• Time-delay cosmography provides a unique way to directly measure the Hubble constant ($H_{0}$). The precision of the $H_{0}$ measurement depends on the uncertainties in the time-delay measurements, the mass distribution of the main deflector(s), and the mass distribution along the line of sight. Tie and Kochanek (2018) have proposed a new microlensing effect on time delays based on differential magnification of the accretion disc of the lensed quasar. If real, this effect could significantly broaden the uncertainty on the time delay measurements by up to $30\%$ for lens systems such as PG1115+080, which have relatively short time delays and monitoring over several different epochs. In this paper we develop a new technique that uses the time-delay ratios and simulated microlensing maps within a Bayesian framework in order to limit the allowed combinations of microlensing delays and thus to lessen the uncertainties due to the proposed effect. We show that, under the assumption of Tie and Kochanek (2018), the uncertainty on the time-delay distance ($D_{\Delta t}$, which is proportional to 1/$H_{0}$) of short time-delay ($\sim18$ days) lens, PG1115+080, increases from $\sim7\%$ to $\sim10\%$ by simultaneously fitting the three time-delay measurements from the three different datasets across twenty years, while in the case of long time-delay ($\sim90$ days) lens, the microlensing effect on time delays is negligible as the uncertainty on $D_{\Delta t}$ of RXJ1131-1231 only increases from $\sim2.5\%$ to $\sim2.6\%$.
  • We use 2.0 Msec of Chandra observations to investigate the cocoon shocks of Cygnus A and some implications for its lobes and jet. Measured shock Mach numbers vary in the range 1.18-1.66 around the cocoon. We estimate a total outburst energy of $\simeq 4.7\times10^{60}\rm\ erg$, with an age of $\simeq 2 \times 10^{7}\rm\ yr$. The average postshock pressure is found to be $8.6 \pm 0.3 \times 10^{-10}\rm\ erg\ cm^{-3}$, which agrees with the average pressure of the thin rim of compressed gas between the radio lobes and shocks, as determined from X-ray spectra. However, average rim pressures are found to be lower in the western lobe than in the eastern lobe by $\simeq 20\%$. Pressure estimates for hotspots A and D from synchrotron self-Compton models imply that each jet exerts a ram pressure $\gtrsim$ 3 times its static pressure, consistent with the positions of the hotspots moving about on the cocoon shock over time. A steady, one-dimensional flow model is used to estimate jet properties, finding mildly relativistic flow speeds within the allowed parameter range. Models in which the jet carries a negligible flux of rest mass are consistent with with the observed properties of the jets and hotspots. This favors the jets being light, implying that the kinetic power and momentum flux are carried primarily by the internal energy of the jet plasma rather than by its rest mass.
  • Accurate and precise measurements of the Hubble constant are critical for testing our current standard cosmological model and revealing possibly new physics. With Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, each strong gravitational lens system with measured time delays can allow one to determine the Hubble constant with an uncertainty of $\sim 7\%$. Since HST will not last forever, we explore adaptive-optics (AO) imaging as an alternative that can provide higher angular resolution than HST imaging but has a less stable point spread function (PSF) due to atmospheric distortion. To make AO imaging useful for time-delay-lens cosmography, we develop a method to extract the unknown PSF directly from the imaging of strongly lensed quasars. In a blind test with two mock data sets created with different PSFs, we are able to recover the important cosmological parameters (time-delay distance, external shear, lens mass profile slope, and total Einstein radius). Our analysis of the Keck AO image of the strong lens system RXJ1131-1231 shows that the important parameters for cosmography agree with those based on HST imaging and modeling within 1-$\sigma$ uncertainties. Most importantly, the constraint on the model time-delay distance by using AO imaging with $0.045"$resolution is tighter by $\sim 50\%$ than the constraint of time-delay distance by using HST imaging with $0.09"$when a power-law mass distribution for the lens system is adopted. Our PSF reconstruction technique is generic and applicable to data sets that have multiple nearby point sources, enabling scientific studies that require high-precision models of the PSF.
  • Compressed sensing theory is slowly making its way to solve more and more astronomical inverse problems. We address here the application of sparse representations, convex optimization and proximal theory to radio interferometric imaging. First, we expose the theory behind interferometric imaging, sparse representations and convex optimization, and second, we illustrate their application with numerical tests with SASIR, an implementation of the FISTA, a Forward-Backward splitting algorithm hosted in a LOFAR imager. Various tests have been conducted in Garsden et al., 2015. The main results are: i) an improved angular resolution (super resolution of a factor ~2) with point sources as compared to CLEAN on the same data, ii) correct photometry measurements on a field of point sources at high dynamic range and iii) the imaging of extended sources with improved fidelity. SASIR provides better reconstructions (five time less residuals) of the extended emission as compared to CLEAN. With the advent of large radiotelescopes, there is scope for improving classical imaging methods with convex optimization methods combined with sparse representations.
  • The 8 o'clock arc is a gravitationally lensed Lyman Break Galaxy (LBG) at redshift z=2.73 that has a star-formation rate (SFR) of 270 solar-mass/year (derived from optical and near-infrared spectroscopy). Taking the magnification of the system ~12 and the SFR into account, the expected flux density of any associated radio emission at 1.4 GHz is predicted to be just 0.1 mJy. However, the lens system is found to be coincident with a radio source detected in the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) Sky Survey with a flux density of ~5 mJy. If this flux density is attributed to the lensed LBG then it would imply a SFR ~11000 solar-mass/year, in contrast with the optical and near-infrared derived value. We want to investigate the radio properties of this system, and independently determine the SFR for the LBG from its lensed radio emission. We have carried out new high resolution imaging with the VLA ain A and B-configurations at 1.4 and 5 GHz. We find that the radio emission is dominated by a radio-loud AGN associated with the lensing galaxy. The radio-jet from the AGN partially covers the lensed arc of the LBG, and we do not detect any radio emission from the unobscured region of the arc down to a 3 sigma flux-density limit of 108 micro-Jy/beam. Using the radio data, we place a limit of <750 solar-mass/year for the SFR of the LBG, which is consistent with the results from the optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. We expect that the sensitivity of the Expanded VLA will be sufficient to detect many high redshift LBGs that are gravitationally lensed after only a few hours of observing time. The high angular resolution provided by the EVLA will also allow detailed studies of the lensed galaxies and determine if there is radio emission from the lens.
  • We present the first automated spectroscopic search for disk-galaxy lenses, using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database. We follow up eight gravitational lens candidates, selected among a sample of ~40000 candidate massive disk galaxies, using a combination of ground-based imaging and long-slit spectroscopy. We confirm two gravitational lens systems: one probable disk galaxy, and one probable S0 galaxy. The remaining systems are four promising disk-galaxy lens candidates, as well as two probable gravitational lenses whose lens galaxy might be an S0 galaxy. The redshifts of the lenses are z_lens ~ 0.1. The redshift range of the background sources is z_source ~ 0.3 - 0.7. The systems presented here are (confirmed or candidate) galaxy-galaxy lensing systems, that is, systems where the multiple images are faint and extended, allowing an accurate determination of the lens galaxy mass and light distributions without contamination from the background galaxy. Moreover, the low redshift of the (confirmed or candidates) lens galaxies is favorable for measuring rotation points to complement the lensing study. We estimate the rest-frame total mass-to-light ratio within the Einstein radius for the two confirmed lenses: we find M_tot/L_I = 5.4 +- 1.5 within 3.9 +- 0.9 kpc for SDSS J081230.30+543650.9, and M_tot/L_I = 1.5 +- 0.9 within 1.4 +- 0.8 kpc for SDSS J145543.55+530441.2 (all in solar units). Hubble Space Telescope or Adaptive Optics imaging is needed to further study the systems.