• We constrain the stellar population properties of a sample of 52 massive galaxies, with stellar mass $\log M_s/M_\odot>10.5$, over the redshift range 0.5<z<2 by use of observer-frame optical and near-infrared slitless spectra from Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 grisms. The deep exposures allow us to target individual spectra of massive galaxies to F160W=22.5AB. Our fitting approach uses a set of six base models adapted to the redshift and spectral resolution of each observation, and fits the weights of the base models via a MCMC method. The sample comprises a mixed distribution of quiescent (19) and star-forming galaxies (33). Using the cumulative distribution of stellar ages by mass, we define a "quenching timescale" that is found to correlate with stellar mass. The other population parameters, aside from metallicity, do not show such a strong correlation, although all display the characteristic segregation between quiescent and star-forming populations. Radial colour gradients within each galaxy are also explored, finding a wider scatter in the star-forming subsample, but no conclusive trend with respect to the population parameters. Environment is also studied, with at most a subtle effect towards older ages in high-density environments.
  • We improve the accuracy of photometric redshifts by including low-resolution spectral data from the G102 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope, which assists in redshift determination by further constraining the shape of the broadband Spectral Energy Disribution (SED) and identifying spectral features. The photometry used in the redshift fits includes near-IR photometry from FIGS+CANDELS, as well as optical data from ground-based surveys and HST ACS, and mid-IR data from Spitzer. We calculated the redshifts through the comparison of measured photometry with template galaxy models, using the EAZY photometric redshift code. For objects with F105W $< 26.5$ AB mag with a redshift range of $0 < z < 6$, we find a typical error of $\Delta z = 0.03 * (1+z)$ for the purely photometric redshifts; with the addition of FIGS spectra, these become $\Delta z = 0.02 * (1+z)$, an improvement of 50\%. Addition of grism data also reduces the outlier rate from 8\% to 7\% across all fields. With the more-accurate spectrophotometric redshifts (SPZs), we searched the FIGS fields for galaxy overdensities. We identified 24 overdensities across the 4 fields. The strongest overdensity, matching a spectroscopically identified cluster at $z=0.85$, has 28 potential member galaxies, of which 8 have previous spectroscopic confirmation, and features a corresponding X-ray signal. Another corresponding to a cluster at $z=1.84$ has 22 members, 18 of which are spectroscopically confirmed. Additionally, we find 4 overdensities that are detected at an equal or higher significance in at least one metric to the two confirmed clusters.
  • The Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS) is a deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3/IR (Wide Field Camera 3 Infrared) slitless spectroscopic survey of four deep fields. Two fields are located in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North (GOODS-N) area and two fields are located in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) area. One of the southern fields selected is the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. Each of these four fields were observed using the WFC3/G102 grism (0.8$\mu m$-1.15$\mu m$ continuous coverage) with a total exposure time of 40 orbits (~ 100 kilo-seconds) per field. This reaches a 3 sigma continuum depth of ~26 AB magnitudes and probes emission lines to $\approx 10^{-17}\ erg\ s^{-1} \ cm^{-2}$. This paper details the four FIGS fields and the overall observational strategy of the project. A detailed description of the Simulation Based Extraction (SBE) method used to extract and combine over 10000 spectra of over 2000 distinct sources brighter than m_F105W=26.5 mag is provided. High fidelity simulations of the observations is shown to significantly improve the background subtraction process, the spectral contamination estimates, and the final flux calibration. This allows for the combination of multiple spectra to produce a final high quality, deep, 1D-spectra for each object in the survey.