• Jacob L. Bean, Kevin B. Stevenson, Natalie M. Batalha, Zachory Berta-Thompson, Laura Kreidberg, Nicolas Crouzet, Björn Benneke, Michael R. Line, David K. Sing, Hannah R. Wakeford, Heather A. Knutson, Eliza M.-R. Kempton, Jean-Michel Désert, Ian Crossfield, Natasha E. Batalha, Julien de Wit, Vivien Parmentier, Joseph Harrington, Julianne I. Moses, Mercedes Lopez-Morales, Munazza K. Alam, Jasmina Blecic, Giovanni Bruno, Aarynn L. Carter, John W. Chapman, Leen Decin, Diana Dragomir, Thomas M. Evans, Jonathan J. Fortney, Jonathan D. Fraine, Peter Gao, Antonio García Muñoz, Neale P. Gibson, Jayesh M. Goyal, Kevin Heng, Renyu Hu, Sarah Kendrew, Brian M. Kilpatrick, Jessica Krick, Pierre-Olivier Lagage, Monika Lendl, Tom Louden, Nikku Madhusudhan, Avi M. Mandell, Megan Mansfield, Erin M. May, Giuseppe Morello, Caroline V. Morley, Nikolay Nikolov, Seth Redfield, Jessica E. Roberts, Everett Schlawin, Jessica J. Spake, Kamen O. Todorov, Angelos Tsiaras, Olivia Venot, William C. Waalkes, Peter J. Wheatley, Robert T. Zellem, Daniel Angerhausen, David Barrado, Ludmila Carone, Sarah L. Casewell, Patricio E. Cubillos, Mario Damiano, Miguel de Val-Borro, Benjamin Drummond, Billy Edwards, Michael Endl, Nestor Espinoza, Kevin France, John E. Gizis, Thomas P. Greene, Thomas K. Henning, Yucian Hong, James G. Ingalls, Nicolas Iro, Patrick G.J. Irwin, Tiffany Kataria, Fred Lahuis, Jérémy Leconte, Jorge Lillo-Box, Stefan Lines, Luigi Mancini, Franck Marchis, Nathan Mayne, Enric Palle, Gaël Roudier, Evgenya L. Shkolnik, John Southworth, Johanna Teske, Giovanna Tinetti, Pascal Tremblin, Gregory S. Tucker, Roy vanBoekel, Ingo P. Waldmann, Ian C. Weaver, Tiziano Zingales
    March 13, 2018 astro-ph.EP
    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) presents the opportunity to transform our understanding of planets and the origins of life by revealing the atmospheric compositions, structures, and dynamics of transiting exoplanets in unprecedented detail. However, the high-precision, time-series observations required for such investigations have unique technical challenges, and prior experience with other facilities indicates that there will be a steep learning curve when JWST becomes operational. In this paper we describe the science objectives and detailed plans of the Transiting Exoplanet Community Early Release Science (ERS) Program, which is a recently approved program for JWST observations early in Cycle 1. The goal of this project, for which the obtained data will have no exclusive access period, is to accelerate the acquisition and diffusion of technical expertise for transiting exoplanet observations with JWST, while also providing a compelling set of representative datasets that will enable immediate scientific breakthroughs. The Transiting Exoplanet Community ERS Program will exercise the time-series modes of all four JWST instruments that have been identified as the consensus highest priorities, observe the full suite of transiting planet characterization geometries (transits, eclipses, and phase curves), and target planets with host stars that span an illustrative range of brightnesses. The observations in this program were defined through an inclusive and transparent process that had participation from JWST instrument experts and international leaders in transiting exoplanet studies. Community engagement in the project will be centered on a two-phase Data Challenge that culminates with the delivery of planetary spectra, time-series instrument performance reports, and open-source data analysis toolkits in time to inform the agenda for Cycle 2 of the JWST mission.
  • We report the discovery of Qatar-3b, Qatar-4b, and Qatar-5b, three new transiting planets identified by the Qatar Exoplanet Survey (QES). The three planets belong to the hot Jupiter family, with orbital periods of $P_{Q3b}$=2.50792 days, $P_{Q4b}$=1.80539 days, and $P_{Q5b}$=2.87923 days. Follow-up spectroscopic observations reveal the masses of the planets to be $M_{Q3b}$=4.31$\pm0.47$ $M_{\rm J}$, $M_{Q4b}$=6.10$ \pm0.54$ $M_{\rm J}$, and $M_{Q5b}$ = 4.32$ \pm0.18$ $M_{\rm J}$, while model fits to the transit light curves yield radii of $R_{Q3b}$ = 1.096$ \pm0.14$ $R_{\rm J}$, $R_{Q4b}$ = 1.135$ \pm0.11$ $R_{\rm J}$, and $R_{Q5b}$ = 1.107$ \pm0.064$ $R_{\rm J}$. The host stars are low-mass main sequence stars with masses and radii $M_{Q3}$ = 1.145$ \pm0.064$ $M_{\odot}$, $M_{Q4}$ = 0.896$ \pm0.048$ $M_{\odot}$, $M_{Q5}$ = 1.128$ \pm0.056$ $M_{\odot}$ and $R_{Q3}$ = 1.272$ \pm0.14$ $R_{\odot}$, $R_{Q4}$ = 0.849$\pm0.063$ $R_{\odot}$ and $R_{Q5}$ = 1.076$\pm0.051$ $R_{\odot}$ for Qatar-3, 4 and 5 respectively. The V magnitudes of the three host stars are $V_{Q3}$=12.88, $V_{Q4}$=13.60, and $V_{Q5}$=12.82. All three new planets can be classified as heavy hot Jupiters (M > 4 $M_{J}$).
  • Detecting the atmospheres of low-mass low-temperature exoplanets is a high-priority goal on the path to ultimately detect biosignatures in the atmospheres of habitable exoplanets. High-precision HST observations of several super-Earths with equilibrium temperatures below 1000K have to date all resulted in featureless transmission spectra, which have been suggested to be due to high-altitude clouds. We report the detection of an atmospheric feature in the atmosphere of a 1.6 Mearth transiting exoplanet, GJ 1132b, with an equilibrium temperature of ~600K and orbiting a nearby M dwarf. We present observations of nine transits of the planet obtained simultaneously in the griz and JHK passbands. We find an average radius of 1.43 +/- 0.16 Rearth for the planet, averaged over all the passbands, and a radius of 0.255 +/- 0.023 Rsun for the star, both of which are significantly greater than previously found. The planet radius can be decomposed into a "surface radius" at ~1.375 Rearth overlaid by atmospheric features which increase the observed radius in the z and K bands. The z-band radius is 4sigma higher than the continuum, suggesting a strong detection of an atmosphere. We deploy a suite of tests to verify the reliability of the transmission spectrum, which are greatly helped by the existence of repeat observations. The large z-band transit depth indicates strong opacity from H2O and/or CH4 or a hitherto unconsidered opacity. A surface radius of 1.375 +/- 0.16 Rearth allows for a wide range of interior compositions ranging from a nearly Earth-like rocky interior, with ~70% silicate and ~30% Fe, to a substantially H2O-rich water world.
  • We report the detection of two new systems containing transiting planets. Both were identified by WASP as worthy transiting planet candidates. Radial-velocity observations quickly verified that the photometric signals were indeed produced by two transiting hot Jupiters. Our observations also show the presence of additional Doppler signals. In addition to short-period hot Jupiters, we find that the WASP-53 and WASP-81 systems also host brown dwarfs, on fairly eccentric orbits with semi-major axes of a few astronomical units. WASP-53c is over 16 $M_{\rm Jup} \sin i_{\rm c}$ and WASP-81c is 57 $M_{\rm Jup} \sin i_{\rm c}$. The presence of these tight, massive companions restricts theories of how the inner planets were assembled. We propose two alternative interpretations: a formation of the hot Jupiters within the snow line, or the late dynamical arrival of the brown dwarfs after disc-dispersal. We also attempted to measure the Rossiter--McLaughlin effect for both hot Jupiters. In the case of WASP-81b we fail to detect a signal. For WASP-53b we find that the planet is aligned with respect to the stellar spin axis. In addition we explore the prospect of transit timing variations, and of using Gaia's astrometry to measure the true masses of both brown dwarfs and also their relative inclination with respect to the inner transiting hot Jupiters.
  • We announce the discovery that WASP-20 is a binary stellar system, consisting of two components separated by $0.2578\pm0.0007^{\prime\prime}$ on the sky, with a flux ratio of $0.4639\pm 0.0015$ in the $K$-band. It has previously been assumed that the system consists of a single F9 V star, with photometric and radial velocity signals consistent with a low-density transiting giant planet. With a projected separation of approximately $60$ au between the two components, the detected planetary signals almost certainly originate from the brighter of the two stars. We reanalyse previous observations allowing for two scenarios, `planet transits A' and `planet transits B', finding that both cases remain consistent with a transiting gas giant. However, we rule out the `planet transits B' scenario because the observed transit duration requires star B to be significantly evolved, and therefore have an age much greater than star A. We outline further observations which can be used to confirm this finding. Our preferred `planet transits A' scenario results in the measured mass and radius of the planet increasing by 4$\sigma$ and 1$\sigma$, respectively.
  • Given the potential of ensemble asteroseismology for understanding fundamental properties of large numbers of stars, it is critical to determine the accuracy of the scaling relations on which these measurements are based. From several powerful validation techniques, all indications so far show that stellar radius estimates from the asteroseismic scaling relations are accurate to within a few percent. Eclipsing binary systems hosting at least one star with detectable solar-like oscillations constitute the ideal test objects for validating asteroseismic radius and mass inferences. By combining radial-velocity measurements and photometric time series of eclipses, it is possible to determine the masses and radii of each component of a double-lined spectroscopic binary. We report the results of a four-year radial-velocity survey performed with the \'echelle spectrometer of the Astrophysical Research Consortium's 3.5-m telescope and the APOGEE spectrometer at Apache Point Observatory. We compare the masses and radii of 10 red giants obtained by combining radial velocities and eclipse photometry with the estimates from the asteroseismic scaling relations. We find that the asteroseismic scaling relations overestimate red-giant radii by about 5% on average and masses by about 15% for stars at various stages of red-giant evolution. Systematic overestimation of mass leads to underestimation of stellar age, which can have important implications for ensemble asteroseismology used for Galactic studies. As part of a second objective, where asteroseismology is used for understanding binary systems, we confirm that oscillations of red giants in close binaries can be suppressed enough to be undetectable, an hypothesis that was proposed in a previous work.
  • When a planet passes in front of a starspot during a transit of its host star, it causes a small upward blip in the light curve. Modelling the transit with the starspot allows the size, brightness and position of the spot to be measured. If the same spot can be observed in two different transits, it is possible to track the motion of the spot due to the rotation of the star. The rotation period and velocity of the star (Prot and Vsini) and the sky-projected orbital obliquity of the system (lambda) can then be determined. If one has three or more observations of the same spot, the true orbital obliquity (psi) can be measured. We are performing this analysis for a number of cool stars orbited by transiting planets. We present our results so far and compile a catalogue of lambda and psi measurements from spot crossing events. The method is particularly useful for cool stars, and is therefore complementary to studies of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, which perform better on hotter and faster-rotating stars.
  • The planet in the WASP-103 system is an excellent candidate for transmission spectroscopy because of its large radius and high temperature. Application of this technique found a variation of radius with wavelength which was far too strong to be explained by scattering processes in the planetary atmosphere. A faint nearby star was subsequently detected, whose contamination of the transit light curves might explain this anomaly. We present a reanalysis of published data in order to characterise the faint star and assess its effect on the measured transmission spectrum. The faint star has a mass of 0.72 +/- 0.08 Msun and is almost certainly gravitationally bound to the planetary system. We find that its effect on the measured physical properties of the planet and host star is small, amounting to a planetary radius larger by 0.6 sigma and planetary density smaller by 0.8 sigma. Its influence on the measured transmission spectrum is much greater: the spectrum now has a minimum around 760 nm and opacity rises to both bluer and redder wavelengths. It is a poor match to theoretical spectra and the spectral slope remains too strong for Rayleigh scattering. The existence of the faint nearby star cannot therefore explain the measured spectral properties of this hot and inflated planet. We advocate further observations of the system, both with high spatial resolution in order to improve the measured properties of the faint star, and with higher spectral resolution to confirm the anomalous transmission spectrum of the planet.
  • We report nine years of optical spectroscopy of the metal-polluted white dwarf SDSS J104341.53+085558.2, which presents morphological variations of the line profiles of the 8600 \AA\ Ca II triplet emission from the gaseous component of its debris disc. Similar changes in the shape of the Ca II triplet have also been observed in two other systems that host a gaseous disc, and are likely related to the same mechanism. We report the Mg, Si, and Ca abundances of the debris detected in the photosphere of SDSS J1043+0855, place upper limits on O and Fe, and derive an accretion rate of (2.5 - 12)x$10^8$ g/s, consistent with those found in other systems with detected debris discs. The Mg/Si ratio and the upper limit on the Fe/Si ratio of the accreted material broadly agree with those found for the crust of the Earth. We also review the range of variability observed among white dwarfs with planetary debris discs.
  • Brown dwarfs and giant planets orbiting close to a host star are subjected to significant irradiation that can modify the properties of their atmospheres. In order to test the atmospheric models that are used to describe these systems, it is necessary to obtain accurate observational estimates of their physical properties (masses, radii, temperatures, albedos). Interacting compact binary systems provide a natural laboratory for studying strongly irradiated sub-stellar objects. As the mass-losing secondary in these systems makes a critical, but poorly understood transition from the stellar to the sub-stellar regime, it is also strongly irradiated by the compact accretor. In fact, the internal and external energy fluxes are both expected to be comparable in these objects, providing access to an unexplored irradiation regime. However, the atmospheric properties of such donors have so far remained largely unknown. Here, we report the direct spectroscopic detection and characterisation of an irradiated sub-stellar donor in an accreting white dwarf binary system. Our near-infrared observations allow us to determine a model-independent mass estimate for the donor of $M_2=0.055\pm0.008M_{\odot}$ and an average spectral type of ${\rm L1}\pm{\rm1}$, supporting both theoretical predictions and model-dependent observational constraints. Our time-resolved data also allow us to estimate the average irradiation-induced temperature difference between the day and night sides on the sub-stellar donor, $\Delta{\rm T}\simeq57$~K, and the maximum difference between the hottest and coolest parts of its surface, of $\Delta{\rm T}_{max}\simeq200$~K. The observations are well described by a simple geometric reprocessing model with a bolometric (Bond) albedo of $A_B<0.54$ at 2-$\sigma$ confidence level, consistent with high reprocessing efficiency, but poor lateral heat redistribution in the donor's atmosphere.
  • Since 2008 we have run an observational program to accurately measure the characteristics of known exoplanet systems hosting close-in transiting giant planets, i.e. hot Jupiters. Our study is based on high-quality photometric follow-up observations of transit events with an array of medium-class telescopes, which are located in both the northern and the southern hemispheres. A high photometric precision is achieved through the telescope-defocussing technique. The data are then reduced and analysed in a homogeneous way for estimating the orbital and physical parameters of both the planets and their parent stars. We also make use of multi-band imaging cameras for probing planetary atmospheres via the transmission-photometry technique. In some cases we adopt a two-site observational strategy for collecting simultaneous light curves of individual transits, which is the only completely reliable method for truly distinguishing a real astrophysical signal from systematic noise. In this contribution we review the main results of our program.
  • We present 13 high-precision and four additional light curves of four bright southern-hemisphere transiting planetary systems: WASP-22, WASP-41, WASP-42 and WASP-55. In the cases of WASP-42 and WASP-55, these are the first follow-up observations since their discovery papers. We present refined measurements of the physical properties and orbital ephemerides of all four systems. No indications of transit timing variations were seen. All four planets have radii inflated above those expected from theoretical models of gas-giant planets; WASP-55b is the most discrepant with a mass of 0.63 Mjup and a radius of 1.34 Rjup. WASP-41 shows brightness anomalies during transit due to the planet occulting spots on the stellar surface. Two anomalies observed 3.1 d apart are very likely due to the same spot. We measure its change in position and determine a rotation period for the host star of 18.6 +/- 1.5 d, in good agreement with a published measurement from spot-induced brightness modulation, and a sky-projected orbital obliquity of lambda = 6 +/- 11 degrees. We conclude with a compilation of obliquity measurements from spot-tracking analyses and a discussion of this technique in the study of the orbital configurations of hot Jupiters.
  • The Kepler Mission has provided unprecedented, nearly continuous photometric data of $\sim$200,000 objects in the $\sim$105 deg$^{2}$ field of view from the beginning of science operations in May of 2009 until the loss of the second reaction wheel in May of 2013. The Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog contains information including but not limited to ephemerides, stellar parameters and analytical approximation fits for every known eclipsing binary system in the Kepler Field of View. Using Target Pixel level data collected from Kepler in conjunction with the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, we identify false positives among eclipsing binaries, i.e. targets that are not eclipsing binaries themselves, but are instead contaminated by eclipsing binary sources nearby on the sky and show eclipsing binary signatures in their light curves. We present methods for identifying these false positives and for extracting new light curves for the true source of the observed binary signal. For each source, we extract three separate light curves for each quarter of available data by optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio, the relative percent eclipse depth and the flux eclipse depth. We present 289 new eclipsing binaries in the Kepler Field of View that were not targets for observation, and these have been added to the Catalog. An online version of this Catalog with downloadable content and visualization tools is maintained at http://keplerEBs.villanova.edu.
  • The primary Kepler Mission provided nearly continuous monitoring of ~200,000 objects with unprecedented photometric precision. We present the final catalog of eclipsing binary systems within the 105 square degree Kepler field of view. This release incorporates the full extent of the data from the primary mission (Q0-Q17 Data Release). As a result, new systems have been added, additional false positives have been removed, ephemerides and principal parameters have been recomputed, classifications have been revised to rely on analytical models, and eclipse timing variations have been computed for each system. We identify several classes of systems including those that exhibit tertiary eclipse events, systems that show clear evidence of additional bodies, heartbeat systems, systems with changing eclipse depths, and systems exhibiting only one eclipse event over the duration of the mission. We have updated the period and galactic latitude distribution diagrams and included a catalog completeness evaluation. The total number of identified eclipsing and ellipsoidal binary systems in the Kepler field of view has increased to 2878, 1.3% of all observed Kepler targets. An online version of this catalog with downloadable content and visualization tools is maintained at http://keplerEBs.villanova.edu.
  • Debris discs which orbit white dwarfs are signatures of remnant planetary systems. We present twelve years of optical spectroscopy of the metal-polluted white dwarf SDSS J1228+1040, which shows a steady variation in the morphology of the 8600 {\AA} Ca II triplet line profiles from the gaseous component of its debris disc. We identify additional emission lines of O I, Mg I, Mg II, Fe II and Ca II in the deep co-added spectra. These emission features (including Ca H & K) exhibit a wide range in strength and morphology with respect to each other and to the Ca II triplet, indicating different intensity distributions of these ionic species within the disc. Using Doppler tomography we show that the evolution of the Ca II triplet profile can be interpreted as the precession of a fixed emission pattern with a period in the range 24-30 years. The Ca II line profiles vary on time-scales that are broadly consistent with general relativistic precession of the debris disc.
  • For all exoplanet candidates, the reliability of a claimed detection needs to be assessed through a careful study of systematic errors in the data to minimize the false positives rate. We present a method to investigate such systematics in microlensing datasets using the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0446 as a case study. The event was observed from multiple sites around the world and its high magnification (A_{max} \sim 3000) allowed us to investigate the effects of terrestrial and annual parallax. Real-time modeling of the event while it was still ongoing suggested the presence of an extremely low-mass companion (\sim 3M_\oplus ) to the lensing star, leading to substantial follow-up coverage of the light curve. We test and compare different models for the light curve and conclude that the data do not favour the planetary interpretation when systematic errors are taken into account.
  • Transits in the WASP-57 planetary system have been found to occur half an hour earlier than expected. We present ten transit light curves from amateur telescopes, on which this discovery was based, thirteen transit light curves from professional facilities which confirm and refine this finding, and high-resolution imaging which show no evidence for nearby companions. We use these data to determine a new and precise orbital ephemeris, and measure the physical properties of the system. Our revised orbital period is 4.5s shorter than found from the discovery data alone, which explains the early occurrence of the transits. We also find both the star and planet to be larger and less massive than previously thought. The measured mass and radius of the planet are now consistent with theoretical models of gas giants containing no heavy-element core, as expected for the sub-solar metallicity of the host star. Two transits were observed simultaneously in four passbands. We use the resulting light curves to measure the planet's radius as a function of wavelength, finding that our data are sufficient in principle but not in practise to constrain its atmospheric properties. We conclude with a discussion of the current and future status of transmission photometry studies for probing the atmospheres of gas-giant transiting planets.
  • The study of eclipsing binaries is our primary source of measured properties of normal stars, achieved through analysis of light and radial velocity curves of eclipsing systems. The study of oscillations and pulsations is increasingly vital for determining the properties of single stars, and investigating the physical phenomena active in their interiors. Combining the two methods holds the promise of establishing stringent tests of stellar evolutionary theory, and of calibrating model-dependent asteroseismology with empirically measured stellar properties. I review recent advances and outline future work.
  • We present updates to \textsc{prism}, a photometric transit-starspot model, and \textsc{gemc}, a hybrid optimisation code combining MCMC and a genetic algorithm. We then present high-precision photometry of four transits in the WASP-6 planetary system, two of which contain a starspot anomaly. All four transits were modelled using \textsc{prism} and \textsc{gemc}, and the physical properties of the system calculated. We find the mass and radius of the host star to be $0.836\pm 0.063\,{\rm M}_\odot$ and $0.864\pm0.024\,{\rm R}_\odot$, respectively. For the planet we find a mass of $0.485\pm 0.027\,{\rm M}_{\rm Jup}$, a radius of $1.230\pm0.035\,{\rm R}_{\rm Jup}$ and a density of $0.244\pm0.014\,\rho_{\rm Jup}$. These values are consistent with those found in the literature. In the likely hypothesis that the two spot anomalies are caused by the same starspot or starspot complex, we measure the stars rotation period and velocity to be $23.80 \pm 0.15$\,d and $1.78 \pm 0.20$\,km\,s$^{-1}$, respectively, at a co-latitude of 75.8$^\circ$. We find that the sky-projected angle between the stellar spin axis and the planetary orbital axis is $\lambda = 7.2^{\circ} \pm 3.7^{\circ}$, indicating axial alignment. Our results are consistent with and more precise than published spectroscopic measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. These results suggest that WASP-6\,b formed at a much greater distance from its host star and suffered orbital decay through tidal interactions with the protoplanetary disc.
  • We report follow-up spectroscopy of 29 cataclysmic variables from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), 22 of which were discovered by SDSS and seven other previously known systems that were recovered in SDSS. The periods for 16 of these objects were included in the tabulation by Gaensicke et al. (2009). While most of the systems have periods less than 2 hours, only one has a period in the 80-86 minute 'spike' found by Gaensicke et al. (2009), and 11 have periods longer than 3 hours, indicating that the present sample is skewed toward longer-period, higher-luminosity objects. Seven of the objects have spectra resembling dwarf novae, but have apparently never been observed in outburst, suggesting that many cataclysmics with relatively low variability amplitude remain to be discovered. Some of the objects are notable. SDSS J07568+0858 and SDSS J08129+1911 were previously known to have deep eclipses; in addition to spectroscopy, we use archival data from the CRTTS to refine their periods. We give a parallax-based distance of 195 (+54, -39) pc for LV Cnc (SDSS J09197+0857), which at Porb = 81 m has the shortest orbital period in our sample. SDSS J08091+3814 shows both the spectroscopic phase offset and phase-dependent absorption found in SW Sextantis stars. The average spectra of SDSS J08055+0720 and SDSS J16191+1351 show contributions from K-type secondaries, and SDSS J080440+0239 shows a contribution from an early M star. We use these to constrain the distances. SDSS J09459+2922 has characteristics typical of a magnetic system. SDSS11324+6249 may be a novalike variable, and if so, its orbital period (99 min) is unusually short for that subclass.
  • We report the first disclosure of the planetary nature of Kepler-432 b (aka Kepler object of interest KOI-1299.01). We accurately constrained its mass and eccentricity by high-precision radial velocity measurements obtained with the CAFE spectrograph at the CAHA 2.2-m telescope. By simultaneously fitting these new data and Kepler photometry, we found that Kepler-432 b is a dense transiting exoplanet with a mass of Mp = 4.87 +/- 0.48 MJup and radius of Rp = 1.120 +/- 0.036 RJup. The planet revolves every 52.5 d around a K giant star that ascends the red giant branch, and it moves on a highly eccentric orbit with e = 0.535 +/- 0.030. By analysing two NIR high-resolution images, we found that a star is located at 1.1 from Kepler-432, but it is too faint to cause significant effects on the transit depth. Together with Kepler-56 and Kepler-91, Kepler-432 occupies an almost-desert region of parameter space, which is important for constraining the evolutionary processes of planetary systems.
  • The study of transiting extrasolar planets is only 15 years old, but has matured into a rich area of research. I review the observational aspects of this work, concentrating on the discovery of transits, the characterisation of planets from photometry and spectroscopy, the Homogeneous Studies project, starspots, orbital obliquities, and the atmospheric properties of the known planets. I begin with historical context and conclude with a glance to a future of TESS, CHEOPS, Gaia and PLATO.
  • We present 17 transit light curves of the ultra-short period planetary system WASP-103, a strong candidate for the detection of tidally-induced orbital decay. We use these to establish a high-precision reference epoch for transit timing studies. The time of the reference transit midpoint is now measured to an accuracy of 4.8s, versus 67.4s in the discovery paper, aiding future searches for orbital decay. With the help of published spectroscopic measurements and theoretical stellar models, we determine the physical properties of the system to high precision and present a detailed error budget for these calculations. The planet has a Roche lobe filling factor of 0.58, leading to a significant asphericity; we correct its measured mass and mean density for this phenomenon. A high-resolution Lucky Imaging observation shows no evidence for faint stars close enough to contaminate the point spread function of WASP-103. Our data were obtained in the Bessell $RI$ and the SDSS $griz$ passbands and yield a larger planet radius at bluer optical wavelengths, to a confidence level of 7.3 sigma. Interpreting this as an effect of Rayleigh scattering in the planetary atmosphere leads to a measurement of the planetary mass which is too small by a factor of five, implying that Rayleigh scattering is not the main cause of the variation of radius with wavelength.
  • We report the discovery of eclipses and the first orbital period measurements for four cataclysmic variables, plus the first orbital period measurements for one known eclipsing and two magnetic systems. SDSS J093537.46+161950.8 exhibits 1-mag deep eclipses with a period of 92.245 min. SDSS J105754.25+275947.5 has short and deep eclipses and an orbital period of 90.44 min. Its light curve has no trace of a bright spot and its spectrum is dominated by the white dwarf component, suggesting a low mass accretion rate and a very low-mass and cool secondary star. CSS J132536+210037 shows 1-mag deep eclipses each separated by 89.821 min. SDSS J075653.11+085831.8 shows 2-mag deep eclipses on a period of 197.154 min. CSS J112634-100210 is an eclipsing dwarf nova identified in the Catalina Real Time Transit Survey, for which we measure a period of 111.523 min. SDSS J092122.84+203857.1 is a magnetic system with an orbital period of 84.240 min; its light curve is a textbook example of cyclotron beaming. A period of 158.72 min is found for the faint magnetic system SDSS J132411.57+032050.4, whose orbital light variations are reminiscent of AM Her. Improved orbital period measurements are also given for three known SDSS cataclysmic variables. We investigate the orbital period distribution and fraction of eclipsing systems within the SDSS sample and for all cataclysmic variables with a known orbital period, with the finding that the fraction of known CVs which are eclipsing is not strongly dependent on the orbital period.
  • The CoRoT and Kepler satellites were the first space platforms designed to perform high-precision photometry for a large number of stars. Multiple systems display a wide variety of photometric variability, making them natural benefactors of these missions. I review the work arising from CoRoT and Kepler observations of multiple systems, with particular emphasis on eclipsing binaries containing giant stars, pulsators, triple eclipses and/or low-mass stars. Many more results remain untapped in the data archives of these missions, and the future holds the promise of K2, TESS and PLATO.