• To date, over 220 emission nebulae in M33 have been identified as supernova remnants (SNRs) or SNR candidates, principally through [SII]:Halpha line ratios that are elevated compared to those in H II regions. In many cases, the determination of a high [SII]:Halpha line ratio was made using narrow-band interference filter images and has not been confirmed spectroscopically. Here we present MMT 6.5 m optical spectra that we use to measure [SII]:Halpha and other line ratios in an attempt to determine the nature of these suggested candidates. Of the 197 objects in our sample, 120 have no previously published spectroscopic observations. We confirm that the majority of candidate SNRs have emission line ratios characteristic of SNRs. While no candidates show Doppler-broadened lines expected from young, ejecta-dominated SNRs (> 1000 km/s), a substantial number do exhibit lines that are broader than H II regions. We argue that the majority of the objects with high [SII]:Halpha line ratios (>0.4) are indeed SNRs, but at low surface brightness the distinction between H II regions and SNRs becomes less obvious, and additional criteria, such as X-ray detection, are needed. We discuss the properties of the sample as a whole and compare it with similar samples in other nearby galaxies.
  • We present H$\alpha$ spectroscopic observations and detailed modelling of the Balmer filaments in the supernova remnant Tycho. We used Galaxy H$\alpha$ Fabry-P\'erot Spectrometer on the William Herschel Telescope with a 3.4'$\times$3.4' field-of-view, 0.2" pixel scale and $\sigma_\rm{instr}=8.1$ km/s resolution at 1" seeing for $\sim10$ hours, resulting in 82 spatial-spectral bins that resolve the narrow H$\alpha$ line in the entire Tycho's northeastern rim. For the first time, we can mitigate artificial line broadening from unresolved differential motion, and probe H$\alpha$ emission parameters in varying shock and ambient medium conditions. Broad H$\alpha$ line remains unresolved within spectral coverage of 392 km/s. We employed Bayesian inference to obtain reliable parameter confidence intervals, and quantify the evidence for models with multiple line components. The median H$\alpha$ narrow-line full-width at half-maximum of all bins and models is $W_\rm{NL}=(54.8\pm1.8)$ km/s at the $95\%$ confidence level, varying within [35, 72] km/s between bins and clearly broadened compared to the intrinsic (thermal) $\approx20$ km/s. Possible line splits are accounted for, significant in $\approx18\%$ of the filament, and presumably due to remaining projection effects. We also find wide-spread evidence for intermediate-line emission of a broad-neutral precursor, with median $W_\rm{IL}=(180\pm14)$ km/s ($95\%$ confidence). Finally, we present a measurement of the remnant's systemic velocity, $V_\rm{LSR}=-34$ km/s, and map differential line-of-sight motions. Our results confirm the existence and interplay of shock precursors in Tycho's remnant. In particular, we show that suprathermal narrow-line emission is near-universal in Tycho and that, in absence of an alternative explanation, collisionless supernova remnant shocks constitute a viable acceleration source for Galactic TeV Cosmic-Ray protons.
  • We present wide-field, spatially and highly resolved spectroscopic observations of Balmer filaments in the northeastern rim of Tycho's supernova remnant in order to investigate the signal of cosmic-ray (CR) acceleration. The spectra of Balmer-dominated shocks (BDSs) have characteristic narrow (FWHM $\sim$ 10 kms$^{-1}$) and broad (FWHM $\sim$ 1000 kms$^{-1}$) H$\alpha$ components. CRs affect the H$\alpha$-line parameters: heating the cold neutrals in the interstellar medium results in broadening of the narrow H$\alpha$-line width beyond 20 kms$^{-1}$, but also in reduction of the broad H$\alpha$-line width due to energy being removed from the protons in the post-shock region. For the first time we show that the width of the narrow H$\alpha$ line, much larger than 20 kms$^{-1}$, is not a resolution or geometric effect nor a spurious result of a neglected intermediate (FWHM $\sim$ 100 kms$^{-1}$) component resulting from hydrogen atoms undergoing charge exchange with warm protons in the broad-neutral precursor. Moreover, we show that a narrow line width $\gg$ 20 kms$^{-1}$ extends across the entire NE rim, implying CR acceleration is ubiquitous, and making it possible to relate its strength to locally varying shock conditions. Finally, we find several locations along the rim, where spectra are significantly better explained (based on Bayesian evidence) by inclusion of the intermediate component, with a width of 180 kms$^{-1}$ on average.
  • The mixed morphology class of supernova remnants has centrally peaked X-ray emission along with a shell-like morphology in radio emission. White & Long proposed that these remnants are evolving in a cloudy medium wherein the clouds are evaporated via thermal conduction once being overrun by the expanding shock. Their analytical model made detailed predictions regarding temperature, density and emission profiles as well as shock evolution. We present numerical hydrodynamical models in 2D and 3D including thermal conduction, testing the White & Long model and presenting results for the evolution and emission from remnants evolving in a cloudy medium. We find that, while certain general results of the White & Long model hold, such as the way the remnants expand and the flattening of the X-ray surface brightness distribution, in detail there are substantial differences. In particular we find that the X-ray luminosity is dominated by emission from shocked cloud gas early on, leading to a bright peak which then declines and flattens as evaporation becomes more important. In addition, the effects of thermal conduction on the intercloud gas, which is not included in the White & Long model, are important and lead to further flattening of the X-ray brightness profile as well as lower X-ray emission temperatures.
  • We investigate the heating of an erupting prominence and loops associated with a coronal mass ejection and X-class flare. The prominence is seen in absorption in EUV at the beginning of its eruption. Later the prominence changes to emission, which indicates heating of the erupting plasma. We find the densities of the erupting prominence using the absorption properties of hydrogen and helium in different passbands. We estimate the temperatures and densities of the erupting prominence and loops seen as emission features using the differential emission measure method, which uses both EUV and X-ray observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board Solar Dynamics Observatory and the X-ray Telescope on board Hinode. We consider synthetic spectra using both photospheric and coronal abundances in these calculations. We verify the methods for the estimation of temperatures and densities for the erupting plasmas. Then we estimate the thermal, kinetic, radiative loss, thermal conduction, and heating energies of the erupting prominence and loops. We find that the heating of the erupting prominence and loop occurs strongly at early times in the eruption. This event shows a writhing motion of the erupting prominence, which may indicate a hot flux rope heated by thermal energy release during magnetic reconnection.
  • Magnetic reconnection plays an integral part in nearly all models of solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The reconnection heats and accelerates the plasma, produces energetic electrons and ions, and changes the magnetic topology to form magnetic flux ropes and allow CMEs to escape. Structures that appear between flare loops and CME cores in optical, UV, EUV and X-ray observations have been identified as current sheets and interpreted in terms of the nature of the reconnection process and the energetics of the events. Many of these studies have used UV spectral observations of high temperature emission features in the [Fe XVIII] and Si XII lines. In this paper we discuss several surprising cases in which the [Fe XVIII] and Si XII emission peaks are spatially offset from each other. We discuss interpretations based on asymmetric reconnection, on a thin reconnection region within a broader streamer-like structure, and on projection effects. Some events seem to be easily interpreted as projection of a sheet that is extended along the line of sight that is viewed an angle, but a physical interpretation in terms of asymmetric reconnection is also plausible. Other events favor an interpretation as a thin current sheet embedded in a streamer-like structure.
  • While theoretical dust condensation models predict that most refractory elements produced in core-collapse supernovae (SNe) efficiently condense into dust, a large quantity of dust has so far only been observed in SN 1987A. We present the analysis of Spitzer Space Telescope, Herschel Space Observatory, Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), and AKARI observations of the infrared (IR) shell surrounding the pulsar wind nebula in the supernova remnant G54.1+0.3. We attribute a distinctive spectral feature at 21 $\mu$m to a magnesium silicate grain species that has been invoked in modeling the ejecta-condensed dust in Cas A, which exhibits the same spectral signature. If this species is responsible for producing the observed spectral feature and accounts for a significant fraction of the observed IR continuum, we find that it would be the dominant constituent of the dust in G54.1+0.3, with possible secondary contributions from other compositions, such as carbon, silicate, or alumina grains. The smallest mass of SN-formed dust required by our models is 1.1 $\pm$ 0.8 $\rm M_{\odot}$. We discuss how these results may be affected by varying dust grain properties and self-consistent grain heating models. The spatial distribution of the dust mass and temperature in G54.1+0.3 confirms the scenario in which the SN-formed dust has not yet been processed by the SN reverse shock and is being heated by stars belonging to a cluster in which the SN progenitor exploded. The dust mass and composition suggest a progenitor mass of 16$-$27 $\rm M_{\odot}$ and imply a high dust condensation efficiency, similar to that found for Cas A and SN 1987A. The study provides another example of significant dust formation in a Type IIP SN and sheds light on the properties of pristine SN-condensed dust.
  • We present Fabry-P\'erot interferometric observations of the narrow H$\alpha$ component in the shock front of the historical supernova remnant Tycho (SN 1572). Using GH$\alpha$FaS (Galaxy H$\alpha$ Fabry-P\'erot Spectrometer) on the William Herschel Telescope, we observed a great portion of the shock front in the northeastern (NE) region of the remnant. The angular resolution of $\sim$1$^{\prime\prime}$ and spectral resolving power of R$\sim$21 000 together with the large field-of-view (3.4$^{\prime}$ $\times$ 3.4$^{\prime}$) of the instrument allow us to measure the narrow H$\alpha$-line width in 73 bins across individual parts of the shock simultaneously and thereby study the indicators of several shock precursors in a large variety of shock front conditions. Compared to previous studies, the detailed spatial resolution of the filament also allows us to mitigate possible artificial broadening of the line from unresolved differential motion and projection. Covering one quarter of the remnant's shell, we confirm the broadening of the narrow H$\alpha$ line beyond its intrinsic width of $\sim$20 km/s and report it to extend over most of the filament, not only the previously investigated dense 'knot g'. Similarly, we confirm and find additional strong evidence for wide-spread intermediate-line ($\sim$150 km/s) emission. Our Bayesian analysis approach allows us to quantify the evidence for this intermediate component as well as a possible split in the narrow line. Suprathermal narrow line widths point toward an additional heating mechanism in the form of a cosmic-ray precursor, while the intermediate component, previously only qualitatively reported as a small non-Gaussian contribution to the narrow component, reveals a broad-neutral precursor.
  • [Fe II] emission lines are prominent in the infrared (IR), and they are important diagnostic tools for radiative atomic shocks. We investigate the emission characteristics of [Fe II] lines using a shock code developed by Raymond (1979) with updated atomic parameters. We first review general characteristics of IR [Fe II] emission lines from shocked gas, and derive [Fe II] line fluxes as a function of shock speed and ambient density. We have compiled the available IR [Fe II] line observations of interstellar shocks and compare them to the ratios predicted from our model. The sample includes both young and old supernova remnants in the Galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud and several Herbig-Haro objects. We find that the observed ratios of IR [Fe II] lines generally fall on our grid of shock models, but the ratios of some mid-infrared lines, e.g., [Fe II] 35.35 um/[Fe II] 25.99 um, [Fe II] 5.340 um/[Fe II] 25.99 um, and [Fe II] 5.340 um/[Fe II] 17.94 um, are significantly offset from our model grid. We discuss possible explanations and conclude that the uncertainty in atomic rates might be the major source of uncertainty, while uncertainties in the shock modeling and the observations certainly exist.
  • We present high-resolution long-slit spectroscopy of a Balmer-dominated shock in the northeastern limb of the Cygnus Loop with the Subaru high dispersion spectrograph. By setting the slit angle along the shock normal, we investigate variations of the flux and profile of the H-alpha line from preshock to postshock regions with a spatial resolution of about 4 times 10^{15} cm. The H-alpha line profile can be represented by a narrow (28.9+/-0.7 km/s) Gaussian in a diffuse region ahead of the shock, i.e., a photoionization precursor, and narrow (33.1+/-0.2 km/s) plus broad (130-230 km/s) Gaussians at the shock itself. We find that the width of the narrow component abruptly increases up to 33.1+/-0.2 km/s, or 38.8+/-0.4 km/s if we eliminate projected emission originating from the photoionization precursor, in an unresolved thin layer (< 4 times 10^{15} cm at a distance of 540 pc) at the shock. We show that the sudden broadening can be best explained by heating via damping of Alfven waves in a thin cosmic-ray precursor, although other possibilities are not fully ruled out. The thickness of the cosmic-ray precursor in the Cygnus Loop (a soft gamma-ray emitter) is an order of magnitude thinner than that in Tycho's Knot g (a hard gamma-ray emitter), which may be caused by different energy distribution of accelerated particles between the two sources. In this context, systematic studies might reveal a positive correlation between the thickness of the cosmic-ray precursor and the hardness of the cosmic-ray energy distribution.
  • We report on the proper motions of Balmer-dominated filaments in Kepler's supernova remnant using high resolution images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope at two epochs separated by about 10 years. We use the improved proper motion measurements and revised values of shock velocities to derive a distance to Kepler of 5.1 [+0.8, -0.7] kpc. The main shock around the northern rim of the remnant has a typical speed of 1690 km/s and is encountering material with densities of about 8 cm^-3. We find evidence for the variation of shock properties over small spatial scales, including differences in the driving pressures as the shock wraps around a curved cloud surface. We find that the Balmer filaments ahead of the ejecta knot on the northwest boundary of the remnant are becoming fainter and more diffuse. We also find that the Balmer filaments associated with circumstellar material in the interior regions of the remnant are due to shocks with significantly lower velocities and that the brightness variations among these filaments trace the density distribution of the material, which may have a disk-like geometry.
  • Recent observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi satellite have revealed bright gamma-ray emission from middle-aged supernova remnants (SNRs) inside our Galaxy. These remnants, which also possess bright non-thermal radio shells, are often found to be interacting directly with surrounding gas clouds. We explore the non-thermal emission mechanism at these dynamically evolved SNRs by constructing a hydrodynamical model. Two scenarios of particle acceleration, either a re-acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) or an efficient nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (NLDSA) of particles injected from downstream, are considered. Using parameters inferred from observations, our models are contrasted with the observed spectra of SNR W44. For the re-acceleration case, we predict a significant enhancement of radio and GeV emission as the SNR undergoes a transition into the radiative phase. If sufficiently strong magnetic turbulence is present in the molecular cloud, the re-acceleration scenario can explain the observed broadband spectral properties. The NLDSA scenario also succeeds in explaining the $\gamma$-ray spectrum but fails to reproduce the radio spectral index. Efficient NLDSA also results in a significant post-shock non-thermal pressure that limits the compression during cooling and prevents the formation of a prominent dense shell. Some other interesting differences between the two models in hydrodynamical behavior and resulting spectral features are illustrated.
  • Supernova remnants are among the most spectacular examples of astrophysical pistons in our cosmic neighborhood. The gas expelled by the supernova explosion is launched with velocities ~ 1000 km/s into the ambient, tenuous interstellar medium, producing shocks that excite hydrogen lines. We have used an optical integral-field spectrograph to obtain high-resolution spatial-spectral maps that allow us to study in detail the shocks in the northwestern rim of supernova 1006. The two-component H\alpha\ line is detected at 133 sky locations. Variations in the broad line widths and the broad-to-narrow line intensity ratios across tens of atomic mean free paths suggest the presence of suprathermal protons, the potential seed particles for generating high-energy cosmic-rays.
  • Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are thought to drive collisionless shocks in the solar corona, which in turn have been shown capable of accelerating solar energetic particles (SEPs) in minutes. It has been notoriously difficult to extract information about energetic particle spectra in the corona, due to lack of in-situ measurements. It is possible, however, to combine remote observations with data-driven models in order to deduce coronal shock properties relevant to the local acceleration of SEPs and their heliospheric connectivity to near-Earth space. We present such novel analysis applied to the May 11, 2011 CME event on the western solar limb, focusing on the evolution of the eruption-driven, dome-like shock wave observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) EUV telescopes on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft. We analyze the shock evolution and estimate its strength using emission measure modeling. We apply a new method combining a geometric model of the shock front with a potential field source surface model to estimate time-dependent field-to-shock angles and heliospheric connectivity during shock passage in the low corona. We find that the shock was weak, with an initial speed of ~450 km/s. It was initially mostly quasi-parallel, but significant portion of it turned quasi-perpendicular later in the event. There was good magnetic connectivity to near-Earth space towards the end of the event as observed by the AIA instrument. The methods used in this analysis hold a significant potential for early characterization of coronal shock waves and forecasting of SEP spectra based on remote observations.
  • Magnetic reconnection is believed to be the dominant energy release mechanism in solar flares. The standard flare model predicts both downward and upward outflow plasmas with speeds close to the coronal Alfv\'{e}n speed. Yet, spectroscopic observations of such outflows, especially the downflows, are extremely rare. With observations of the newly launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we report the detection of greatly redshifted ($\sim$125 km s$^{-1}$ along line of sight) Fe {\sc{xxi}} 1354.08\AA{} emission line with a $\sim$100 km s$^{-1}$ nonthermal width at the reconnection site of a flare. The redshifted Fe {\sc{xxi}} feature coincides spatially with the loop-top X-Ray source observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). We interpret this large redshift as the signature of downward-moving reconnection outflow/hot retracting loops. Imaging observations from both IRIS and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) also reveal the eruption and reconnection processes. Fast downward-propagating blobs along these loops are also found from cool emission lines (e.g., Si {\sc{iv}}, O {\sc{iv}}, C {\sc{ii}}, Mg {\sc{ii}}) and images of AIA and IRIS. Furthermore, the entire Fe {\sc{xxi}} line is blueshifted by $\sim$260 km s$^{-1}$ at the loop footpoints, where the cool lines mentioned above all exhibit obvious redshift, a result that is consistent with the scenario of chromospheric evaporation induced by downward-propagating nonthermal electrons from the reconnection site.
  • We investigate seven eruptive plasma observations by Hinode/XRT. Their corresponding EUV and/or white light CME features are visible in some events. Five events are observed in several passbands in X-rays, which allows the determination of the eruptive plasma temperature using a filter ratio method. We find that the isothermal temperatures vary from 1.6 to 10 MK. These temperatures are an average weighted toward higher temperature plasma. We determine the mass constraints of eruptive plasmas by assuming simplified geometrical structures of the plasma with isothermal plasma temperatures. This method provides an upper limit to the masses of the observed eruptive plasmas in X-ray passbands since any clumping causes the overestimation of the mass. For the other two events, we assume the temperatures are at the maximum temperature of the XRT temperature response function, which gives a lower limit of the masses. We find that the masses in XRT, ~3x10 13 - 5x10 14 g, are smaller in their upper limit than total masses obtained by LASCO, ~1x10 15 g. In addition, we estimate the radiative loss, thermal conduction, thermal, and kinetic energies of the eruptive plasma in X-rays. For four events, we find that the thermal conduction time scales are much shorter than the duration of eruption. This result implies that additional heating during the eruption may be required to explain the plasma observations in X-rays for the four events.
  • Comet C/2002 S2, a member of the Kreutz family of Sungrazing comets, was discovered in white light images of the SOHO/LASCO coronagraph on 2002 September 18 and observed in \hi\, \lya\, emission by the SOHO/UVCS instrument at four different heights as it approached the Sun. The \hi\, \lya\, line profiles detected by UVCS are analyzed to determine the spectral parameters: line intensity, width and Doppler shift with respect to the coronal background. Two dimensional comet images of these parameters are reconstructed at the different heights. A novel aspect of the observations of this sungrazing comet data is that, whereas the emission from the most of the tail is blue--shifted, that along one edge of the tail is red--shifted. We attribute these shifts to a combination of solar wind speed and interaction with the magnetic field. In order to use the comet to probe the density, temperature and speed of the corona and solar wind through which it passes, as well as to determine the outgassing rate of the comet, we develop a Monte Carlo simulation of the \hi\, \lya\, emission of a comet moving through a coronal plasma. From the outgassing rate, we estimate a nucleus diameter of about 9 meters. This rate steadily increases as the comet approaches the Sun while the optical brightness decreases by more than a factor of ten and suddenly recovers. This indicates that the optical brightness is determined by the lifetimes of the grains, sodium atoms and molecules produced by the comet.
  • We report results from Spitzer observations of SNR 0509-68.7, also known as N103B, a young Type Ia supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud that shows interaction with a dense medium in its western hemisphere. Our images show that N103B has strong IR emission from warm dust in the post-shock environment. The post-shock gas density we derive, 45 cm$^{-3}$, is much higher than in other Type Ia remnants in the LMC, though a lack of spatial resolution may bias measurements towards regions of higher than average density. This density is similar to that in Kepler's SNR, a Type Ia interacting with a circumstellar medium. Optical images show H$\alpha$ emission along the entire periphery of the western portion of the shock, with [O III] and [S II] lines emitted from a few dense clumps of material where the shock has become radiative. The dust is silicate in nature, though standard silicate dust models fail to reproduce the "18 $\mu$m" silicate feature that peaks instead at 17.3 $\mu$m. We propose that the dense material is circumstellar material lost from the progenitor system, as with Kepler. If the CSM interpretation is correct, this remnant would become the second member, along with Kepler, of a class of Type Ia remnants characterized by interaction with a dense CSM hundreds of years post-explosion. A lack of N enhancement eliminates symbiotic AGB progenitors. The white dwarf companion must have been relatively unevolved at the time of the explosion.
  • Phosphorus ($^{31}$P), which is essential for life, is thought to be synthesized in massive stars and dispersed into interstellar space when these stars explode as supernovae (SNe). Here we report on near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the young SN remnant Cassiopeia A, which show that the abundance ratio of phosphorus to the major nucleosynthetic product iron ($^{56}$Fe) in SN material is up to 100 times the average ratio of the Milky Way, confirming that phosphorus is produced in SNe. The observed range is compatible with predictions from SN nucleosynthetic models but not with the scenario in which the chemical elements in the inner SN layers are completely mixed by hydrodynamic instabilities during the explosion.
  • Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants, gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV $\lambda$1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 micron and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the CIV intensity 10" behind the shock is too high compared to the intensities at the shock and 25" behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre-shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.
  • We present an analysis of EUV and soft X-ray emission detected toward Comet Lovejoy (C/2011 W3) during its post-perihelion traverse of the solar corona on December 16, 2011. Observations were recorded by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) aboard Hinode. A single set of contemporaneous images is explored in detail, along with prefatory consideration for time evolution using only the 171 A data. For each of the eight passbands, we characterize the emission and derive outgassing rates where applicable. As material sublimates from the nucleus and is immersed in coronal plasma, it rapidly ionizes through charge states seldom seen in this environment. The AIA data show four stages of oxygen ionization (O III - O VI) along with C IV, while XRT likely captured emission from O VII, a line typical of the corona. With a nucleus of at least several hundred meters upon approach to a perihelion that brought the comet to within 0.2 solar radii of the photosphere, Lovejoy was the most significant sungrazer in recent history. Correspondingly high outgassing rates on the order of 10^32.5 oxygen atoms per second are estimated. Assuming that the neutral oxygen comes from water, this translates to a mass-loss rate of about 9.5E9 g/s, and based only on the 171 A observations, we find a total mass loss of approximately 10^13 g over the AIA egress. Additional and supporting analyses include a differential emission measure to characterize the coronal environment, consideration for the opening angle, and a comparison of the emission's leading edge with the expected position of the nucleus.
  • Most of our knowledge of the physical processes in distant plasmas is obtained through measurement of the radiation they produce. Here we provide an overview of the main collisional and radiative processes and examples of diagnostics relevant to the microphysical processes in the plasma. Many analyses assume a time-steady plasma with ion populations in equilibrium with the local temperature and Maxwellian distributions of particle velocities, but these assumptions are easily violated in many cases. We consider these departures from equilibrium and possible diagnostics in detail.
  • We report results of infrared imaging and spectroscopic observations of the SN 1006 remnant, carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 24 micron image from MIPS clearly shows faint filamentary emission along the northwest rim of the remnant shell, nearly coincident with the Balmer filaments that delineate the present position of the expanding shock. The 24 micron emission traces the Balmer filaments almost perfectly, but lies a few arcsec within, indicating an origin in interstellar dust heated by the shock. Subsequent decline in the IR behind the shock is presumably due largely to grain destruction through sputtering. The emission drops far more rapidly than current models predict, however, even for a higher proportion of small grains than would be found closer to the Galactic plane. The rapid drop may result in part from a grain density that has always been lower -- a relic effect from an earlier epoch when the shock was encountering a lower density -- but higher grain destruction rates still seem to be required. Spectra from three positions along the NW filament from the IRS instrument all show only a featureless continuum, consistent with thermal emission from warm dust. The dust-to-gas mass ratio in the pre-shock interstellar medium is lower than that expected for the Galactic ISM -- as has also been observed in the analysis of IR emission from other SNRs but whose cause remains unclear. As with other SN Ia remnants, SN 1006 shows no evidence for dust grain formation in the supernova ejecta.
  • The Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) often observes low ionization state coronal mass ejection (CME) plasma at ultraviolet wavelengths. The CME plasmas are often detected in O VI (3x10^5K), C III (8x10^4K), LyA, and LyB, with the low ionization plasma confined to bright filaments or blobs that appear in small segments of the UVCS slit. On the other hand, in situ observations by the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) on board Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) have shown mostly high ionization state plasmas in the magnetic clouds in interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICME) events, while low ionization states are rarely seen. In this analysis, we investigate whether the low ionization state CME plasmas observed by UVCS occupy small enough fractions of the CME to be consistent with the small fraction of ACE ICMEs that show low ionization plasma, or whether the CME plasma must be further ionized after passing the UVCS slit. To do this, we determine the covering factors of low ionization state plasma for 10 CME events. We find that the low ionization state plasmas in CMEs observed by UVCS show average covering factors below 10%. This indicates that the lack of low ionization state ICME plasmas observed by the ACE results from a small probability that the spacecraft passes through a region of low ionization plasma. We also find that the low ionization state plasma covering factors in faster CMEs are smaller than in slower CMEs.
  • We report results from a multi-wavelength analysis of the Galactic SNR RCW 86, the proposed remnant of the supernova of 185 A.D. We report new infrared observations from {\it Spitzer} and {\it WISE}, where the entire shell is detected at 24 and 22 $\mu$m. We fit the infrared flux ratios with models of collisionally heated ambient dust, finding post-shock gas densities in the non-radiative shocks of 2.4 and 2.0 cm$^{-3}$ in the SW and NW portions of the remnant, respectively. The Balmer-dominated shocks around the periphery of the shell, large amount of iron in the X-ray emitting ejecta, and lack of a compact remnant support a Type Ia origin for this remnant. From hydrodynamic simulations, the observed characteristics of RCW 86 are successfully reproduced by an off-center explosion in a low-density cavity carved by the progenitor system. This would make RCW 86 the first known case of a Type Ia supernova in a wind-blown bubble. The fast shocks ($> 3000$ km s$^{-1}$) observed in the NE are propagating in the low-density bubble, where the shock is just beginning to encounter the shell, while the slower shocks elsewhere have already encountered the bubble wall. The diffuse nature of the synchrotron emission in the SW and NW is due to electrons that were accelerated early in the lifetime of the remnant, when the shock was still in the bubble. Electrons in a bubble could produce gamma-rays by inverse-Compton scattering. The wind-blown bubble scenario requires a single-degenerate progenitor, which should leave behind a companion star.