• Echo-State Networks and Reservoir Computing have been studied for more than a decade. They provide a simpler yet powerful alternative to Recurrent Neural Networks, every internal weight is fixed and only the last linear layer is trained. They involve many multiplications by dense random matrices. Very large networks are difficult to obtain, as the complexity scales quadratically both in time and memory. Here, we present a novel optical implementation of Echo-State Networks using light-scattering media and a Digital Micromirror Device. As a proof of concept, binary networks have been successfully trained to predict the chaotic Mackey-Glass time series. This new method is fast, power efficient and easily scalable to very large networks.
  • Recently introduced angular-memory-effect based techniques enable non-invasive imaging of objects hidden behind thin scattering layers. However, both the speckle-correlation and the bispectrum analysis are based on the statistical average of large amounts of speckle grains, which determines that they can hardly access the important information of the point-spread-function (PSF) of a highly scattering imaging system. Here, inspired by notions used in astronomy, we present a phase-diversity speckle imaging scheme, based on recording a sequence of intensity speckle patterns at various imaging planes, and experimentally demonstrate that in addition to being able to retrieve diffraction-limited image of hidden objects, phase-diversity can also simultaneously estimate the pupil function and the PSF of a highly scattering imaging system without any guide-star nor reference.
  • Fourier ptychography is a new computational microscopy technique that provides gigapixel-scale intensity and phase images with both wide field-of-view and high resolution. By capturing a stack of low-resolution images under different illumination angles, a nonlinear inverse algorithm can be used to computationally reconstruct the high-resolution complex field. Here, we compare and classify multiple proposed inverse algorithms in terms of experimental robustness. We find that the main sources of error are noise, aberrations and mis-calibration (i.e. model mis-match). Using simulations and experiments, we demonstrate that the choice of cost function plays a critical role, with amplitude-based cost functions performing better than intensity-based ones. The reason for this is that Fourier ptychography datasets consist of images from both brightfield and darkfield illumination, representing a large range of measured intensities. Both noise (e.g. Poisson noise) and model mis-match errors are shown to scale with intensity. Hence, algorithms that use an appropriate cost function will be more tolerant to both noise and model mis-match. Given these insights, we propose a global Newton's method algorithm which is robust and computationally efficient. Finally, we discuss the impact of procedures for algorithmic correction of aberrations and mis-calibration.