• Network alignment (NA) compares networks with the goal of finding a node mapping that uncovers highly similar (conserved) network regions. Existing NA methods are homogeneous, i.e., they can deal only with networks containing nodes and edges of one type. Due to increasing amounts of heterogeneous network data with nodes or edges of different types, we extend three recent state-of-the-art homogeneous NA methods, WAVE, MAGNA++, and SANA, to allow for heterogeneous NA for the first time. We introduce several algorithmic novelties. Namely, these existing methods compute homogeneous graphlet-based node similarities and then find high-scoring alignments with respect to these similarities, while simultaneously maximizing the amount of conserved edges. Instead, we extend homogeneous graphlets to their heterogeneous counterparts, which we then use to develop a new measure of heterogeneous node similarity. Also, we extend $S^3$, a state-of-the-art measure of edge conservation for homogeneous NA, to its heterogeneous counterpart. Then, we find high-scoring alignments with respect to our heterogeneous node similarity and edge conservation measures. In evaluations on synthetic and real-world biological networks, our proposed heterogeneous NA methods lead to higher-quality alignments and better robustness to noise in the data than their homogeneous counterparts. The software and data from this work is available upon request.
  • Given that low-mass stars have intrinsically low luminosities at optical wavelengths and a propensity for stellar activity, it is advantageous for radial velocity (RV) surveys of these objects to use near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. In this work we describe and test a novel RV extraction pipeline dedicated to retrieving RVs from low mass stars using NIR spectra taken by the CSHELL spectrograph at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, where a methane isotopologue gas cell is used for wavelength calibration. The pipeline minimizes the residuals between the observations and a spectral model composed of templates for the target star, the gas cell, and atmospheric telluric absorption; models of the line spread function, continuum curvature, and sinusoidal fringing; and a parameterization of the wavelength solution. The stellar template is derived iteratively from the science observations themselves without a need for separate observations dedicated to retrieving it. Despite limitations from CSHELL's narrow wavelength range and instrumental systematics, we are able to (1) obtain an RV precision of 35 m/s for the RV standard star GJ 15 A over a time baseline of 817 days, reaching the photon noise limit for our attained SNR, (2) achieve ~3 m/s RV precision for the M giant SV Peg over a baseline of several days and confirm its long-term RV trend due to stellar pulsations, as well as obtain nightly noise floors of ~2 - 6 m/s, and (3) show that our data are consistent with the known masses, periods, and orbital eccentricities of the two most massive planets orbiting GJ 876. Future applications of our pipeline to RV surveys using the next generation of NIR spectrographs, such as iSHELL, will enable the potential detection of Super-Earths and Mini-Neptunes in the habitable zones of M dwarfs.
  • Robo-AO, a fully autonomous, laser guide star adaptive optics and science system, is being commissioned at Palomar Observatory's 60-inch telescope. Here we discuss the instrument, scientific goals and results of initial on-sky operation.
  • The NSF's Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship (AAPF) is exceptional among the available postdoctoral awards in Astronomy and Astrophysics. The fellowship is one of the few that allows postdoctoral researchers to pursue an original research program, of their own design, at the U.S. institution of their choice. However, what makes this fellowship truly unique is the ability of Fellows to lead an equally challenging, original educational program simultaneously. The legacy of this singular fellowship has been to encourage and advance leaders in the field who are equally as passionate about their own research as they are about sharing that research and their passion for astronomy with students and the public. In this positional paper we address the importance of fellowships like the AAPF to the astronomical profession by identifying the science and educational contributions that Fellows have made to the community. Further, we recommend that fellowships that encourage leading postdoctoral researchers to also become leaders in Astronomy education be continued and expanded.