• Cherenkov radiation provides a valuable way to identify high energy particles in a wide momentum range, through the relation between the particle velocity and the Cherenkov angle. However, since the Cherenkov angle depends only on material's permittivity, the material unavoidably sets a fundamental limit to the momentum coverage and sensitivity of Cherenkov detectors. For example, Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors must employ materials transparent to the frequency of interest as well as possessing permittivities close to unity to identify particles in the multi GeV range, and thus are often limited to large gas chambers. It would be extremely important albeit challenging to lift this fundamental limit and control Cherenkov angles as preferred. Here we propose a new mechanism that uses constructive interference of resonance transition radiation from photonic crystals to generate both forward and backward Cherenkov radiation. This mechanism can control Cherenkov angles in a flexible way with high sensitivity to any desired range of velocities. Photonic crystals thus overcome the severe material limit for Cherenkov detectors, enabling the use of transparent materials with arbitrary values of permittivity, and provide a promising option suited for identification of particles at high energy with enhanced sensitivity.
  • Efficient numeric algorithm is the key for accurate evaluation of density of states (DOS) in band theory. Gilat-Raubenheimer (GR) method proposed in 1966 is an efficient linear extrapolation method which was limited in specific lattices. Here, using an affine transformation, we provide a new generalization of the original GR method to any Bravais lattices and show that it is superior to the tetrahedron method and the adaptive Gaussian broadening method. Finally, we apply our generalized GR (GGR) method to compute DOS of various gyroid photonic crystals of topological degeneracies.
  • The ideas of topology have found tremendous success in Hermitian physical systems, but even richer properties exist in the more general non-Hermitian framework. Here, we theoretically propose and experimentally demonstrate a new topologically-protected bulk Fermi arc which---unlike the well-known surface Fermi arcs arising from Weyl points in Hermitian systems---develops from non-Hermitian radiative losses in photonic crystal slabs. Moreover, we discover half-integer topological charges in the polarization of far-field radiation around the Fermi arc. We show that both phenomena are direct consequences of the non-Hermitian topological properties of exceptional points, where resonances coincide in their frequencies and linewidths. Our work connects the fields of topological photonics, non-Hermitian physics and singular optics, and paves the way for future exploration of non-Hermitian topological systems.
  • 2D materials provide a platform for strong light--matter interactions, creating wide-ranging design opportunities via new-material discoveries and new methods for geometrical structuring. We derive general upper bounds to the strength of such light--matter interactions, given only the optical conductivity of the material, including spatial nonlocality, and otherwise independent of shape and configuration. Our material figure of merit shows that highly doped graphene is an optimal material at infrared frequencies, whereas single-atomic-layer silver is optimal in the visible. For quantities ranging from absorption and scattering to near-field spontaneous-emission enhancements and radiative heat transfer, we consider canonical geometrical structures and show that in certain cases the bounds can be approached, while in others there may be significant opportunity for design improvement. The bounds can encourage systematic improvements in the design of ultrathin broadband absorbers, 2D antennas, and near-field energy harvesters.
  • A fundamental building block for nanophotonics is the ability to achieve negative refraction of polaritons, because this could enable the demonstration of many unique nanoscale applications such as deep-subwavelength imaging, superlens, and novel guiding. However, to achieve negative refraction of highly squeezed polaritons, such as plasmon polaritons in graphene and phonon polaritons in boron nitride (BN) with their wavelengths squeezed by a factor over 100, requires the ability to flip the sign of their group velocity at will, which is challenging. Here we reveal that the strong coupling between plasmon and phonon polaritons in graphene-BN heterostructures can be used to flip the sign of the group velocity of the resulting hybrid (plasmon-phonon-polariton) modes. We predict all-angle negative refraction between plasmon and phonon polaritons, and even more surprisingly, between hybrid graphene plasmons, and between hybrid phonon polaritons. Graphene-BN heterostructures thus provide a versatile platform for the design of nano-metasurfaces and nano-imaging elements.
  • Material losses in metals are a central bottleneck in plasmonics for many applications. Here we propose and theoretically demonstrate that metal losses can be successfully mitigated with dielectric particles on metallic films, giving rise to hybrid dielectric--metal resonances. In the far field, they yield strong and efficient scattering, beyond even the theoretical limits of all-metal and all-dielectric structures. In the near field, they offer high-Purcell-factor (${>}5000$), high-quantum-efficiency (${>}90\%$), and highly directional emission at visible and infrared wavelengths. Their quality factors can be readily tailored from plasmonic-like (${\sim}10$) to dielectric-like (${\sim}10^3$), with wide control over the individual resonant coupling to photon, plasmon, and dissipative channels. Compared with conventional plasmonic nanostructures, such resonances show robustness against detrimental nonlocal effects and provide higher field enhancement at extreme nanoscopic sizes and spacings. These hybrid resonances equip plasmonics with high efficiency, which has been the predominant goal since the field's inception.
  • Classical wave fields are real-valued, ensuring the wave states at opposite frequencies and momenta to be inherently identical. Such a particle-hole symmetry can open up new possibilities for topological phenomena in classical systems. Here we show that the historically studied two-dimensional (2D) magnetoplasmon, which bears gapped bulk states and gapless one-way edge states near zero frequency, is topologically analogous to the 2D topological $p+\Ii p$ superconductor with chiral Majorana edge states and zero modes. We further predict a new type of one-way edge magnetoplasmon at the interface of opposite magnetic domains, and demonstrate the existence of zero-frequency modes bounded at the peripheries of a hollow disk. These findings can be readily verified in experiment, and can greatly enrich the topological phases in bosonic and classical systems.
  • Linear acceleration in free space is a topic that has been studied for over 20 years, and its ability to eventually produce high-quality, high energy multi-particle bunches has remained a subject of great interest. Arguments can certainly be made that such an ability is very doubtful. Nevertheless, we chose to develop an accurate and truly predictive theoretical formalism to explore this remote possibility in a computational experiment. The formalism includes exact treatment of Maxwell's equations, exact relativistic treatment of the interaction among the multiple individual particles, and exact treatment of the interaction at near and far field. Several surprising results emerged. For example, we find that 30 keV electrons (2.5% energy spread) can be accelerated to 7.7 MeV (2.5% spread) and to 205 MeV (0.25% spread) using 25 mJ and 2.5 J lasers respectively. These findings should hopefully guide and help develop compact, high-quality, ultra-relativistic electron sources, avoiding conventional limits imposed by material breakdown or structural constraints.
  • Highly directional radiation from photonic structures is important for many applications, including high power photonic crystal surface emitting lasers, grating couplers, and light detection and ranging devices. However, previous dielectric, few-layer designs only achieved moderate asymmetry ratios, and a fundamental understanding of bounds on asymmetric radiation from arbitrary structures is still lacking. Here, we show that breaking the 180$^\circ$ rotational symmetry of the structure is crucial for achieving highly asymmetric radiation. We develop a general temporal coupled-mode theory formalism to derive bounds on the asymmetric decay rates to the top and bottom of a photonic crystal slab for a resonance with arbitrary in-plane wavevector. Guided by this formalism, we show that infinite asymmetry is still achievable even without the need of back-reflection mirrors, and we provide numerical examples of designs that achieve asymmetry ratios exceeding $10^4$. The emission direction can also be rapidly switched from top to bottom by tuning the wavevector or frequency. Furthermore, we show that with the addition of weak material absorption loss, such structures can be used to achieve perfect absorption with single-sided illumination, even for single-pass absorption rates less than $0.5\%$ and without back-reflection mirrors. Our work provides new design principles for achieving highly directional radiation and perfect absorption in photonics.
  • Subwavelength resonators, ranging from single atoms to metallic nanoparticles, typically exhibit a narrow-bandwidth response to optical excitations. We computationally design and experimentally synthesize tailored distributions of silver nanodisks to extinguish light over broad and varied frequency windows. We show that metallic nanodisks are two-to-ten-times more efficient in absorbing and scattering light than common structures, and can approach fundamental limits to broadband scattering for subwavelength particles. We measure broadband extinction per volume that closely approaches theoretical predictions over three representative visible-range wavelength windows, confirming the high efficiency of nanodisks and demonstrating the collective power of computational design and experimental precision for developing new photonics technologies.
  • The iso-frequency contours of a photonic crystal are important for predicting and understanding exotic optical phenomena that are not apparent from high-symmetry band structure visualizations. Here, we demonstrate a method to directly visualize the iso-frequency contours of high-quality photonic crystal slabs that shows quantitatively good agreement with numerical results throughout the visible spectrum. Our technique relies on resonance-enhanced photon scattering from generic fabrication disorder and surface roughness, so it can be applied to general photonic and plasmonic crystals, or even quasi-crystals. We also present an analytical model of the scattering process, which explains the observation of iso-frequency contours in our technique. Furthermore, the iso-frequency contours provide information about the characteristics of the disorder and therefore serve as a feedback tool to improve fabrication processes.
  • Plasmonics enables deep-subwavelength concentration of light and has become important for fundamental studies as well as real-life applications. Two major existing platforms of plasmonics are metallic nanoparticles and metallic films. Metallic nanoparticles allow efficient coupling to far field radiation, yet their synthesis typically leads to poor material quality. Metallic films offer substantially higher quality materials, but their coupling to radiation is typically jeopardized due to the large momentum mismatch with free space. Here, we propose and theoretically investigate optically thin metallic films as an ideal platform for high-radiative-efficiency plasmonics. For far-field scattering, adding a thin high-quality metallic substrate enables a higher quality factor while maintaining the localization and tunability that the nanoparticle provides. For near-field spontaneous emission, a thin metallic substrate, of high quality or not, greatly improves the field overlap between the emitter environment and propagating surface plasmons, enabling high-Purcell (total enhancement > $10^4$), high-quantum-yield (> 50 %) spontaneous emission, even as the gap size vanishes (3$\sim$5 nm). The enhancement has almost spatially independent efficiency and does not suffer from quenching effects that commonly exist in previous structures.
  • We demonstrate thin, flexible, metamaterial films with a strong, narrowband, polarization- and angle-insensitive absorption designed for wavelengths near one millimeter. These structures, fabricated by photolithography on a commercially available, copper-backed polyimide substrate, are nearly indistinguishable to the unaided human eye but can be easily observed by imaging at the resonance frequency of the film. We demonstrate that these patterns can be used to mark or barcode objects for secure identification with a terahertz imaging system.
  • Launching of surface plasmons by swift electrons has long been utilized in electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to investigate plasmonic properties of ultrathin, or two-dimensional (2D), electron systems. However, its spatio-temporal process has never been revealed. This is because the impact of an electron will generate not only plasmons, but also photons, whose emission cannot be achieved at a single space-time point, as fundamentally determined from the uncertainty principle. Here, we propose that such a space-time limitation also applies to surface plasmon generation in EELS experiment. On the platform of graphene, we demonstrate within the framework of classical electrodynamics that the launching of 2D plasmons by an electron's impact is delayed after a hydrodynamic splashing-like process, which occurs during the plasmonic "formation time" when the electron traverses the "formation zone." Considering this newly revealed process, we show that previous estimates on the yields of graphene plasmons in EELS have been overestimated.
  • Traditionally, photonic crystal slabs can support resonances that are strongly confined to the slab but also couple to external radiation. However, when a photonic crystal slab is placed on a substrate, the resonance modes become less confined, and as the index contrast between slab and substrate decreases, they eventually disappear. Using the scale structure of the Dione juno butterfly wing as an inspiration, we present a low-index zigzag surface structure that supports resonance modes even without index contrast with the substrate. The zigzag structure supports resonances that are contained away from the substrate, which reduces the interaction between the resonance and the substrate. We experimentally verify the existence of substrate-independent resonances in the visible wavelength regime. Potential applications include substrate-independent structural color and light guiding.
  • We develop a formalism, based on the mode expansion method, to describe the guided resonances and bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic crystal slabs with one-dimensional periodicity. This approach provides analytic insights to the formation mechanisms of these states: the guided resonances arise from the transverse Fabry-P\'erot condition, and the divergence of the resonance lifetimes at the BICs is explained by a destructive interference of radiation from different propagating components inside the slab. We show BICs at the center and on the edge of the Brillouin zone protected by symmetry, as well as BICs at generic wave vectors not protected by symmetry.
  • Topological photonic states, inspired by robust chiral edge states in topological insulators, have recently been demonstrated in a few photonic systems, including an array of coupled on-chip ring resonators at communication wavelengths. However, the intrinsic difference between electrons and photons determines that the topological protection in time-reversal-invariant photonic systems does not share the same robustness as its counterpart in electronic topological insulators. Here, in a designer surface plasmon platform consisting of tunable metallic sub-wavelength structures, we construct photonic topological edge states and probe their robustness against a variety of defect classes, including some common time-reversal-invariant photonic defects that can break the topological protection, but do not exist in electronic topological insulators. This is also the first experimental realization of anomalous Floquet topological edge states, whose topological phase cannot be predicted by the usual Chern number topological invariants.
  • At visible and infrared frequencies, metals show tantalizing promise for strong subwavelength resonances, but material loss typically dampens the response. We derive fundamental limits to the optical response of absorptive systems, bounding the largest enhancements possible given intrinsic material losses. Through basic conservation-of-energy principles, we derive geometry-independent limits to per-volume absorption and scattering rates, and to local-density-of-states enhancements that represent the power radiated or expended by a dipole near a material body. We provide examples of structures that approach our absorption and scattering limits at any frequency, by contrast, we find that common "antenna" structures fall far short of our radiative LDOS bounds, suggesting the possibility for significant further improvement. Underlying the limits is a simple metric, $|\chi|^2 / \operatorname{Im} \chi$ for a material with susceptibility $\chi$, that enables broad technological evaluation of lossy materials across optical frequencies.
  • The physics of light-matter interactions is strongly constrained by both the small value of the fine-structure constant and the small size of the atom. Overcoming these limitations is a long-standing challenge. Recent theoretical and experimental breakthroughs have shown that two dimensional systems, such as graphene, can support strongly confined light in the form of plasmons. These 2D systems have a unique ability to squeeze the wavelength of light by over two orders of magnitude. Such high confinement requires a revisitation of the main assumptions of light-matter interactions. In this letter, we provide a general theory of light-matter interactions in 2D systems which support plasmons. This theory reveals that conventionally forbidden light-matter interactions, such as: high-order multipolar transitions, two-plasmon spontaneous emission, and spin-flip transitions can occur on very short time-scales - comparable to those of conventionally fast transitions. Our findings enable new platforms for spectroscopy, sensing, broadband light generation, and a potential test-ground for non-perturbative quantum electrodynamics.
  • We present shape-independent upper limits to the power--bandwidth product for a single resonance in an optical scatterer, with the bound depending only on the material susceptibility. We show that quasistatic metallic scatterers can nearly reach the limits, and we apply our approach to the problem of designing $N$ independent, subwavelength scatterers to achieve flat, broadband response even if they individually exhibit narrow resonant peaks.
  • We introduce a solid material that is itself invisible, possessing identical electromagnetic properties as air (i.e. not a cloak) at a desired frequency. Such a material could provide improved mechanical stability, electrical conduction and heat dissipation to a system, without disturbing incident electromagnetic radiation. One immediate application would be towards perfect antenna radomes. Unlike cloaks, such a transparent and self-invisible material has yet to be demonstrated. Previous research has shown that a single sphere or cylinder coated with plasmonic or dielectric layers can have a dark-state with considerably suppressed scattering cross-section, due to the destructive interference between two resonances in one of its scattering channels. Nevertheless, a massive collection of these objects will have an accumulated and detectable disturbance to the original field distribution. Here we overcome this bottleneck by lining up the dark-state frequencies in different channels. Specifically, we derive analytically, verify numerically and demonstrate experimentally that deliberately designed corrugated metallic wires can have record-low scattering amplitudes, achieved by aligning the nodal frequencies of the first two scattering channels. This enables an arbitrary assembly of these wires to be omnidirectionally invisible and the effective constitutive parameters nearly identical to air. Measured transmission spectra at microwave frequencies reveal indistinguishable results for all the arrangements of the 3D-printed samples studied.
  • We show that the well-known \v{C}erenkov Effect contains new phenomena arising from the quantum nature of charged particles. The \v{C}erenkov transition amplitudes allow coupling between the charged particle and the emitted photon through their orbital angular momentum (OAM) and spin, by scattering into preferred angles and polarizations. Importantly, the spectral response reveals a discontinuity immediately below a frequency cutoff that can occur in the optical region. Specifically, with proper shaping of electron beams (ebeams), we predict that the traditional \v{C}erenkov radiation angle splits into two distinctive cones of photonic shockwaves. One of the shockwaves can move along a backward cone, otherwise considered impossible for \v{C}erenkov radiation in ordinary matter. Our findings are observable for ebeams with realistic parameters, offering new applications including novel quantum optics sources, and open a new realm for \v{C}erenkov detectors involving the spin and orbital angular momentum of charged particles.
  • A bound state in the continuum (BIC) is an unusual localized state that is embedded in a continuum of extended states. Here, we present the general condition for BICs to arise from wave equation separability and show that the directionality and dimensionality of their resonant radiation can be controlled by exploiting perturbations of certain symmetry. Using this general framework, we construct new examples of separable BICs in realistic models of optical potentials for ultracold atoms, photonic systems, and systems described by tight binding. Such BICs with easily reconfigurable radiation patterns allow for applications such as the storage and release of waves at a controllable rate and direction, systems that switch between different dimensions of confinement, and experimental realizations in atomic, optical, and electronic systems.
  • A single Dirac cone on the surface is the hallmark of three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators, where the double degeneracy at the Dirac point is protected by time-reversal symmetry and the spin-splitting away from the point is provided by the spin-orbital coupling. Here we predict a single Dirac-cone surface state in a 3D photonic crystal, where the degeneracy at the Dirac point is protected by a nonsymmorphic glide reflection and the linear splitting away from it is enabled by breaking time-reversal symmetry. Such a gapless surface state is fully robust against random disorder of any type. This bosonic topological band structure is achieved by applying alternating magnetization to gap out the 3D "generalized Dirac points" discovered in the bulk of our crystal. The $Z_2$ bulk invariant is characterized through the evolution of Wannier centers. Our proposal--readily realizable using ferrimagnetic materials at microwave frequencies--can also be regarded as the photonic analog of topological crystalline insulators, providing the first 3D bosonic symmetry-protected topological system.
  • The Dirac cone underlies many unique electronic properties of graphene and topological insulators, and its band structure--two conical bands touching at a single point--has also been realized for photons in waveguide arrays, atoms in optical lattices, and through accidental degeneracy. Deformations of the Dirac cone often reveal intriguing properties; an example is the quantum Hall effect, where a constant magnetic field breaks the Dirac cone into isolated Landau levels. A seemingly unrelated phenomenon is the exceptional point, also known as the parity-time symmetry breaking point, where two resonances coincide in both their positions and widths. Exceptional points lead to counter-intuitive phenomena such as loss-induced transparency, unidirectional transmission or reflection, and lasers with reversed pump dependence or single-mode operation. These two fields of research are in fact connected: here we discover the ability of a Dirac cone to evolve into a ring of exceptional points, which we call an "exceptional ring." We experimentally demonstrate this concept in a photonic crystal slab. Angle-resolved reflection measurements of the photonic crystal slab reveal that the peaks of reflectivity follow the conical band structure of a Dirac cone from accidental degeneracy, whereas the complex eigenvalues of the system are deformed into a two-dimensional flat band enclosed by an exceptional ring. This deformation arises from the dissimilar radiation rates of dipole and quadrupole resonances, which play a role analogous to the loss and gain in parity-time symmetric systems. Our results indicate that the radiation that exists in any open system can fundamentally alter its physical properties in ways previously expected only in the presence of material loss and gain.