• Type I X-ray bursts are produced by thermonuclear runaways that develop on accreting neutron stars. Once one location ignites, the flame propagates across the surface of the star. Flame propagation is fundamental in order to understand burst properties like rise time and burst oscillations. Previous work quantified the effects of rotation on the front, showing that the flame propagates as a deflagration and that the front strongly resembles a hurricane. However the effect of magnetic fields was not investigated, despite the fact that magnetic fields strong enough to have an effect on the propagating flame are expected to be present on many bursters. In this paper we show how the coupling between fluid layers introduced by an initially vertical magnetic field plays a decisive role in determining the character of the fronts that are responsible for the Type I bursts. In particular, on a star spinning at 450 Hz (typical among the bursters) we test seed magnetic fields of $10^{7} - 10^{10}$ G and find that for the medium fields the magnetic stresses that develop during the burst can speed up the velocity of the burning front, bringing the simulated burst rise time close to the observed values. By contrast, in a magnetic slow rotator like IGR J17480--2446, spinning at 11 Hz, a seed field $\gtrsim 10^9$ G is required to allow localized ignition and the magnetic field plays an integral role in generating the burst oscillations observed during the bursts.
  • From pulsar scintillations we infer the presence of sheet-like structures in the ISM; it has been suggested that these are current sheets. Current sheets probably play an important role in heating the solar corona, and there is evidence for their presence in the solar wind. Such magnetic discontinuities have been found in numerical simulations with particular boundary conditions, as well as in simulations using an incompressible equation of state. Here, I investigate their formation under more general circumstances by means of topological considerations as well as numerical simulations of the relaxation of an arbitrary smoothly-varying magnetic field. The simulations are performed with a variety of parameters and boundary conditions: in low, high and of-order-unity plasma-$\beta$ regimes, with periodic and fixed boundaries, with and without a friction force, at various resolutions and with various diffusivities. Current sheets form, over a dynamical timescale, under {\it all} conditions explored. At higher resolution they are thinner, and there is a greater number of weaker current sheets. The magnetic field eventually relaxes into a smooth minimum energy state, the energy of which depends on the magnetic helicity, as well as on the nature of the boundaries.
  • We present 3D MHD simulations of purely toroidal and mixed poloidal-toroidal magnetic field configurations to study the behavior of the Tayler instability. For the first time the simultaneous action of rotation and magnetic diffusion are taken into account and the effects of a poloidal field on the dynamic evolution of unstable toroidal magnetic fields is included. In the absence of diffusion, fast rotation (rotation rate compared to Alfv\'en frequency) is able to suppress the instability when the rotation and magnetic axes are aligned and when the radial field strength gradient p < 1.5. When diffusion is included, this system turns unstable for diffusion dominated and marginally diffusive dominated regions. If the magnetic and rotation axes are perpendicular to each other the stabilizing effect induced by the Coriolis force is scale dependent and decreases with increasing wavenumber. In toroidal fields with radial field gradients bigger than p > 1.5, rapid rotation does not suppress the instability but instead introduces a damping factor to the growth rate in agreement with the analytic predictions. For the mixed poloidal-toroidal fields we find an unstable axisymmetric mode, not predicted analytically, right at the stability threshold for the non-axisymmetric modes; it has been argued that an axisymmetric mode is necessary for the closure of the Tayler-Spruit dynamo loop.
  • In a previous study on thermonuclear (type I) nursts on accreting neutron stars we addressed and demonstrated the importance of the effects of rotation, through the Coriolis force, on the propagation of the burning flame. However, that study only analysed cases of longitudinal propagation, where the Coriolis force coefficient $2\Omega\cos\theta$ was constant. In this paper, we study the effects of rotation on propagation in the meridional (latitudinal) direction, where the Coriolis force changes from its maximum at the poles to zero at the equator. We find that the zero Coriolis force at the equator, while affecting the structure of the flame, does not prevent its propagation from one hemisphere to another. We also observe structural differences between the flame propagating towards the equator and that propagating towards the pole, the second being faster. In the light of the recent discovery of the low spin frequency of burster IGR~J17480-2446 rotating at 11 Hz (for which Coriolis effects should be negligible) we also extend our simulations to slow rotation.
  • The nature of the mechanisms apparently driving X-rays from intermediate mass stars lacking strong convection zones or massive winds remains poorly understood, and the possible role of hidden, lower mass close companions is still unclear. A 20ks Chandra HRC-I observation of HR 4796A, an 8 Myr old main sequence A0 star devoid of close stellar companions, has been used to search for a signature or remnant of magnetic activity from the Herbig Ae phase. X-rays were not detected and the X-ray luminosity upper limit was L_X =< 1.3x10^27 erg/s. The result is discussed in the context of various scenarios for generating magnetic activity, including rotational shear and subsurface convection. A dynamo driven by natal differential rotation is unlikely to produce observable X rays, chiefly because of the difficulty in getting the dissipated energy up to the surface of the star. A subsurface convection layer produced by the ionisation of helium could host a dynamo that should be effective throughout the main-sequence but can only produce X-ray luminosities of order 10^25 erg/s. This luminosity lies only moderately below the current detection limit for Vega. Our study supports the idea that X-ray production in Herbig Ae/Be stars is linked largely to the accretion process rather than the properties of the underlying star, and that early A stars generally decline in X-ray luminosity at least 100,000 fold in only a few million years.
  • I review our current knowledge of magnetic fields in stars more massive than around 1.5 Msun, in particular their nature and origin. This includes the strong magnetic fields found in a subset of the population and the fossil field theory invoked to explain them; the subgauss fields detected in Vega and Sirius and their possible origin; and what we can infer about magnetic activity in massive stars and how it might be linked to subsurface convection.
  • We present the first vertically resolved hydrodynamic simulations of a laterally propagating, deflagrating flame in the thin helium ocean of a rotating accreting neutron star. We use a new hydrodynamics solver tailored to deal with the large discrepancy in horizontal and vertical length scales typical of neutron star oceans, and which filters out sound waves that would otherwise limit our timesteps. We find that the flame moves horizontally with velocities of order $10^5$ cm s$^{-1}$, crossing the ocean in few seconds, broadly consistent with the rise times of Type I X-ray bursts. We address the open question of what drives flame propagation, and find that heat is transported from burning to unburnt fuel by a combination of top-to-bottom conduction and mixing driven by a baroclinic instability. The speed of the flame propagation is therefore a sensitive function of the ocean conductivity and spin: we explore this dependence for an astrophysically relevant range of parameters and find that in general flame propagation is faster for slower rotation and higher conductivity.
  • In gravitationally stratified fluids, length scales are normally much greater in the horizontal direction than in the vertical one. When modelling these fluids it can be advantageous to use the hydrostatic approximation, which filters out vertically propagating sound waves and thus allows a greater timestep. We briefly review this approximation, which is commonplace in atmospheric physics, and compare it to other approximations used in astrophysics such as Boussinesq and anelastic, finding that it should be the best approximation to use in context such as radiative stellar zones, compact objects, stellar or planetary atmospheres and other contexts. We describe a finite-difference numerical scheme which uses this approximation, which includes magnetic fields.
  • Strong magnetic fields play a crucial role in the removal of angular momentum from collapsing clouds and protostellar discs and are necessary for the formation of disc winds as well as jets from the inner disc and indeed, strong large-scale poloidal magnetic fields are observed in protostellar discs at all radii down to $\sim 10 R_\odot$. Nevertheless, by the time the star is visible virtually all of the original magnetic flux has vanished. I explore mechanisms for removing this flux during the formation of the protostar once it is magnetically disconnected from the parent cloud, looking at both radiative and convective protostars. This includes a numerical investigation of buoyant magnetic field removal from convective stars. It is found that if the star goes through a fully convective phase all remaining flux can easily be removed from the protostar, essentially on an Alfv\'en timescale. If on the other hand the protostar has no fully convective phase then some flux can be retained, the quantity depending on the net magnetic helicity, which is probably quite small. Only some fraction of this flux is visible at the stellar surface. I also look at how the same mechanisms could prevent flux from accreting onto the star at all, meaning that mass would only accrete as fast as it is able to slip past the flux.
  • Weak magnetic fields have recently been detected in Vega and Sirius. Here, we explore the possibility that these fields are the remnants of some field inherited or created during or shortly after star formation and, unlike true fossil fields, are still evolving as we observe them. The timescale of this evolution is given in terms of the Alfven timescale and the rotation frequency by tau_evol ~ tau_A^2 Omega, which would be comparable to the age of the star. It is shown that it is likely that all intermediate- and high-mass stars contain fields of at least the order of the strength found so far in Vega and Sirius. Faster rotators are expected to have stronger magnetic fields. Stars may experience an increase in field strength during their early main-sequence, but for most of their lives field strength will decrease slowly. The length scale of the magnetic structure on the surface may be small in very young stars but should quickly increase to at least very approximately a fifth of the stellar radius.
  • Hot luminous stars show a variety of phenomena in their photospheres and winds which still lack clear physical explanation. Among these phenomena are photospheric turbulence, line profile variability (LPV), non-thermal emission, non-radial pulsations, discrete absorption components (DACs) and wind clumping. Cantiello et al. (2009) argued that a convection zone close to the stellar surface could be responsible for some of these phenomena. This convective zone is caused by a peak in the opacity associated with iron-group elements and is referred to as the "iron convection zone" (FeCZ). Assuming dynamo action producing magnetic fields at equipartition in the FeCZ, we investigate the occurrence of subsurface magnetism in OB stars. Then we study the surface emergence of these magnetic fields and discuss possible observational signatures of magnetic spots. Simple estimates are made using the subsurface properties of massive stars, as calculated in 1D stellar evolution models. We find that magnetic fields of sufficient amplitude to affect the wind could emerge at the surface via magnetic buoyancy. While at this stage it is difficult to predict the geometry of these features, we show that magnetic spots of size comparable to the local pressure scale height can manifest themselves as hot, bright spots. Localized magnetic fields could be widespread in those early type stars that have subsurface convection. This type of surface magnetism could be responsible for photometric variability and play a role in X-ray emission and wind clumping.
  • Hot luminous stars show a variety of phenomena in their photospheres and in their winds which still lack clear physical explanations at this time. Among these phenomena are non-thermal line broadening, line profile variability (LPVs), discrete absorption components (DACs), wind clumping and stochastically excited pulsations. Cantiello et al. (2009) argued that a convection zone close to the surface of hot, massive stars, could be responsible for some of these phenomena. This convective zone is caused by a peak in the opacity due to iron recombination and for this reason is referred as the "iron convection zone" (FeCZ). 3D MHD simulations are used to explore the possible effects of such subsurface convection on the surface properties of hot, massive stars. We argue that turbulence and localized magnetic spots at the surface are the likely consequence of subsurface convection in early type stars.
  • During their main sequence evolution, massive stars can develop convective regions very close to their surface. These regions are caused by an opacity peak associated with iron ionization. Cantiello et al. (2009) found a possible connection between the presence of sub-photospheric convective motions and small scale stochastic velocities in the photosphere of early-type stars. This supports a physical mechanism where microturbulence is caused by waves that are triggered by subsurface convection zones. They further suggest that clumping in the inner parts of the winds of OB stars could be related to subsurface convection, and that the convective layers may also be responsible for stochastic excitation of non-radial pulsations. Furthermore, magnetic fields produced in the iron convection zone could appear at the surface of such massive stars. Therefore subsurface convection could be responsible for the occurrence of observable phenomena such as line profile variability and discrete absorption components. These phenomena have been observed for decades, but still evade a clear theoretical explanation. Here we present preliminary results from 3D MHD simulations of such subsurface convection.
  • Observations of clusters of galaxies show ubiquitous presence of X-ray cavities, presumably blown by the AGN jets. We consider magnetic field structures of these cavities. Stability requires that they contain both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, while realistic configurations should have vanishing magnetic field on the boundary. For axisymmetric configurations embedded in unmagnetized plasma, the continuity of poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components on the surface of the bubble then requires solving the elliptical Grad-Shafranov equation with both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. This leads to a double eigenvalue problem, relating the pressure gradients and the toroidal magnetic field to the radius of the bubble. We have found fully analytical stable solutions. This result is confirmed by numerical simulation. We present synthetic X-ray images and synchrotron emission profiles and evaluate the rotation measure for radiation traversing the bubble.
  • X-ray images of galaxy clusters often display underdense bubbles which are apparently inflated by AGN outflow. I consider the evolution of the magnetic field inside such a bubble, using a mixture of analytic and numerical methods. It is found that the field relaxes into an equilibrium filling the entire volume of the bubble. The timescale on which this happens depends critically on the magnetisation and helicity of the outflow as well as on properties of the surrounding ICM. If the outflow is strongly magnetised, the magnetic field undergoes reconnection on a short timescale, magnetic energy being converted into heat whilst the characteristic length scale of the field rises; this process stops when a global equilibrium is reached. The strength of the equilibrium field is determined by the magnetic helicity injected into the bubble by the AGN: if the outflow has a consistent net flux and consequently a large helicity then a global equilibrium will be reached on a short timescale, whereas a low-helicity outflow results in no global equilibrium being reached and at the time of observation reconnection will be ongoing. However, localised flux-tube equilibria will form. If, on the other hand, the outflow is very weakly magnetised, no reconnection occurs and the magnetic field inside the bubble remains small-scale and passive. These results have implications for the internal composition of the bubbles, their interaction with ICM -- in particular to explain how bubbles could move a large distance through the ICM without breaking up -- as well as for the cooling flow problem in general. In addition, reconnection sites in a bubble could be a convenient source of energetic particles, circumventing the problem of synchrotron emitters having a shorter lifetime than the age of the bubble they inhabit.
  • A detailed study spanning approximately a year has been conducted on the Type Ib supernova 2007Y. Imaging was obtained from X-ray to radio wavelengths, and a comprehensive set of multi-band (w2m2w1u'g'r'i'UBVYJHKs) light curves and optical spectroscopy is presented. A virtually complete bolometric light curve is derived, from which we infer a (56)Ni-mass of 0.06 M_sun. The early spectrum strongly resembles SN 2005bf and exhibits high-velocity features of CaII and H_alpha; during late epochs the spectrum shows evidence of a ejecta-wind interaction. Nebular emission lines have similar widths and exhibit profiles that indicate a lack of major asymmetry in the ejecta. Late phase spectra are modeled with a non-LTE code, from which we find (56)Ni, O and total-ejecta masses (excluding He) to be 0.06, 0.2 and 0.42 M_sun, respectively, below 4,500 km/s. The (56)Ni mass confirms results obtained from the bolometric light curve. The oxygen abundance suggests the progenitor was most likely a ~3.3 M_sun He core star that evolved from a zero-age-main-sequence mass of 10-13 M_sun. The explosion energy is determined to be ~10^50 erg, and the mass-loss rate of the progenitor is constrained from X-ray and radio observations to be <~10^-6 M_sun/yr. SN 2007Y is among the least energetic normal Type Ib supernovae ever studied.
  • An arbitrary initial magnetic field in an A star evolves into a stable equilibrium. Simulations are presented of the formation of non-axisymmetric equilibria consisting of twisted flux tubes meandering under the surface of the star, and analytic arguments are given relating the stability and form of these equilibria. These results may help to explain observations of Ap stars with very non-dipolar fields. This work is also applicable to other essentially non-convective stars such as white dwarfs and neutron stars.
  • We present numerical models of hydromagnetic instabilities under the conditions prevailing in a stably stratified, non-convective stellar interior, and compare them with previous results of analytic work on instabilities in purely toroidal fields. We confirm that an $m=1$ mode (`kink') is the dominant instability in a toroidal field in which the field strength is proportional to distance from the axis, such as the field formed by the winding up of a weak field by differential rotation. We measure the growth rate of the instability as a function of field strength and rotation rate $\Omega$, and investigate the effects of a stabilising thermal stratification as well as magnetic and thermal diffusion on the stability. Where comparison is computationally feasible, the results agree with analytic predictions.