• The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory will be one of the largest ground-based very high-energy gamma-ray observatories. The On-Site Analysis will be the first CTA scientific analysis of data acquired from the array of telescopes, in both northern and southern sites. The On-Site Analysis will have two pipelines: the Level-A pipeline (also known as Real-Time Analysis, RTA) and the level-B one. The RTA performs data quality monitoring and must be able to issue automated alerts on variable and transient astrophysical sources within 30 seconds from the last acquired Cherenkov event that contributes to the alert, with a sensitivity not worse than the one achieved by the final pipeline by more than a factor of 3. The Level-B Analysis has a better sensitivity (not be worse than the final one by a factor of 2) and the results should be available within 10 hours from the acquisition of the data: for this reason this analysis could be performed at the end of an observation or next morning. The latency (in particular for the RTA) and the sensitivity requirements are challenging because of the large data rate, a few GByte/s. The remote connection to the CTA candidate site with a rather limited network bandwidth makes the issue of the exported data size extremely critical and prevents any kind of processing in real-time of the data outside the site of the telescopes. For these reasons the analysis will be performed on-site with infrastructures co-located with the telescopes, with limited electrical power availability and with a reduced possibility of human intervention. This means, for example, that the on-site hardware infrastructure should have low-power consumption. A substantial effort towards the optimization of high-throughput computing service is envisioned to provide hardware and software solutions with high-throughput, low-power consumption at a low-cost.
  • Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) interact en route to Earth, producing secondary gamma-rays. For the case of high cosmic ray power and weak intergalactic magnetic fields, the deflections of these UHECRs may be small leading to detectable gamma-ray fluxes that point back to their origin. We summarize current results and prospects of detecting a signature of these interactions using the current and next generation of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes.
  • VERITAS is an array of four 12-m imaging Cherenkov telescopes, sensitive to gamma rays in the energy range from 85 GeV to 30 TeV. VERITAS dedicates roughly 40% of its total observing time to blazars. We present recent highlights from the VERITAS blazar discovery and long-term monitoring programs. These observations have led to 25 blazar detections, including 10 VHE discoveries. The VERITAS cameras were recently upgraded, lowering the energy threshold and enhancing the sensitivity. This upgrade helped to establish four new blazar detections with data taken after the completion of the upgrade in summer 2012.
  • We present maximum-likelihood search methods for time-dependent fluxes from point sources, such as flares or periodic emissions. We describe a method for the case when the time dependence of the flux can be assumed a priori from other observations, and we additionally describe a method to search for bursts with an unknown time dependence. In the context of high energy neutrino astronomy, we simulate one year of data from a cubic-kilometer scale neutrino detector and characterize these methods and equivalent binned methods with respect to the duration of neutrino emission. Compared to standard time-integrated searches, we find that up to an order of magnitude fewer events are needed to discover bursts with short durations, even when the burst time and duration are not known a priori.
  • Neutrino telescopes are moving steadily toward the goal of detecting astrophysical neutrinos from the most powerful galactic and extragalactic sources. Here we describe analysis methods to search for high energy point-like neutrino sources using detectors deep in the ice or sea. We simulate an ideal cubic kilometer detector based on real world performance of existing detectors such as AMANDA, IceCube, and ANTARES. An unbinned likelihood ratio method is applied, making use of the point spread function and energy distribution of simulated neutrino signal events to separate them from the background of atmospheric neutrinos produced by cosmic ray showers. The unbinned point source analyses are shown to perform better than binned searches and, depending on the source spectral index, the use of energy information is shown to improve discovery potential by almost a factor of two.