• Hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I) have been predominantly found in low-metallicity, star-forming dwarf galaxies. Here we identify Gaia17biu/SN 2017egm as an SLSN-I occurring in a "normal" spiral galaxy (NGC 3191) in terms of stellar mass (several times 10^10 M_sun) and metallicity (roughly Solar). At redshift z=0.031, Gaia17biu is also the lowest redshift SLSN-I to date, and the absence of a larger population of SLSNe-I in dwarf galaxies of similar redshift suggests that metallicity is likely less important to the production of SLSNe-I than previously believed. With the smallest distance and highest apparent brightness for an SLSN-I, we are able to study Gaia17biu in unprecedented detail. Its pre-peak near-ultraviolet to optical color is similar to that of Gaia16apd and among the bluest observed for an SLSN-I while its peak luminosity (M_g = -21 mag) is substantially lower than Gaia16apd. Thanks to the high signal-to-noise ratios of our spectra, we identify several new spectroscopic features that may help to probe the properties of these enigmatic explosions. We detect polarization at the ~0.5% level that is not strongly dependent on wavelength, suggesting a modest, global departure from spherical symmetry. In addition, we put the tightest upper limit yet on the radio luminosity of an SLSN-I with <5.4x10^26 erg/s/Hz (at 10 GHz), which is almost a factor of 40 better than previous upper limits and one of the few measured at an early stage in the evolution of an SLSN-I. This limit largely rules out an association of this SLSNe-I with known populations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) like central engines.
  • We present the results of an extensive observational campaign on the nearby Type Ibn SN 2015G, including data from radio through ultraviolet wavelengths. SN 2015G was asymmetric, showing late-time nebular lines redshifted by ~1000 km/s. It shared many features with the prototypical SN In 2006jc, including extremely strong He I emssion lines and a late-time blue pseudocontinuum. The young SN 2015G showed narrow P-Cygni profiles of He I, but never in its evolution did it show any signature of hydrogen - arguing for a dense, ionized, and hydrogen-free circumstellar medium moving outward with a velocity of ~1000 km/s and created by relatively recent mass loss from the progenitor star. Ultraviolet through infrared observations show that the fading SN 2015G (which was probably discovered some 20 days post-peak) had a spectral energy distribution that was well described by a simple, single-component blackbody. Archival HST images provide upper limits on the luminosity of SN 2015G's progenitor, while nondetections of any luminous radio afterglow and optical nondetections of outbursts over the past two decades provide constraints upon its mass-loss history.
  • We present new [Ne II] (12.8 micron) IRTF/TEXES observations of the Galactic Center HII regions H1 and H2, which are at a projected distance of ~11 pc from the center of the Galaxy. The new observations allow to map the radial velocity distributions of ionized gas. The high spectroscopic resolution (~4 km/s) helps us to disentangle different velocity components and enables us to resolve previous ambiguity regarding the nature of these sources. The spatial distributions of the intensity and radial velocity of the [Ne II] line are mapped. In H1, the intensity distributions of the Paschen-\alpha (1.87 micron) and [Ne II] lines are significantly different, which suggests a strong variation of extinction across the HII region of A_K~0.56. The radial velocity distributions across these HII regions are consistent with the predictions of a bow-shock model for H1 and the pressure-driven model for H2. Furthermore, we find a concentration of bright stars in H2. These stars have similar H-K_s colors and can be explained as part of a 2 Myr old stellar cluster. H2 also falls on the orbit of the molecular clouds, suggested to be around Sgr A*. Our new results confirm what we had previously suggested: the O supergiant P114 in H1 is a runaway star, moving towards us through the -30-0 {km/s} molecular cloud, whereas the O If star P35 in H2 formed in-situ, and may mark the position of a so-far unknown small star cluster formed within the central 30 pc of the Galaxy.
  • The Type~Ia supernova (SN~Ia) 2016coj in NGC 4125 (redshift $z=0.004523$) was discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search 4.9 days after the fitted first-light time (FFLT; 11.1 days before $B$-band maximum). Our first detection (pre-discovery) is merely $0.6\pm0.5$ day after the FFLT, making SN 2016coj one of the earliest known detections of a SN Ia. A spectrum was taken only 3.7 hr after discovery (5.0 days after the FFLT) and classified as a normal SN Ia. We performed high-quality photometry, low- and high-resolution spectroscopy, and spectropolarimetry, finding that SN 2016coj is a spectroscopically normal SN Ia, but with a high velocity of \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 ($\sim 12,600$\,\kms\ around peak brightness). The \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 velocity evolution can be well fit by a broken-power-law function for up to a month after the FFLT. SN 2016coj has a normal peak luminosity ($M_B \approx -18.9 \pm 0.2$ mag), and it reaches a $B$-band maximum \about16.0~d after the FFLT. We estimate there to be low host-galaxy extinction based on the absence of Na~I~D absorption lines in our low- and high-resolution spectra. The spectropolarimetric data exhibit weak polarization in the continuum, but the \ion{Si}{2} line polarization is quite strong ($\sim 0.9\% \pm 0.1\%$) at peak brightness.
  • Supernova (SN) 2015U (also known as PSN J07285387+3349106) was discovered in NGC 2388 on 2015 Feb. 11. A rapidly evolving and luminous event, it showed effectively hydrogen-free spectra dominated by relatively narrow helium P-Cygni spectral features and it was classified as a SN Ibn. In this paper we present photometric, spectroscopic, and spectropolarimetric observations of SN 2015U, including a Keck/DEIMOS spectrum (resolution $\approx$ 5000) which fully resolves the optical emission and absorption features. We find that SN 2015U is best understood via models of shock breakout from extended and dense circumstellar material (CSM), likely created by a history of mass loss from the progenitor with an extreme outburst within $\sim$1-2 yr of core collapse (but we do not detect any outburst in our archival imaging of NGC 2388). We argue that the high luminosity of SN 2015U was powered not through $^{56}$Ni decay but via the deposition of kinetic energy into the ejecta/CSM shock interface. Though our analysis is hampered by strong host-galaxy dust obscuration (which likely exhibits multiple components), our dataset makes SN 2015U one of the best-studied Type Ibn supernovae and provides a bridge of understanding to other rapidly fading transients, both luminous and relatively faint.
  • We report the discovery of 19 hot, evolved, massive stars near the Galactic center region (GCR). These objects were selected for spectroscopy owing to their detection as strong sources of Paschen-alpha emission-line excess, following a narrowband imaging survey of the central 0.65 x 0.25 degress (l, b) around Sgr A* with the Hubble Space Telescope. Discoveries include 5 carbon-type (WC) and 6 nitrogen-type (WN) Wolf-Rayet stars, 6 O supergiants, and 2 B supergiants. Two of the O supergiants have X-ray counterparts, the properties of which are broadly consistent with colliding-wind binaries and solitary O stars. The infrared photometry of 17 stars is consistent with the Galactic center distance, but 2 of them are located in the foreground. Several WC stars exhibit a relatively large infrared excesses, which is possibly the signature of thermal emission from hot dust. Most of the stars appear scattered throughout the GCR, with no relation to the three known massive young clusters; several others lie near the Arches and Quintuplet clusters and may have originated within one of these systems. The results of this work bring the total sample of Wolf-Rayet stars in the GCR to 92. All sources of strong P-alpha excess have been identified in the area surveyed with HST, which implies that the sample of WN stars in this region is near completion, and is dominated by late (WNL) types. The current WC sample, although probably not complete, is almost exclusively dominated by late (WCL) types. The observed Wolf-Rayet subtype distribution in the GCR is a reflection of the intrinsic rarity of early subtypes (WNE and WCE) in the inner Galaxy, an effect that is driven by metallicity.
  • Outside of the known star clusters in the Galactic Center, a large number of evolved massive stars have been detected; but their origins remain uncertain. We present a spectroscopic study of eight such stars, based on new Gemini GNIRS and NIFS near-infrared observations. This work has led to the discovery of a new O If+ star. We compare the reddening-corrected J-K vs K diagram for our stars with the massive ones in the Arches cluster and use stellar evolutionary tracks to constrain their ages and masses. The radial velocities of both the stars and their nearby H II regions are also reported. All of the stars are blueshifted relative to the Arches cluster by > 50 km/s. We find that our source P35 has a velocity consistent with that of the surrounding molecular gas. The velocity gradient of nearby ionized gas along the Gemini GNIRS long slit, relative to P35 and the adjacent -30-0 km/s molecular cloud, can best be explained by a pressure-driven flow model. Thus, P35 most likely formed in situ. Three more of our stars have radial velocities different from their adjacent molecular gas, indicating that they are interlopers. The four stars closest to the Arches cluster have similar spectra, ages and masses to known cluster members, suggesting that they were likely ejected from the cluster via three-body interactions. Therefore, we find that the relatively isolated stars partly formed in situ and partly were ejected from the known star clusters in the Galactic Center.
  • We present our recent efforts to unveil and understand the origin of massive stars outside the three massive star clusters in the Galactic Center. From our HST/NICMOS survey of the Galactic Center, we have identified 180 Paschen-alpha emitting sources, most of which should be evolved massive stars with strong optically thin stellar winds. Recently, we obtained Gemini GNIRS/NIFS H- and K-band spectra of eight massive stars near the Arches cluster. From their radial velocities, ages and masses, we suggest that in our sample, two stars are previous members of the Arches cluster, while other two stars embedded in the H1/H2 HII regions formed in-situ.
  • The recent supernova (SN) known as SN 2009ip had dramatic precursor eruptions followed by an even brighter explosion in 2012. Its pre-2012 observations make it the best documented SN progenitor in history, but have fueled debate about the nature of its 2012 explosion --- whether it was a true SN or some type of violent non-terminal event. Both could power shock interaction with circumstellar material (CSM), but only a core-collapse SN provides a self-consistent explanation. The persistent broad emission lines in the spectrum require a relatively large ejecta mass, and a corresponding kinetic energy of at least 10^51 erg, while the faint 2012a event is consistent with published models of core-collapse SNe from compact (~60 R_Sun) blue supergiants. The light curves of SN 2009ip and another Type IIn, SN 2010mc, were nearly identical; we demonstrate that their spectra match as well, and that both are standard SNe IIn. Our observations contradict the recent claim that the late-time spectrum of SN 2009ip is returning to its progenitor's LBV-like state, and we show that late-time spectra of SN 2009ip closely resemble spectra of SN 1987A. Moreover, SN 2009ip's changing H-alpha equivalent width after explosion matches behavior typically seen in core-collapse SNe IIn. Several key facts about SN 2009ip and SN 2010mc argue strongly in favor of a core-collapse interpretation, and make a non-terminal 10^50 erg event implausible. The most straighforward and self-consistent interpretation is that SN 2009ip was an initially faint core-collapse explosion of a blue supergiant that produced about half as much 56-Ni as SN 1987A, with most of the peak luminosity from CSM interaction.
  • We report late-time spectroscopic observations of the Type IIn SN 1998S, taken 14 years after explosion using the Large Binocular Telescope. The optical spectrum exhibits broad emission features of [O I], [O II], [O III], H-alpha, H-beta, and [Fe II]. The last decade of evolution has exhibited a strengthening of the oxygen transitions, evidence that the late-time emission is powered by increasingly metal-rich SN ejecta crossing the reverse shock. The H-alpha luminosity requires that SN 1998S is still interacting with dense circumstellar material (CSM), probably produced by the strong wind of a red supergiant progenitor at least ~1000 years before explosion. The emission lines exhibit asymmetric blueshifted profiles, which implies that the receding hemisphere of the SN is obscured by dust. The [O III] line, in particular, exhibits a complete suppression of its red wing. This could be the result of the expected wavelength dependence for dust extinction or a smaller radial distribution for [O III]. In the latter case, the red wing of [O III] could be absorbed by core dust, while both the blue and red wings are absorbed by dust within the cool dense shell between the forward and reverse shocks; this interpretation could explain why late-time [O III] emission from SNe is often weaker than models predict. The [O I] line exhibits double-peaked structure on top of the broader underlying profile, possibly due to emission from individual clumps of ejecta or ring-like structures of metal-rich debris. The centroids of the peaks are blueshifted and lack a red counterpart. However, an archival spectrum obtained on day 1093 exhibits a third, redshifted peak, which we suspect has become extinguished by dust that formed over the last decade. This implies that the "missing" red components of multi-peaked oxygen profiles observed in other SNe might be obscured by varying degrees of dust extinction.
  • We have spectroscopically discovered a pair of twin, nitrogen-type, hydrogen-rich, Wolf-Rayet stars (WN8-9h) that are both surrounded by circular, mid-infrared-bright nebulae detected with the Spitzer Space Telescope and MIPS instrument. The emission is probably dominated by a thermal continuum from cool dust, but also may contain contributions from atomic line emission. There is no counterpart at shorter Spitzer/IRAC wavelengths, indicating a lack of emission from warm dust. The two nebulae are probably wind-swept stellar ejecta released by the central stars during a prior evolutionary phase. The nebulae partially overlap on the sky and we speculate on the possibility that they are in the early stage of a collision. Two other evolved massive stars have also been identified within the area subtended by the nebulae, including a carbon-type Wolf-Rayet star (WC8) and an O7-8 III-I star, the latter of which appears to be embedded in one of the larger WN8-9h nebulae. The derived distances to these stars imply that they are coeval members of an association lying 4.9 (1.2) kpc from Earth, near the intersection of the Galaxy's Long Bar and the Scutum-Centaurus spiral arm. This new association represents an unprecedented display of complex interactions between multiple stellar winds, outflows, and the radiation fields of evolved massive stars.