• We find the conditions for the existence of fermionic zero modes of the fundamental representation in the background of a Kaluza-Klein (KK) monopole. We show that while there is no zero mode without a real mass, a normalizable zero mode appears once the real mass is sufficiently large. This provides an elegant explanation for the known decoupling of KK monopole effects in supersymmetric theories when a large real mass term is added. We also present an application where the correct counting of KK zero modes plays an essential role in understanding the non-perturbative effects determining the low-energy dynamics.
  • Observations of gravitational waves from neutron star mergers open up novel directions for exploring fundamental physics: they offer the first access to the structure of objects with a non-negligible contribution from vacuum energy to their total mass. The presence of such vacuum energy in the inner cores of neutron stars occurs in new QCD phases at large densities, with the vacuum energy appearing in the equation of state for a new phase. This in turn leads to a change in the internal structure of neutron stars and influences their tidal deformabilities which are measurable in the chirp signals of merging neutron stars. By considering three commonly used neutron star models we show that for large chirp masses the effect of vacuum energy on the tidal deformabilities can be sizable. Measurements of this sort have the potential to provide a first test of the gravitational properties of vacuum energy independent from the acceleration of the Universe, and to determine the size of QCD contributions to the vacuum energy.
  • One often hears that the strong CP problem is {\em the} one problem which cannot be solved by anthropic reasoning. We argue that this is not so. Due to nonperturbative dynamics, states with a different CP violating paramenter $\theta$ acquire different vacuum energies after the QCD phase transition. These add to the total variation of the cosmological constant in the putative landscape of Universes. An interesting possibility arises when the cosmological constant is mostly cancelled by the membrane nucleation mechanism. If the step size in the resulting discretuum of cosmological constants, $\Delta \Lambda$, is in the interval $({\rm meV})^4 < \Delta \Lambda < (100 \, {\rm MeV})^4$, the cancellation of vacuum energy can be assisted by the scanning of $\theta$. For $({\rm meV})^4 < \Delta \Lambda < ({\rm keV})^4$ this yields $\theta < 10^{-10}$, meeting the observational limits. This scenario opens up 24 orders of magnitude of acceptable parameter space for $\Delta \Lambda$ compared membrane nucleation acting alone. In such a Universe one does not need a light axion to solve the strong CP problem.
  • The appearance of the light Higgs boson at the LHC is difficult to explain, particularly in light of naturalness arguments in quantum field theory. However light scalars can appear in condensed matter systems when parameters (like the amount of doping) are tuned to a critical point. At zero temperature these quantum critical points are directly analogous to the finely tuned standard model. In this paper we explore a class of models with a Higgs near a quantum critical point that exhibits non-mean-field behavior. We discuss the parametrization of the effects of a Higgs emerging from such a critical point in terms of form factors, and present two simple realistic scenarios based on either generalized free fields or a 5D dual in AdS space. For both of these models we consider the processes $gg\to ZZ$ and $gg\to hh$, which can be used to gain information about the Higgs scaling dimension and IR transition scale from the experimental data.
  • We explore a new class of natural models which ensure the one-loop divergences in the Higgs mass are cancelled. The top-partners that cancel the top loop are new gauge bosons, and the symmetry relation that ensures the cancellation arises at an infrared fixed point. Such a cancellation mechanism can, a la Little Higgs models, push the scale of new physics that completely solves the hierarchy problem up to 5-10 TeV. When embedded in a supersymmetric model, the stop and gaugino masses provide the cutoffs for the loops, and the mechanism ensures a cancellation between the stop and gaugino mass dependence of the Higgs mass parameter.
  • The production mechanism of a 750 GeV diphoton resonance, either via gluon or photon fusion, can be probed by studying kinematic observables in the diphoton events. We perform a detector study of the two production modes of a hypothetical scalar or tensor diphoton resonance in order to characterize the features of the two scenarios. The nature of the resonance production can be determined from the jet multiplicity, the jet and diphoton rapidities, the rate of central pseudorapidity gaps, or the possible detection of forward protons from elastic photoproduction for events in the signal region. Kinematic distributions for both signals and expected irreducible diphoton background events are provided for comparison along with a study of observables useful for distinguishing the two scenarios at an integrated luminosity of 20 fb$^{-1}$. We find that decay photons from a 750 GeV scalar resonance have a preference for acceptance in the central detector barrel, while background events are more likely to give accepted photons in the detector end caps. This disfavors the interpretation of the large number of excess events found by the the Run-2 CMS diphoton search with one photon detected in the end cap as a wide spin-0 resonance signal. However, one expects more end cap photons in the case of spin-2 resonance.
  • We consider the phenomenology of a resonance that couples to photons but not gluons, and estimate its production rate at the LHC from photon-photon fusion in elastic pp scattering using the effective photon and narrow width approximations. The rate is sensitive only to the mass, the spin, the total width of the resonance, and its branching fraction to photons. Production cross sections of 5-10 fb at 13 TeV can be easily accommodated for a 750 GeV resonance with partial photon width of 15 GeV. This provides the minimal explanation of the reported diphoton anomaly in the early LHC Run II data.
  • We review strongly coupled and extra dimensional models of electroweak symmetry breaking. Models examined include warped extra dimensions, bulk Higgs, "little" Higgs, dilaton Higgs, composite Higgs, twin Higgs, quantum critical Higgs, and "fat" SUSY Higgs. We also discuss current bounds and future LHC searches for this class of models.
  • It is widely thought that increasing bounds on the gluino mass, which feeds down to the stop mass through renormalization group running, are making a light stop increasingly unlikely. Here we present a counter-example. We examine the case of the Minimal Composite Supersymmetric Standard Model which has a light composite stop. The large anomalous dimension of the stop from strong dynamics pushes the stop mass toward a quasi-fixed point in the infrared, which is smaller than standard estimates by a factor of a large logarithm. The gluino can be about three times heavier than the stop, which is comparable to hierarchy achieved with supersoft Dirac gluino masses. Thus, in this class of models, a heavy gluino is not necessarily indicative of a heavy stop.
  • We provide an example of a 4D theory that exhibits the Contino-Pomarol-Rattazzi mechanism, where breaking conformal symmetry by an almost marginal operator leads to a light pseudo-Goldstone boson, the dilaton, and a parametrically suppressed contribution to vacuum energy. We consider SUSY QCD at the edge of the conformal window and break conformal symmetry by weakly gauging a subgroup of the flavor symmetry. Using Seiberg duality we show that for a range of parameters the singlet meson in the dual theory reaches the unitarity bound, however, this theory does not have a stable vacuum. We stabilize the vacuum with soft breaking terms, compute the mass of the dilaton, and determine the range of parameters where the leading contribution to the dilaton mass is from the almost marginal coupling.
  • We examine interacting Abelian theories at low energies and show that holomorphically normalized photon helicity amplitudes transform into dual amplitudes under SL(2,Z) as modular forms with weights that depend on the number of positive and negative helicity photons and on the number of internal photon lines. Moreover, canonically normalized helicity amplitudes transform by a phase, so that even though the amplitudes are not duality invariant, their squares are duality invariant. We explicitly verify the duality transformation at one loop by comparing the amplitudes in the case of an electron and the dyon that is its SL(2,Z) image, and extend the invariance of squared amplitudes order by order in perturbation theory. We demonstrate that S-duality is property of all low-energy effective Abelian theories with electric and/or magnetic charges and see how the duality generically breaks down at high energies.
  • Vacuum energy changes during cosmological phase transitions and becomes relatively important at epochs just before phase transitions. For a viable cosmology the vacuum energy just after a phase transition must be set by the critical temperature of the next phase transition, which exposes the cosmological constant problem from a different angle. Here we propose to experimentally test the properties of vacuum energy under circumstances different from our current vacuum. One promising avenue is to consider the effect of high density phases of QCD in neutron stars. Such phases have different vacuum expectation values and a different vacuum energy from the normal phase, which can contribute an order one fraction to the mass of neutron stars. Precise observations of the mass of neutron stars can potentially yield information about the gravitational properties of vacuum energy, which can significantly affect their mass-radius relation. A more direct test of cosmic evolution of vacuum energy could be inferred from a precise observation of the primordial gravitational wave spectrum at frequencies corresponding to phase transitions. While traditional cosmology predicts steps in the spectrum determined by the number of degrees of freedom both for the QCD and electroweak phase transitions, an adjustment mechanism for vacuum energy could significantly change this. In addition, there might be other phase transitions where the effect of vacuum energy could show up as a peak in the spectrum.
  • We investigate the IR dynamics of N=2 SUSY gauge theories in 3D with antisymmetric matter. The presence of the antisymmetric fields leads to further splitting of the Coulomb branch. Counting zero modes in the instanton background suggests that more than a single direction along the Coulomb branch may remain unlifted. We examine the case of SU(4) with one or two antisymmetric fields and various flavors in detail. Using the results for the corresponding 4D theories, we find the IR dynamics of the 3D cases via compactification and a real mass deformation. We find that for the s-confining case with two antisymmetric fields, a second unlifted Coulomb branch direction indeed appears in the low-energy dynamics. We present several non-trivial consistency checks to establish the validity of these results. We also comment on the expected structure of general s-confining theories in 3D, which might involve several unlifted Coulomb branch directions.
  • We construct a model of inflation based on a low-energy effective theory of spontaneously broken global scale invariance. This provides a shift symmetry that protects the inflaton potential from quantum corrections. Since the underlying scale invariance is non-compact, arbitrarily large inflaton field displacements are readily allowed in the low-energy effective theory. A weak breaking of scale invariance by almost marginal operators provides a non-trivial inflaton minimum, which sets and stabilizes the final low-energy value of the Planck scale. The underlying scale invariance ensures that the slow-roll approximation remains valid over large inflaton displacements, and yields a scale invariant spectrum of perturbations as required by the CMB observations.
  • We examine the effects of photon-axion mixing on the CMB. We show that if there are very underdense regions between us and the last scattering surface which contain coherent magnetic fields (whose strength can be orders of magnitude weaker than the current bounds), then photon-axion mixing can induce observable deviations in the CMB spectrum. Specifically, we show that the mixing can give rise to non-thermal spots on the CMB sky. As an example we consider the well known CMB cold spot, which according to the Planck data has a weak distortion from a black body spectrum, that can be fit by our model. While this explanation of the non-thermality in the region of the cold spot is quite intriguing, photon-axion oscillation do not explain the temperature of the cold spot itself. Nevertheless we demonstrate the possible sensitivity of the CMB to ultralight axions which could be exploited by observers.
  • The coupling of a composite Higgs to the standard model fields can deviate substantially from the standard model values. In this case perturbative unitarity might break down before the scale of compositeness is reached, which would suggest that additional composites should lie well below this scale. In this paper we account for the presence of an additional spin 1 custodial triplet of rhos. We examine the implications of requiring perturbative unitarity up to the compositeness scale and find that one has to be close to saturating certain unitarity sum rules involving the Higgs and the rho couplings. Given these restrictions on the parameter space we investigate the main phenomenological consequences of the spin 1 triplet. We find that they can substantially enhance the Higgs di-photon rate at the LHC even with a reduced Higgs coupling to gauge bosons. The main existing LHC bounds arise from di-boson searches, especially in the experimentally clean channel where the charged rhos decay to a W-boson and a Z, which then decay leptonically. We find that a large range of interesting parameter space with 700 GeV < m(rho) < 2 TeV is currently experimentally viable.
  • We examine the possibility that the recently discovered 125 GeV higgs like resonance actually corresponds to a dilaton: the Goldstone boson of scale invariance spontaneously broken at a scale f. Comparing to LHC data we find that a dilaton can reproduce the observed couplings of the new resonance as long as f ~ v, the weak scale. This corresponds to the dynamical assumption that only operators charged under the electroweak gauge group obtain VEVs. The more difficult task is to keep the mass of the dilaton light compared to the dynamical scale, Lambda ~ 4 pi f, of the theory. In generic, non-supersymmetric theories one would expect the dilaton mass to be similar to Lambda. The mass of the dilaton can only be lowered at the price of some percent level (or worse) tuning and/or additional dynamical assumptions: one needs to suppress the contribution of the condensate to the vacuum energy (which would lead to a large dilaton quartic coupling), and to allow only almost marginal deformations of the CFT.
  • Recent measurements by the ATLAS and CMS experiments have excluded the Standard Model Higgs boson in the high mass region, even if it is produced with a significantly smaller cross section than expected. The bounds are dominated by the non-observation of a signal in the clean gold-plated mode $h\to ZZ\to 4\ell$ and, hence, are directly related to the special role of the Higgs in electroweak symmetry breaking. A smaller cross section in comparison to the Standard Model is expected if the Higgs is realized as an unparticle in the Unhiggs scenario. With the LHC probing $\sigma/\sigma^{SM}<1$, we can therefore reinterpret the $h\to ZZ\to 4\ell$ exclusion limits as bounds on the Unhiggs' scaling dimension. Throughout the high Higgs mass range, where we expect a large signal in the presence of the Standard Model Higgs for the 2011 ATLAS and CMS data sets, the observed limits translate into mild bounds on the Unhiggs scaling dimension in the high mass region.
  • We investigate whether or not perturbative unitarity is preserved in the Unhiggs model for the scattering process of heavy quarks and longitudinal gauge bosons $\bar q q \to V_L^+ V_L^-$. With the Yukawa coupling given in the original formulation of the Unhiggs model, the model preserves unitarity for Unhiggs scaling dimensions $d\leq 1.5$. We examine the LHC phenomenology that is implied by the Unhiggs model in this parameter range in detail and discuss to what extent the LHC can test $d$ if an excess is measured in the phenomenologically clean $ZZ$ channel in the future or if the LHC measurement remains consistent with the background. We then make use of the AdS/CFT correspondence to derive a new Yukawa coupling that is conformally invariant at high energies, and show that with this Yukawa coupling the theory is unitary for $1 \leq d < 2$.
  • We investigate N = 1 supersymmetric gauge theories where monopole condensation triggers supersymmetry breaking in a metastable vacuum. The low-energy effective theory is an O'Raifeartaigh-like model of the kind investigated recently by Shih where the R-symmetry can be spontaneously broken. We examine several implementations with varying degrees of phenomenological interest.
  • If low-energy supersymmetry is realized in nature, a seemingly contrived hierarchy in the squark mass spectrum appears to be required. We show that composite supersymmetric theories at the bottom of the conformal window can automatically yield the spectrum that is suggested by experimental data and naturalness. With a non-tuned choice of parameters, the only superpartners below one TeV will be the partners of the Higgs, the electroweak gauge bosons, the left-handed top and bottom, and the right-handed top, which are precisely the particles needed to make weak scale supersymmetry breaking natural. In the model considered here, these correspond to composite (or partially composite) degrees of freedom via Seiberg duality, while the other MSSM fields, with their heavier superpartners, are elementary. The key observation is that at or near the edge of the conformal window, soft supersymmetry breaking scalar and gaugino masses are transmitted only to fundamental particles at leading order. With the potential that arises from the duality, a Higgs with a 125 GeV mass, with nearly SM production rates, is naturally accommodated without tuning. The lightest ordinary superpartner is either the lightest stop or the lightest neutralino. If it is the stop, it is natural for it to be almost degenerate with the top, in which case it decays to top by emitting a very soft gravitino, making it quite difficult to find this mode at the LHC and more challenging to find SUSY in general, yielding a simple realization of the stealth supersymmetry idea. We analyze four benchmark spectra in detail.
  • We examine the possibility that the SU(2) gauge group of the standard model appears as the dual "magnetic" gauge group of a supersymmetric gauge theory, thus the W and Z (and through mixing, the photon) are composite (or partially composite) gauge bosons. Fully composite gauge bosons are expected to interact strongly at the duality scale, and a large running is needed to match the electroweak gauge couplings. Alternatively one can mix the composite "magnetic" gauge bosons with some elementary ones to obtain realistic models. In the simplest and most compelling example the Higgs and top are composite, the W and Z partially composite and the light fermions elementary. The effective theory is an NMSSM-type model where the singlet is a component of the composite meson. There is no little hierarchy problem and the Higgs mass can be as large as 400 GeV. This "fat Higgs"-like model can be considered as an explicit 4D implementation of RS-type models with gauge fields in the bulk.
  • We study models where the superpartners of the ordinary particles have continuous spectra rather than being discrete states, which can occur when the supersymmetric standard model is coupled to an approximately conformal sector. We show that when superpartners that are well into the continuum are produced at a collider they tend to have long decay chains that step their way down through the continuum, emitting many fairly soft standard model particles along the way, with a roughly spherical energy distribution in the center of mass frame.
  • We compute the top quark decay rate in the Unhiggs model. In this model, the longitudinally polarized W's are unparticles, owing to their Goldstone boson nature, while the transversely polarized W's are not. Thus the fraction of decays with a longitudinal W emitted is different than in the Standard Model. Comparing this calculation to CDF data, we are able to rule out some of the Unhiggs model parameter space. We also use the expected increased accuracy of top decay measurements at the LHC to anticipate further constraints on the Unhiggs.
  • We examine models where massless chiral fermions with both "electric" and "magnetic" hypercharges could form condensates. When some of the fermions are also electroweak doublets such condensates can break the electroweak gauge symmetry down to electromagnetism in the correct way. Since ordinary hypercharge is weakly coupled at the TeV scale, magnetic hypercharge is strongly coupled and can potentially drive the condensation. Such models are similar to technicolor, but with hypercharge playing the role of the technicolor gauge group, so the standard model gauge group breaks itself. A heavy top mass can be generated via the Rubakov-Callan effect and could thus decouple the scale of flavor physics from the electroweak scale.