• We analyze a $\Delta V\sim-9$ magnitude flare on the newly identified M8 dwarf SDSS J022116.84+194020.4 (hereafter SDSSJ0221) detected as part of the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN). Using infrared and optical spectra, we confirm that SDSSJ0221 is a relatively nearby (d$\sim$76 pc) M8 dwarf with strong quiescent H$\alpha$ emission. Based on kinematics and the absence of features consistent with low-gravity (young) ultracool dwarfs, we place a lower limit of 200 Myr on the age of SDSSJ0221. When modeled with a simple, classical flare light-curve, this flare is consistent with a total $U$-band flare energy $E_U\sim$ 10$^{34}$ erg, confirming that the most dramatic flares are not limited to warmer, more massive stars. Scaled to include a rough estimate of the emission line contribution to the $V$ band, we estimate a blackbody filling factor of $\sim$$10-30\%$ during the flare peak and $\sim$$0.5-1.6\%$ during the flare decay phase. These filling factors correspond to flare areas that are an order of magnitude larger than those measured for most mid-M dwarf flares.
  • While cosmic ray muons themselves are relatively easy to veto in underground detectors, their interactions with nuclei create more insidious backgrounds via: (i) the decays of long-lived isotopes produced by muon-induced spallation reactions inside the detector, (ii) spallation reactions initiated by fast muon-induced neutrons entering from outside the detector, and (iii) nuclear recoils initiated by fast muon-induced neutrons entering from outside the detector. These backgrounds, which are difficult to veto or shield against, are very important for solar, reactor, dark matter, and other underground experiments, especially as increased sensitivity is pursued. We used fluka to calculate the production rates and spectra of all prominent secondaries produced by cosmic ray muons, in particular focusing on secondary neutrons, due to their importance. Since the neutron spectrum is steeply falling, the total neutron production rate is sensitive just to the relatively soft neutrons, and not to the fast-neutron component. We show that the neutron spectrum in the range between 10 and 100 MeV can instead be probed by the (n, p)-induced isotope production rates 12C(n, p)12B and 16O(n, p)16N in oil- and water-based detectors. The result for 12B is in good agreement with the recent KamLAND measurement. Besides testing the calculation of muon secondaries, these results are also of practical importance, since 12B (T1/2 = 20.2 ms, Q = 13.4 MeV) and 16N (T1/2 = 7.13 s, Q = 10.4 MeV) are among the dominant spallation backgrounds in these detectors.