• We study the problem of testing identity against a given distribution with a focus on the high confidence regime. More precisely, given samples from an unknown distribution $p$ over $n$ elements, an explicitly given distribution $q$, and parameters $0< \epsilon, \delta < 1$, we wish to distinguish, {\em with probability at least $1-\delta$}, whether the distributions are identical versus $\varepsilon$-far in total variation distance. Most prior work focused on the case that $\delta = \Omega(1)$, for which the sample complexity of identity testing is known to be $\Theta(\sqrt{n}/\epsilon^2)$. Given such an algorithm, one can achieve arbitrarily small values of $\delta$ via black-box amplification, which multiplies the required number of samples by $\Theta(\log(1/\delta))$. We show that black-box amplification is suboptimal for any $\delta = o(1)$, and give a new identity tester that achieves the optimal sample complexity. Our new upper and lower bounds show that the optimal sample complexity of identity testing is \[ \Theta\left( \frac{1}{\epsilon^2}\left(\sqrt{n \log(1/\delta)} + \log(1/\delta) \right)\right) \] for any $n, \varepsilon$, and $\delta$. For the special case of uniformity testing, where the given distribution is the uniform distribution $U_n$ over the domain, our new tester is surprisingly simple: to test whether $p = U_n$ versus $d_{\mathrm TV}(p, U_n) \geq \varepsilon$, we simply threshold $d_{\mathrm TV}(\widehat{p}, U_n)$, where $\widehat{p}$ is the empirical probability distribution. The fact that this simple "plug-in" estimator is sample-optimal is surprising, even in the constant $\delta$ case. Indeed, it was believed that such a tester would not attain sublinear sample complexity even for constant values of $\varepsilon$ and $\delta$.
  • While Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) have demonstrated promising performance on multiple vision tasks, their learning dynamics are not yet well understood, both in theory and in practice. To address this issue, we study GAN dynamics in a simple yet rich parametric model that exhibits several of the common problematic convergence behaviors such as vanishing gradients, mode collapse, and diverging or oscillatory behavior. In spite of the non-convex nature of our model, we are able to perform a rigorous theoretical analysis of its convergence behavior. Our analysis reveals an interesting dichotomy: a GAN with an optimal discriminator provably converges, while first order approximations of the discriminator steps lead to unstable GAN dynamics and mode collapse. Our result suggests that using first order discriminator steps (the de-facto standard in most existing GAN setups) might be one of the factors that makes GAN training challenging in practice.
  • We investigate the problem of identity testing for multidimensional histogram distributions. A distribution $p: D \rightarrow \mathbb{R}_+$, where $D \subseteq \mathbb{R}^d$, is called a {$k$-histogram} if there exists a partition of the domain into $k$ axis-aligned rectangles such that $p$ is constant within each such rectangle. Histograms are one of the most fundamental non-parametric families of distributions and have been extensively studied in computer science and statistics. We give the first identity tester for this problem with {\em sub-learning} sample complexity in any fixed dimension and a nearly-matching sample complexity lower bound. More specifically, let $q$ be an unknown $d$-dimensional $k$-histogram and $p$ be an explicitly given $k$-histogram. We want to correctly distinguish, with probability at least $2/3$, between the case that $p = q$ versus $\|p-q\|_1 \geq \epsilon$. We design a computationally efficient algorithm for this hypothesis testing problem with sample complexity $O((\sqrt{k}/\epsilon^2) \log^{O(d)}(k/\epsilon))$. Our algorithm is robust to model misspecification, i.e., succeeds even if $q$ is only promised to be {\em close} to a $k$-histogram. Moreover, for $k = 2^{\Omega(d)}$, we show a nearly-matching sample complexity lower bound of $\Omega((\sqrt{k}/\epsilon^2) (\log(k/\epsilon)/d)^{\Omega(d)})$ when $d\geq 2$. Prior to our work, the sample complexity of the $d=1$ case was well-understood, but no algorithm with sub-learning sample complexity was known, even for $d=2$. Our new upper and lower bounds have interesting conceptual implications regarding the relation between learning and testing in this setting.
  • We present an algorithm that, with high probability, generates a random spanning tree from an edge-weighted undirected graph in $\tilde{O}(n^{4/3}m^{1/2}+n^{2})$ time (The $\tilde{O}(\cdot)$ notation hides $\operatorname{polylog}(n)$ factors). The tree is sampled from a distribution where the probability of each tree is proportional to the product of its edge weights. This improves upon the previous best algorithm due to Colbourn et al. that runs in matrix multiplication time, $O(n^\omega)$. For the special case of unweighted graphs, this improves upon the best previously known running time of $\tilde{O}(\min\{n^{\omega},m\sqrt{n},m^{4/3}\})$ for $m \gg n^{5/3}$ (Colbourn et al. '96, Kelner-Madry '09, Madry et al. '15). The effective resistance metric is essential to our algorithm, as in the work of Madry et al., but we eschew determinant-based and random walk-based techniques used by previous algorithms. Instead, our algorithm is based on Gaussian elimination, and the fact that effective resistance is preserved in the graph resulting from eliminating a subset of vertices (called a Schur complement). As part of our algorithm, we show how to compute $\epsilon$-approximate effective resistances for a set $S$ of vertex pairs via approximate Schur complements in $\tilde{O}(m+(n + |S|)\epsilon^{-2})$ time, without using the Johnson-Lindenstrauss lemma which requires $\tilde{O}( \min\{(m + |S|)\epsilon^{-2}, m+n\epsilon^{-4} +|S|\epsilon^{-2}\})$ time. We combine this approximation procedure with an error correction procedure for handing edges where our estimate isn't sufficiently accurate.
  • We show variants of spectral sparsification routines can preserve the total spanning tree counts of graphs, which by Kirchhoff's matrix-tree theorem, is equivalent to determinant of a graph Laplacian minor, or equivalently, of any SDDM matrix. Our analyses utilizes this combinatorial connection to bridge between statistical leverage scores / effective resistances and the analysis of random graphs by [Janson, Combinatorics, Probability and Computing `94]. This leads to a routine that in quadratic time, sparsifies a graph down to about $n^{1.5}$ edges in ways that preserve both the determinant and the distribution of spanning trees (provided the sparsified graph is viewed as a random object). Extending this algorithm to work with Schur complements and approximate Choleksy factorizations leads to algorithms for counting and sampling spanning trees which are nearly optimal for dense graphs. We give an algorithm that computes a $(1 \pm \delta)$ approximation to the determinant of any SDDM matrix with constant probability in about $n^2 \delta^{-2}$ time. This is the first routine for graphs that outperforms general-purpose routines for computing determinants of arbitrary matrices. We also give an algorithm that generates in about $n^2 \delta^{-2}$ time a spanning tree of a weighted undirected graph from a distribution with total variation distance of $\delta$ from the $w$-uniform distribution .
  • We study the fundamental problems of (i) uniformity testing of a discrete distribution, and (ii) closeness testing between two discrete distributions with bounded $\ell_2$-norm. These problems have been extensively studied in distribution testing and sample-optimal estimators are known for them~\cite{Paninski:08, CDVV14, VV14, DKN:15}. In this work, we show that the original collision-based testers proposed for these problems ~\cite{GRdist:00, BFR+:00} are sample-optimal, up to constant factors. Previous analyses showed sample complexity upper bounds for these testers that are optimal as a function of the domain size $n$, but suboptimal by polynomial factors in the error parameter $\epsilon$. Our main contribution is a new tight analysis establishing that these collision-based testers are information-theoretically optimal, up to constant factors, both in the dependence on $n$ and in the dependence on $\epsilon$.
  • In this paper we introduce a notion of spectral approximation for directed graphs. While there are many potential ways one might define approximation for directed graphs, most of them are too strong to allow sparse approximations in general. In contrast, we prove that for our notion of approximation, such sparsifiers do exist, and we show how to compute them in almost linear time. Using this notion of approximation, we provide a general framework for solving asymmetric linear systems that is broadly inspired by the work of [Peng-Spielman, STOC`14]. Applying this framework in conjunction with our sparsification algorithm, we obtain an almost linear time algorithm for solving directed Laplacian systems associated with Eulerian Graphs. Using this solver in the recent framework of [Cohen-Kelner-Peebles-Peng-Sidford-Vladu, FOCS`16], we obtain almost linear time algorithms for solving a directed Laplacian linear system, computing the stationary distribution of a Markov chain, computing expected commute times in a directed graph, and more. For each of these problems, our algorithms improves the previous best running times of $O((nm^{3/4} + n^{2/3} m) \log^{O(1)} (n \kappa \epsilon^{-1}))$ to $O((m + n2^{O(\sqrt{\log{n}\log\log{n}})}) \log^{O(1)} (n \kappa \epsilon^{-1}))$ where $n$ is the number of vertices in the graph, $m$ is the number of edges, $\kappa$ is a natural condition number associated with the problem, and $\epsilon$ is the desired accuracy. We hope these results open the door for further studies into directed spectral graph theory, and will serve as a stepping stone for designing a new generation of fast algorithms for directed graphs.
  • In this paper, we provide faster algorithms for computing various fundamental quantities associated with random walks on a directed graph, including the stationary distribution, personalized PageRank vectors, hitting times, and escape probabilities. In particular, on a directed graph with $n$ vertices and $m$ edges, we show how to compute each quantity in time $\tilde{O}(m^{3/4}n+mn^{2/3})$, where the $\tilde{O}$ notation suppresses polylogarithmic factors in $n$, the desired accuracy, and the appropriate condition number (i.e. the mixing time or restart probability). Our result improves upon the previous fastest running times for these problems; previous results either invoke a general purpose linear system solver on a $n\times n$ matrix with $m$ non-zero entries, or depend polynomially on the desired error or natural condition number associated with the problem (i.e. the mixing time or restart probability). For sparse graphs, we obtain a running time of $\tilde{O}(n^{7/4})$, breaking the $O(n^{2})$ barrier of the best running time one could hope to achieve using fast matrix multiplication. We achieve our result by providing a similar running time improvement for solving directed Laplacian systems, a natural directed or asymmetric analog of the well studied symmetric or undirected Laplacian systems. We show how to solve such systems in time $\tilde{O}(m^{3/4}n+mn^{2/3})$, and efficiently reduce a broad range of problems to solving $\tilde{O}(1)$ directed Laplacian systems on Eulerian graphs. We hope these results and our analysis open the door for further study into directed spectral graph theory.
  • We study the problem of estimating the value of sums of the form $S_p \triangleq \sum \binom{x_i}{p}$ when one has the ability to sample $x_i \geq 0$ with probability proportional to its magnitude. When $p=2$, this problem is equivalent to estimating the selectivity of a self-join query in database systems when one can sample rows randomly. We also study the special case when $\{x_i\}$ is the degree sequence of a graph, which corresponds to counting the number of $p$-stars in a graph when one has the ability to sample edges randomly. Our algorithm for a $(1 \pm \varepsilon)$-multiplicative approximation of $S_p$ has query and time complexities $\O(\frac{m \log \log n}{\epsilon^2 S_p^{1/p}})$. Here, $m=\sum x_i/2$ is the number of edges in the graph, or equivalently, half the number of records in the database table. Similarly, $n$ is the number of vertices in the graph and the number of unique values in the database table. We also provide tight lower bounds (up to polylogarithmic factors) in almost all cases, even when $\{x_i\}$ is a degree sequence and one is allowed to use the structure of the graph to try to get a better estimate. We are not aware of any prior lower bounds on the problem of join selectivity estimation. For the graph problem, prior work which assumed the ability to sample only \emph{vertices} uniformly gave algorithms with matching lower bounds [Gonen, Ron, and Shavitt. \textit{SIAM J. Comput.}, 25 (2011), pp. 1365-1411]. With the ability to sample edges randomly, we show that one can achieve faster algorithms for approximating the number of star subgraphs, bypassing the lower bounds in this prior work. For example, in the regime where $S_p\leq n$, and $p=2$, our upper bound is $\tilde{O}(n/S_p^{1/2})$, in contrast to their $\Omega(n/S_p^{1/3})$ lower bound when no random edge queries are available.
  • A Fibonacci heap is a deterministic data structure implementing a priority queue with optimal amortized operation costs. An unfortunate aspect of Fibonacci heaps is that they must maintain a "mark bit" which serves only to ensure efficiency of heap operations, not correctness. Karger proposed a simple randomized variant of Fibonacci heaps in which mark bits are replaced by coin flips. This variant still has expected amortized cost $O(1)$ for insert, decrease-key, and merge. Karger conjectured that this data structure has expected amortized cost $O(\log s)$ for delete-min, where $s$ is the number of heap operations. We give a tight analysis of Karger's randomized Fibonacci heaps, resolving Karger's conjecture. Specifically, we obtain matching upper and lower bounds of $\Theta(\log^2 s / \log \log s)$ for the runtime of delete-min. We also prove a tight lower bound of $\Omega(\sqrt{n})$ on delete-min in terms of the number of heap elements $n$. The request sequence used to prove this bound also solves an open problem of Fredman on whether cascading cuts are necessary. Finally, we give a simple additional modification to these heaps which yields a tight runtime $O(\log^2 n / \log \log n)$ for delete-min.