathrm{Jupiter}$, depending on the assumed temperature. The feature is due to a local temperature and/or density enhancement consistent with either a hydrodynamic vortex or the expected signature of the envelope of a forming protoplanet within the disk.
  • We constrain the proper motions of five OB stars associated with candidate stellar wind bow shocks in the Carina Nebula using HST ACS imaging over 9--10 year baselines. These proper motions allow us to directly compare each star's motion to the orientation of its candidate bow shock. Although these stars are saturated in our imaging, we assess their motion by the shifts required to minimize residuals in their Airy rings. The results limit the direction of each star's motion to sectors less than 90 degrees wide. None of the five stars are moving away from the Carina Nebula's central clusters as runaway stars would be, confirming that a candidate bow shock is not necessarily indicative of a runaway star. Two of the five stars are moving tangentially relative to the orientation of their candidate bow shocks, both of which point at the OB cluster Trumpler 14. In these cases, the large-scale flow of the interstellar medium, powered by feedback from the cluster, appears to dominate over the motion of the star in producing the observed candidate bow shock. The remaining three stars all have some component of motion toward the central clusters, meaning that we cannot distinguish whether their candidate bow shocks are indicators of stellar motion, of the flow of ambient gas, or of density gradients in their surroundings. In addition, these stars' lack of outward motion hints that the distributed massive-star population in Carina's South Pillars region formed in place, rather than migrating out from the association's central clusters.
  • We report the discovery in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of the new Herbig-Haro jet, HH 1019, located near the Tr 14 cluster in the Carina Nebula. Like other HH jets in the region, this bipolar collimated flow emerges from the head of a dark dust pillar. However, HH 1019 is unique because -- unlike all other HH jets known to date -- it is identified by a linear chain of dark, dusty knots that are seen primarily in silhouette against the background screen of the H II region. Proper motions confirm that these dark condensations move along the jet axis at high speed. [S II] emission traces a highly collimated jet that is spatially coincident with these dust knots. The high extinction in the body of the jet suggests that this outflow has lifted a large amount of dust directly from the disk, although it is possible that it has entrained dust from its surrounding protostellar envelope before exiting the dust pillar. If dust in HH 1019 originates from the circumstellar disk, this provides further evidence for a jet launched from a range of radii in the disk, including those outside the dust sublimation radius. HH 1019 may be the prototype for a new subclass of dusty HH objects seen primarily in extinction against the background screen of a bright H II region. Such jets may be common, but difficult to observe because they require the special condition of a very bright background in order to be seen in silhouette.
  • High-mass stars form within star clusters from dense, molecular regions, but is the process of cluster formation slow and hydrostatic or quick and dynamic? We link the physical properties of high-mass star-forming regions with their evolutionary stage in a systematic way, using Herschel and Spitzer data. In order to produce a robust estimate of the relative lifetimes of these regions, we compare the fraction of dense, molecular regions above a column density associated with high-mass star formation, N(H2) > 0.4-2.5 x 10^22 cm^-2, in the 'starless (no signature of stars > 10 Msun forming) and star-forming phases in a 2x2 degree region of the Galactic Plane centered at l=30deg. Of regions capable of forming high-mass stars on ~1 pc scales, the starless (or embedded beyond detection) phase occupies about 60-70% of the dense, molecular region lifetime and the star-forming phase occupies about 30-40%. These relative lifetimes are robust over a wide range of thresholds. We outline a method by which relative lifetimes can be anchored to absolute lifetimes from large-scale surveys of methanol masers and UCHII regions. A simplistic application of this method estimates the absolute lifetimes of the starless phase to be 0.2-1.7 Myr (about 0.6-4.1 fiducial cloud free-fall times) and the star-forming phase to be 0.1-0.7 Myr (about 0.4-2.4 free-fall times), but these are highly uncertain. This work uniquely investigates the star-forming nature of high-column density gas pixel-by-pixel and our results demonstrate that the majority of high-column density gas is in a starless or embedded phase.
  • Most massive stars form in dense clusters where gravitational interactions with other stars may be common. The two nearest forming massive stars, the BN object and Source I, located behind the Orion Nebula, were ejected with velocities of $\sim$29 and $\sim$13 km s$^{-1}$ about 500 years ago by such interactions. This event generated an explosion in the gas. New ALMA observations show in unprecedented detail, a roughly spherically symmetric distribution of over a hundred $^{12}$CO J=2$-$1 streamers with velocities extending from V$_{LSR}$ =$-$150 to +145 km s$^{-1}$. The streamer radial velocities increase (or decrease) linearly with projected distance from the explosion center, forming a `Hubble Flow' confined to within 50 arcseconds of the explosion center. They point toward the high proper-motion, shock-excited H$_2$ and [Fe ii ] `fingertips' and lower-velocity CO in the H$_2$ wakes comprising Orion's `fingers'. In some directions, the H$_2$ `fingers' extend more than a factor of two farther from the ejection center than the CO streamers. Such deviations from spherical symmetry may be caused by ejecta running into dense gas or the dynamics of the N-body interaction that ejected the stars and produced the explosion. This $\sim$10$^{48}$ erg event may have been powered by the release of gravitational potential energy associated with the formation of a compact binary or a protostellar merger. Orion may be the prototype for a new class of stellar explosion responsible for luminous infrared transients in nearby galaxies.
  • We present an ongoing, systematic search for extragalactic infrared transients, dubbed SPIRITS --- SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey. In the first year, using Spitzer/IRAC, we searched 190 nearby galaxies with cadence baselines of one month and six months. We discovered over 1958 variables and 43 transients. Here, we describe the survey design and highlight 14 unusual infrared transients with no optical counterparts to deep limits, which we refer to as SPRITEs (eSPecially Red Intermediate Luminosity Transient Events). SPRITEs are in the infrared luminosity gap between novae and supernovae, with [4.5] absolute magnitudes between -11 and -14 (Vega-mag) and [3.6]-[4.5] colors between 0.3 mag and 1.6 mag. The photometric evolution of SPRITEs is diverse, ranging from < 0.1 mag/yr to > 7 mag/yr. SPRITEs occur in star-forming galaxies. We present an in-depth study of one of them, SPIRITS 14ajc in Messier 83, which shows shock-excited molecular hydrogen emission. This shock may have been triggered by the dynamic decay of a non-hierarchical system of massive stars that led to either the formation of a binary or a proto-stellar merger.
  • The inner few hundred parsecs of the Milky Way, the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), is our closest laboratory for understanding star formation in the extreme environments (hot, dense, turbulent gas) that once dominated the universe. We present an update on the first large-area survey to expose the sites of star formation across the CMZ at high-resolution in submillimeter wavelengths: the CMZoom survey with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). We identify the locations of dense cores and search for signatures of embedded star formation. CMZoom is a three-year survey in its final year and is mapping out the highest column density regions of the CMZ in dust continuum and a variety of spectral lines around 1.3 mm. CMZoom combines SMA compact and subcompact configurations with single-dish data from BGPS and the APEX telescope, achieving an angular resolution of about 4" (0.2 pc) and good image fidelity up to large spatial scales.
  • The environment within the inner few hundred parsecs of the Milky Way, known as the "Central Molecular Zone" (CMZ), harbours densities and pressures orders of magnitude higher than the Galactic Disc; akin to that at the peak of cosmic star formation (Kruijssen & Longmore 2013). Previous studies have shown that current theoretical star-formation models under-predict the observed level of star-formation (SF) in the CMZ by an order of magnitude given the large reservoir of dense gas it contains. Here we explore potential reasons for this apparent dearth of star formation activity.
  • SPIRITS---SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey---is an ongoing survey of nearby galaxies searching for infrared (IR) transients with Spitzer/IRAC. We present the discovery and follow-up observations of one of our most luminous ($M_{[4.5]} = -17.1\pm0.4$ mag, Vega) and red ($[3.6] - [4.5] = 3.0 \pm 0.2$ mag) transients, SPIRITS 15c. The transient was detected in a dusty spiral arm of IC 2163 ($D\approx35.5$ Mpc). Pre-discovery ground-based imaging revealed an associated, shorter-duration transient in the optical and near-IR (NIR). NIR spectroscopy showed a broad ($\approx 8400$ km s$^{-1}$), double-peaked emission line of He I at $1.083 \mu$m, indicating an explosive origin. The NIR spectrum of SPIRITS 15c is similar to that of the Type IIb SN 2011dh at a phase of $\approx 200$ days. Assuming $A_V = 2.2$ mag of extinction in SPIRITS 15c provides a good match between their optical light curves. The IR light curves and the extreme $[3.6]-[4.5]$ color cannot be explained using only a standard extinction law. Another luminous ($M_{4.5} = -16.1\pm0.4$ mag) event, SPIRITS 14buu, was serendipitously discovered in the same galaxy. The source displays an optical plateau lasting $\gtrsim 80$ days, and we suggest a scenario similar to the low-luminosity Type IIP SN 2005cs obscured by $A_V \approx 1.5$ mag. Other classes of IR-luminous transients can likely be ruled out in both cases. If both events are indeed SNe, this may suggest $\gtrsim 18\%$ of nearby core-collapse SNe are missed by currently operating optical surveys.
  • We present new HST/WFC3-IR narrowband [Fe II] images of protostellar jets in the Carina Nebula. Combined with 5 previously published sources, we have a sample of 18 jets and 2 HH objects. All of the jets we targeted with WFC3 show bright infrared [Fe II] emission, and a few H$\alpha$ candidate jets are confirmed as collimated outflows based on the morphology of their [Fe II] emission. Continuum-subtracted images clearly separate jet emission from the adjacent ionization front, providing a better tracer of the collimated jet than H$\alpha$ and allowing us to connect these jets with their embedded driving sources. The [Fe II] 1.64 $\mu$m/H$\alpha$ flux ratio measured in the jets is $\gtrsim 5$ times larger than in the adjacent ionization fronts. The low-ionization jet core requires high densities to shield Fe$^+$ against further ionization by the FUV radiation from O-type stars in the H II region. High jet densities imply high mass-loss rates, consistent with the intermediate-mass driving sources we identify for 13 jets. The remaining jets emerge from opaque globules that obscure emission from the protostar. In many respects, the HH jets in Carina look like a scaled-up version of the jets driven by low-mass protostars. Altogether, these observations suggest that [Fe II] emission is a reliable tracer of dense, irradiated jets driven by intermediate-mass protostars. We argue that highly collimated outflows are common to more massive protostars, and that they suggest the outflow physics inferred for low-mass stars formation scales up to at least $\sim8$ M$_{\odot}$.
  • The Orion star-forming region is the nearest active high-mass star-forming region and has created a large superbubble, the Orion-Eridanus superbubble. Recent work by Ochsendorf et al. has extended the accepted boundary of the superbubble. We fit Kompaneets models of superbubbles expanding in exponential atmospheres to the new, larger shape of the Orion-Eridanus superbubble. We find that this larger morphology of the superbubble is consistent with the evolution of the superbubble being primarily controlled by expansion into the exponential Galactic disk ISM if the superbubble is oriented with the Eridanus side farther from the Sun than the Orion side. Unlike previous Kompaneets model fits that required abnormally small scale heights for the Galactic disk (<40 pc), we find morphologically consistent models with scale heights of 80 pc, similar to that expected for the Galactic disk.
  • We present new JVLA observations of the high-mass cluster-forming region W51A from 2 to 16 GHz with resolution ${\theta}_{fwhm} \approx$ 0.3 - 0.5". The data reveal a wealth of observational results: (1) Currently-forming, very massive (proto-O) stars are traced by o-H2CO $2_{1,1}-2_{1,2}$ emission, suggesting that this line can be used efficiently as a massive protostar tracer. (2) There is a spatially distributed population of $\sim$mJy continuum sources, including hypercompact H ii regions and candidate colliding wind binaries, in and around the W51 proto-clusters. (3) There are two clearly detected protoclusters, W51e and W51 IRS2, that are gas-rich but may have most of their mass in stars within their inner $\sim$ 0.05 pc. The majority of the bolometric luminosity in W51 most likely comes from a third population of OB stars between these clusters. The presence of a substantial population of exposed O-stars coincident with a population of still-forming massive stars, along with a direct measurement of the low mass loss rate via ionized gas outflow from W51 IRS2, together imply that feedback is ineffective at halting star formation in massive protoclusters. Instead, feedback may shut off the large-scale accretion of diffuse gas onto the W51 protoclusters, implying that they are evolving towards a state of gas exhaustion rather than gas expulsion. Recent theoretical models predict gas exhaustion to be a necessary step in the formation of gravitationally bound stellar clusters, and our results provide an observational validation of this process.
  • We present near-IR (1.1-2.4 micron) position-position-velocity cubes of the 500-year-old Orion BN/KL explosive outflow with spatial resolution 1" and spectral resolution 86 km/s. We construct integrated intensity maps free of continuum sources of 15 H2 and [Fe II] lines while preserving kinematic information of individual outflow features. Included in the detected H2 lines are the 1-0 S(1) and 1-0 Q(3) transitions, allowing extinction measurements across the outflow. Additionally, we present dereddened flux ratios for over two dozen outflow features to allow for the characterization of the true excitation conditions of the BN/KL outflow. All ratios show the dominance of shock excitation of the H2 emission, although some features exhibit signs of fluorescent excitation from stellar radiation or J-type shocks. We also detect tracers of the PDR/ionization front north of the Trapezium stars in [O I] and [Fe II] and analyze other observed outflows not associated with the BN/KL outflow.
  • The Galactic transient V1309 Sco was the result of a merger in a low-mass star system, while V838 Mon was thought to be a similar merger event from a more massive B-type progenitor. In this paper we study an optical/IR transient discovered in the nearby galaxy NGC4490, which appeared similar to these merger events (unobscured progenitor, irregular multi-peaked light curve, increasingly red color, similar optical spectrum, IR excess at late times), but which had a higher peak luminosity and longer duration in outburst. NGC4490-OT has less in common with the class of SN~2008S-like transients. A progenitor detected in pre-eruption HST images, combined with upper limits in the IR, requires a luminous and blue progenitor that has faded in late-time HST images. The same source was detected by Spitzer and ground-based data as a luminous IR transient, indicating a transition to a self-obscured state qualitatively similar to the evolution seen in other stellar mergers and in LBVs. The post-outburst dust-obscured source is too luminous and too warm at late times to be explained with an IR echo, suggesting that the object survived the event. The luminosity of the enshrouded IR source is similar to that of the progenitor. Compared to proposed merger events, the more massive progenitor of NGC4490-OT seems to extend a correlation between stellar mass and peak luminosity, and may suggest that both of these correlate with duration. We show that spectra of NGC4490-OT and V838 Mon also resemble light-echo spectra of eta Car, prompting us to speculate that eta Car may be an extreme extension of this phenomenon.
  • The formation environment of stars in massive stellar clusters is similar to the environment of stars forming in galaxies at a redshift of 1 - 3, at the peak star formation rate density of the Universe. As massive clusters are still forming at the present day at a fraction of the distance to high-redshift galaxies they offer an opportunity to understand the processes controlling star formation and feedback in conditions similar to those in which most stars in the Universe formed. Here we describe a system of massive clusters and their progenitor gas clouds in the centre of the Milky Way, and outline how detailed observations of this system may be able to: (i) help answer some of the fundamental open questions in star formation and (ii) quantify how stellar feedback couples to the surrounding interstellar medium in this high-pressure, high-redshift analogue environment.
  • We sort $4683$ molecular clouds between $10^\circ< \ell <65^\circ$ from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey based on observational diagnostics of star formation activity: compact $70$ $\mu{\rm m}$ sources, mid-IR color-selected YSOs, ${\rm H_2O}$ and ${\rm CH_3OH}$ masers, and UCHII regions. We also present a combined ${\rm NH_3}$-derived gas kinetic temperature and ${\rm H_2O}$ maser catalog for $1788$ clumps from our own GBT 100m observations and from the literature. We identify a subsample of $2223$ ($47.5\%$) starless clump candidates, the largest and most robust sample identified from a blind survey to date. Distributions of flux density, flux concentration, solid angle, kinetic temperature, column density, radius, and mass show strong ($>1$ dex) progressions when sorted by star formation indicator. The median starless clump candidate is marginally sub-virial ($\alpha \sim 0.7$) with $>75\%$ of clumps with known distance being gravitationally bound ($\alpha < 2$). These samples show a statistically significant increase in the median clump mass of $\Delta M \sim 170-370$ M$_\odot$ from the starless candidates to clumps associated with protostars. This trend could be due to (i) mass growth of the clumps at $\dot{M}\sim200-440$ Msun Myr$^{-1}$ for an average free-fall $0.8$ Myr time-scale, (ii) a systematic factor of two increase in dust opacity from starless to protostellar phases, (iii) and/or a variation in the ratio of starless to protostellar clump lifetime that scales as $\sim M^{-0.4}$. By comparing to the observed number of ${\rm CH_3OH}$ maser containing clumps we estimate the phase-lifetime of massive ($M>10^3$ M$_\odot$) starless clumps to be $0.37 \pm 0.08 \ {\rm Myr} \ (M/10^3 \ {\rm M}_\odot)^{-1}$; the majority ($M<450$ M$_\odot$) have phase-lifetimes longer than their average free-fall time.
  • The Galactic center is the closest region in which we can study star formation under extreme physical conditions like those in high-redshift galaxies. We measure the temperature of the dense gas in the central molecular zone (CMZ) and examine what drives it. We mapped the inner 300 pc of the CMZ in the temperature-sensitive J = 3-2 para-formaldehyde (p-H$_2$CO) transitions. We used the $3_{2,1} - 2_{2,0} / 3_{0,3} - 2_{0,2}$ line ratio to determine the gas temperature in $n \sim 10^4 - 10^5 $cm$^{-3}$ gas. We have produced temperature maps and cubes with 30" and 1 km/s resolution and published all data in FITS form. Dense gas temperatures in the Galactic center range from ~60 K to > 100 K in selected regions. The highest gas temperatures T_G > 100 K are observed around the Sgr B2 cores, in the extended Sgr B2 cloud, the 20 km/s and 50 km/s clouds, and in "The Brick" (G0.253+0.016). We infer an upper limit on the cosmic ray ionization rate ${\zeta}_{CR} < 10^{-14}$ 1/s. The dense molecular gas temperature of the region around our Galactic center is similar to values found in the central regions of other galaxies, in particular starburst systems. The gas temperature is uniformly higher than the dust temperature, confirming that dust is a coolant in the dense gas. Turbulent heating can readily explain the observed temperatures given the observed line widths. Cosmic rays cannot explain the observed variation in gas temperatures, so CMZ dense gas temperatures are not dominated by cosmic ray heating. The gas temperatures previously observed to be high in the inner ~75 pc are confirmed to be high in the entire CMZ.
  • We present ALMA observations of the largest protoplanetary disk in the Orion Nebula, 114-426. Detectable 345 GHz (856 micron) dust continuum is produced only in the 350 AU central region of the ~1000 AU diameter silhouette seen against the bright H-alpha background in HST images. Assuming optically thin dust emission at 345 GHz, a gas-to-dust ratio of 100, and a grain temperature of 20 K, the disk gas-mass is estimated to be 3.1 +/- 0.6 Jupiter masses. If most solids and ices have have been incorporated into large grains, however, this value is a lower limit. The disk is not detected in dense-gas tracers such as HCO+ J=4-3, HCN J=4-3, or CS =7-6. These results may indicate that the 114-426 disk is evolved and depleted in some light organic compounds found in molecular clouds. The CO J=3-2 line is seen in absorption against the bright 50 to 80 K background of the Orion A molecular cloud over the full spatial extent and a little beyond the dust continuum emission. The CO absorption reaches a depth of 27 K below the background CO emission at VLSR ~6.7 km/s about 0.52 arcseconds (210 AU) northeast and 12 K below the background CO emission at VLSR ~ 9.7 km/s about 0.34 arcseconds (140 AU) southwest of the suspected location of the central star, implying that the embedded star has a mass less than 1 Solar mass .