• Nanostructures can be bound together at equilibrium by the van der Waals (vdW) effect, a small but ubiquitous many-body attraction that presents challenges to density functional theory. How does the binding energy depend upon the size or number of atoms in one of a pair of identical nanostructures? To answer this question, we treat each nanostructure properly as a whole object, not as a collection of atoms. Our calculations start from an accurate static dipole polarizability for each considered nanostructure, and an accurate equilibrium center-to-center distance for the pair (the latter from experiment, or from the vdW-DF-cx functional). We consider the competition in each term $-C_{2k}/d^{2k}$ ($k=3, 4, 5$) of the long-range vdW series for the interaction energy, between the size dependence of the vdW coefficient $C_{2k}$ and that of the $2k$-th power of the center-to-center distance $d$. The damping of these vdW terms can be negligible, but in any case it does not affect the size dependence for a given term in the absence of non-vdW binding. To our surprise, the vdW energy can be size-independent for quasi-spherical nanoclusters bound to one another by vdW interaction, even with strong nonadditivity of the vdW coefficient, as demonstrated for fullerenes. We also show that, for low-dimensional systems, the vdW interaction yields the strongest size-dependence, in stark contrast to that of fullerenes. We illustrate this with parallel planar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Other cases are between, as shown by sodium clusters.
  • The equilibrium binding energy is an important factor in the design of materials and devices. However, it presents great computational challenges for materials built up from nanostructures. Here we investigate the binding-energy scaling law from first-principles calculations. We show that the equilibrium binding energy per atom between identical nanostructures can scale up or down with nanostructure size. From the energy scaling law, we predict finite large-size limits of binding energy per atom. We find that there are two competing factors in the determination of the binding energy: Nonadditivities of van der Waals coefficients and center-to-center distance between nanostructures. To uncode the detail, the nonadditivity of the static multipole polarizability is investigated. We find that the higher-order multipole polarizability displays ultra-strong intrinsic nonadditivity, no matter if the dipole polarizability is additive or not.
  • Water is of the utmost importance for life and technology. However, a genuinely predictive ab initio model of water has eluded scientists. We demonstrate that a fully ab initio approach, relying on the strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) density functional, provides such a description of water. SCAN accurately describes the balance among covalent bonds, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals interactions that dictates the structure and dynamics of liquid water. Notably, SCAN captures the density difference between water and ice I{\it h} at ambient conditions, as well as many important structural, electronic, and dynamic properties of liquid water. These successful predictions of the versatile SCAN functional open the gates to study complex processes in aqueous phase chemistry and the interactions of water with other materials in an efficient, accurate, and predictive, ab initio manner.
  • Originating from a broken spatial inversion symmetry, ferroelectricity is a functionality of materials with an electric dipole that can be switched by external electric fields. Spontaneous polarization is a crucial ferroelectric property, and its amplitude is determined by the strength of polar structural distortions. Density functional theory (DFT) is one of the most widely used theoretical methods to study ferroelectric properties, yet it is limited by the levels of approximations in electron exchange-correlation. On the one hand, the local density approximation (LDA) is considered to be more accurate for the conventional perovskite ferroelectrics such as BaTiO3 and PbTiO3 than the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), which suffers from the so-called super-tetragonality error. On the other hand, GGA is more suitable for hydrogen-bonded ferroelectrics than LDA, which largely overestimates the strength of hydrogen bonding in general. We show here that the recently developed general-purpose strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-GGA functional significantly improves over the traditional LDA/GGA for structural, electric, and energetic properties of diversely-bonded ferroelectric materials with a comparable computational effort, and thus enhances largely the predictive power of DFT in studies of ferroelectric materials. We also address the observed system-dependent performances of LDA and GGA for ferroelectrics from a chemical bonding point of view.
  • The Perdew-Zunger self-interaction correction cures many common problems associated with semilocal density functionals, but suffers from a size-extensivity problem when Kohn-Sham orbitals are used in the correction. Fermi-L\"{o}wdin-orbital self-interaction correction (FLOSIC) solves the size-extensivity problem, allowing its use in periodic systems and resulting in better accuracy in finite systems. Although the previously published FLOSIC algorithm [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 121103 (2014)] appears to work well in many cases, it is not fully self-consistent. This would be particularly problematic for systems where the occupied manifold is strongly changed by the correction. In this paper we demonstrate a new algorithm for FLOSIC to achieve full self-consistency with only marginal increase of computational cost. The resulting total energies are found to be lower than previously reported non-self-consistent results.
  • We have computed the surface energies, work functions, and interlayer surface relaxations of clean (111), (110), and (100) surfaces of Al, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Pt, and Au. Many of these metallic surfaces have technological or catalytic applications. We compare experimental reference values to those of the local density approximation (LDA), the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized gradient approximation (GGA), the PBEsol (PBE for solids) GGA, the SCAN meta-GGA, and SCAN+rVV10 (SCAN with a long-range van der Waals or vdW correction). The closest agreement with uncertain experimental values is achieved by the simplest density functional (LDA) and by the most sophisticated general-purpose one (SCAN+rVV10). The long-range vdW interaction increases the surface energies by about 10%, and the work functions by about 1%. LDA works for metal surfaces through a stronger-than-usual error cancellation. PBE yields the most-underestimated and presumably least accurate surface energies and work functions. Surface energies within the random phase approximation (RPA) are also reported. Interlayer relaxations from different functionals are in reasonable agreement with one another, and usually with experiment.
  • The fundamental energy gap of a periodic solid distinguishes insulators from metals and characterizes low-energy single-electron excitations. But the gap in the band-structure of the exact multiplicative Kohn-Sham (KS) potential substantially underestimates the fundamental gap, a major limitation of KS density functional theory. Here we give a simple proof of a new theorem: In generalized KS theory (GKS), the band gap of an extended system equals the fundamental gap for the approximate functional if the GKS potential operator is continuous and the density change is delocalized when an electron or hole is added. Our theorem explains how GKS band gaps from meta-generalized gradient approximations (meta-GGAs) and hybrid functionals can be more realistic than those from GGAs or even from the exact KS potential. The theorem also follows from earlier work. The band edges in the GKS one-electron spectrum are also related to measurable energies. A linear chain of hydrogen molecules, solid aluminum arsenide, and solid argon provide numerical illustrations.
  • The structural and energetic properties of layered materials propose a challenge to density functional theory with common semilocal approximations to the exchange-correlation. By combining the most-widely used semilocal generalized gradient approximation (GGA), Perdew--Burke--Ernzerhof (PBE), with the revised Vydrov--Van Voorhis non-local correlation functional (rVV10), both excellent structural and energetic properties of 28 layered materials were recovered with a judicious parameter selection. We term the resulting functional as PBE+rVV10L with "L" denoting for layered materials. Such combination is not new, and involves only refitting a single global parameter, however the resulting excellency suggests such corrected PBE for many aspects of theoretical studies on layered materials. For comparison, we also present the results for PBE+rVV10 where the parameter is determined by the 22 interaction energies between molecules.
  • We present a new paradigm for the design of exchange-correlation functionals in density-functional theory. Electron pairs are correlated explicitly by means of the recently developed second order Bethe-Goldstone equation (BGE2) approach. Here we propose a screened BGE2 (sBGE2) variant that efficiently regulates the coupling of a given electron pair. sBGE2 correctly dissociates H$_2$ and H$_2^+$, a problem that has been regarded as a great challenge in density-functional theory for a long time. The sBGE2 functional is then taken as a building block for an orbital-dependent functional, termed ZRPS, which is a natural extension of the PBE0 hybrid functional. While worsening the good performance of sBGE2 in H$_2$ and H$_2^{+}$, ZRPS yields a remarkable and consistent improvement over other density functionals across various chemical environments from weak to strong correlation.
  • Unlike the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), calculations with meta-generalized gradient approximations (meta-GGA) are usually done according to the generalized Kohn-Sham (gKS) formalism. The exchange-correlation potential of the gKS equation is non-multiplicative, which prevents systematic comparison of meta-GGA bandstructures to those of the LDA and the GGA. We implement the optimized effective potential (OEP) of the meta-GGA for periodic systems, which allows us to carry out meta-GGA calculations in the same KS manner as for the LDA and the GGA. We apply the OEP to several meta-GGAs, including the new SCAN functional [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 036402 (2015)]. We find that the KS gaps and KS band structures of meta-GGAs are close to those of GGAs. They are smaller than the more realistic gKS gaps of meta-GGAs, but probably close to the less-realistic gaps in the band structure of the exact KS potential, as can be seen by comparing with the gaps of the EXX+RPA OEP potential. The well-known grid sensitivity of meta-GGAs is much more severe in OEP calculations.
  • The newly developed "strongly constrained and appropriately normed" (SCAN) meta-generalized-gradient approximation (meta-GGA) can generally improve over the non-empirical Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) GGA not only for strong chemical bonding, but also for the intermediate-range van der Waals (vdW) interaction. However, the long-range vdW interaction is still missing. To remedy this, we propose here pairing SCAN with the non-local correlation part from the rVV10 vdW density functional, with only two empirical parameters. The resulting SCAN+rVV10 yields excellent geometric and energetic results not only for molecular systems, but also for solids and layered-structure materials, as well as the adsorption of benzene on coinage metal surfaces. Especially, SCAN+rVV10 outperforms all current methods with comparable computational efficiencies, accurately reproducing the three most fundamental parameters---the inter-layer binding energies, inter-, and intra-layer lattice constants---for 28 layered-structure materials. Hence, we have achieved with SCAN+rVV10 a promising vdW density functional for general geometries, with minimal empiricism.
  • The uniform electron gas and the hydrogen atom play fundamental roles in condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry. The former has an infinite number of electrons uniformly distributed over the neutralizing positively-charged background, and the latter only one electron bound to the proton. The uniform electron gas was used to derive the local spin density approximation (LSDA) to the exchange-correlation functional that undergirds the development of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory. We show here that the ground-state exchange-correlation energies of the hydrogen atom and many other 1- and 2-electron systems are modeled surprisingly well by a different local spin density approximation (LSDA0). Our LSDA0 is constructed to satisfy exact constraints, but agrees surprisingly well with the exact results for a uniform two-electron density in a finite, curved three-dimensional space. We also apply LSDA0 to excited or noded 1-electron densities. Furthermore, we show that the locality of an orbital can be measured by the ratio between the exact exchange energy and its optimal lower bound.
  • Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) is a widely-used electronic structure theory for materials as well as molecules. DFT is needed especially for large systems, ab initio molecular dynamics, and high-throughput searches for functional materials. DFT's accuracy and computational efficiency are limited by the approximation to its exchange-correlation energy. Currently, the local density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximations (GGAs) dominate materials computation mainly due to their efficiency. We show here that the recently developed non-empirical strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-GGA improves significantly over LDA and the standard Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof GGA for geometries and energies of diversely-bonded materials (including covalent, metallic, ionic, hydrogen, and van der Waals bonds) at comparable efficiency. Thus SCAN may be useful even for soft matter. Often SCAN matches or improves upon the accuracy of a computationally expensive hybrid functional, at almost-GGA cost. SCAN is therefore expected to have a broad impact on materials science.
  • Contrary to standard coupled cluster doubles (CCD) and Brueckner doubles (BD), singlet-paired analogues of CCD and BD (denoted here as CCD0 and BD0) do not break down when static correlation is present, but neglect substantial amounts of dynamic correlation. In fact, CCD0 and BD0 do not account for any contributions from multielectron excitations involving only same-spin electrons at all. We exploit this feature to add---without introducing double counting, self-interaction, or increase in cost---the missing correlation to these methods via meta-GGA density functionals (TPSS and SCAN). Furthermore, we improve upon these CCD0+DFT blends by invoking range separation: the short- and long-range correlations absent in CCD0/BD0 are evaluated with DFT and the direct random phase approximation (dRPA), respectively. This corrects the description of long-range van der Waals forces. Comprehensive benchmarking shows that the combinations presented here are very accurate for weakly correlated systems, while also providing a reasonable description of strongly correlated problems without resorting to symmetry breaking.
  • The ground-state energy, electron density, and related properties of ordinary matter can be computed efficiently when the exchange-correlation energy as a functional of the density is approximated semilocally. We propose the first meta-GGA (meta-generalized gradient approximation) that is fully constrained, obeying all 17 known exact constraints that a meta-GGA can. It is also exact or nearly exact for a set of appropriate norms, including rare-gas atoms and nonbonded interactions. This SCAN (strongly constrained and appropriately normed) meta-GGA achieves remarkable accuracy for systems where the exact exchange-correlation hole is localized near its electron, and especially for lattice constants and weak interactions.
  • Approximations to the exact density functional for the exchange-correlation energy of a many-electron ground state can be constructed by satisfying constraints that are universal, i.e., valid for all electron densities. Gedanken densities are designed for the purpose of this construction, but need not be realistic. The uniform electron gas is an old gedanken density. Here, we propose a spherical two-electron gedanken density in which the dimensionless density gradient can be an arbitrary positive constant wherever the density is non-zero. The Lieb-Oxford lower bound on the exchange energy can be satisfied within a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) by bounding its enhancement factor or simplest GGA exchange-energy density. This enhancement-factor bound is well known to be sufficient, but our gedanken density shows that it is also necessary. The conventional exact exchange-energy density satisfies no such local bound, but energy densities are not unique, and the simplest GGA exchange-energy density is not an approximation to it. We further derive a strongly and optimally tightened bound on the exchange enhancement factor of a two-electron density, which is satisfied by the local density approximation but is violated by all published GGA's or meta-GGA's. Finally, some consequences of the non-uniform density-scaling behavior for the asymptotics of the exchange enhancement factor of a GGA or meta-GGA are given.
  • Standard spin-density functionals for the exchange-correlation energy of a many-electron ground state make serious self-interaction errors which can be corrected by the Perdew-Zunger self-interaction correction (SIC). We propose a size-extensive construction of SIC orbitals which, unlike earlier constructions, makes SIC computationally efficient, and a true spin-density functional. The SIC orbitals are constructed from a unitary transformation that is explicitly dependent on the non-interacting one-particle density matrix. When this SIC is applied to the local spin-density approximation, improvements are found for the atomization energies of molecules.
  • Computationally-efficient semilocal approximations of density functional theory at the level of the local spin density approximation (LSDA) or generalized gradient approximation (GGA) poorly describe weak interactions. We show improved descriptions for weak bonds (without loss of accuracy for strong ones) from a newly-developed semilocal meta-GGA (MGGA), by applying it to molecules, surfaces, and solids. We argue that this improvement comes from using the right MGGA dimensionless ingredient to recognize all types of orbital overlap.
  • We present a global hybrid meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) with three empirical parameters, as well as its underlying semilocal meta-GGA and a meta-GGA with only one empirical parameter. All of them are based on the new meta-GGA resulting from the understanding of kinetic-energy-density dependence [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 051101 (2012)]. The obtained functionals show robust performances on the considered molecular systems for the properties of heats of formation, barrier heights, and noncovalent interactions. The pair-wise additive dispersion corrections to the functionals are also presented.
  • By extrapolating the energies of non-relativistic atoms and their ions with up to 3000 electrons within Kohn-Sham density functional theory, we find that the ionization potential remains finite and increases across a row, even as $Z\rightarrow\infty$. The local density approximation becomes chemically accurate (and possibly exact) in some cases. Extended Thomas-Fermi theory matches the shell-average of both the ionization potential and density change. Exact results are given in the limit of weak electron-electron repulsion.
  • Semilocal density functionals for the exchange-correlation energy are needed for large electronic systems. The Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) is semilocal and usefully accurate, but predicts too-long lattice constants. Recent "GGA's for solids" yield good lattice constants but poor atomization energies of molecules. We show that the construction principle for one of them (restoring the density gradient expansion for exchange over a wide range of densities) can be used to construct a "revised TPSS" meta-GGA with accurate lattice constants, surface energies, and atomization energies for ordinary matter.
  • In recent work, generalized gradient approximations (GGA's) have been constructed from the energy density of the Airy gas for exchange but not for correlation. We report the random phase approximation (RPA) conventional correlation energy density of the Airy gas, the simplest edge electron gas, in which the auxiliary noninteracting electrons experience a linear potential. By fitting the Airy-gas RPA exchange-correlation energy density and making an accurate short-range correction to RPA, we propose a simple beyond-RPA GGA density functional ("ARPA+") for the exchange-correlation energy. Our functional, tested for jellium surfaces, atoms, molecules and solids, improves mildly over the local spin density approximation for atomization energies and lattice constants without much worsening the already-good surface exchange-correlation energies.
  • We assess the performance of recent density functionals for the exchange-correlation energy of a nonmolecular solid, by applying accurate calculations with the GAUSSIAN, BAND, and VASP codes to a test set of 24 solid metals and non-metals. The functionals tested are the modified Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation (PBEsol GGA), the second-order GGA (SOGGA), and the Armiento-Mattsson 2005 (AM05) GGA. For completeness, we also test more-standard functionals: the local density approximation, the original PBE GGA, and the Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) meta-GGA. We find that the recent density functionals for solids reach a high accuracy for bulk properties (lattice constant and bulk modulus). For the cohesive energy, PBE is better than PBEsol overall, as expected, but PBEsol is actually better for the alkali metals and alkali halides. For fair comparison of calculated and experimental results, we consider the zero-point phonon and finite-temperature effects ignored by many workers. We show how Gaussian basis sets and inaccurate experimental reference data may affect the rating of the quality of the functionals. The results show that PBEsol and AM05 perform somewhat differently from each other for alkali metal, alkaline earth metal and alkali halide crystals (where the maximum value of the reduced density gradient is about 2), but perform very similarly for most of the other solids (where it is often about 1). Our explanation for this is consistent with the importance of exchange-correlation nonlocality in regions of core-valence overlap.
  • We propose a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the angle- and system-averaged exchange-correlation hole of a many-electron system. This hole, which satisfies known exact constraints, recovers the PBEsol (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof for solids) exchange-correlation energy functional, a GGA that accurately describes the equilibrium properties of densely packed solids and their surfaces. We find that our PBEsol exchange-correlation hole describes the wavevector analysis of the jellium exchange-correlation surface energy in agreement with a sophisticated time-dependent density-functional calculation (whose three-dimensional wavevector analysis we report here).
  • Successful modern generalized gradient approximations (GGA's) are biased toward atomic energies. Restoration of the first-principles gradient expansion for exchange over a wide range of density gradients eliminates this bias. We introduce PBEsol, a revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof GGA that improves equilibrium properties of densely-packed solids and their surfaces.