• New physics has traditionally been expected in the high-$p_T$ region at high-energy collider experiments. If new particles are light and weakly-coupled, however, this focus may be completely misguided: light particles are typically highly concentrated within a few mrad of the beam line, allowing sensitive searches with small detectors, and even extremely weakly-coupled particles may be produced in large numbers there. We propose a new experiment, ForwArd Search ExpeRiment, or FASER, which would be placed downstream of the ATLAS or CMS interaction point (IP) in the very forward region and operated concurrently there. Two representative on-axis locations are studied: a far location, $400~\text{m}$ from the IP and just off the beam tunnel, and a near location, just $150~\text{m}$ from the IP and right behind the TAN neutral particle absorber. For each location, we examine leading neutrino- and beam-induced backgrounds. As a concrete example of light, weakly-coupled particles, we consider dark photons produced through light meson decay and proton bremsstrahlung. We find that even a relatively small and inexpensive cylindrical detector, with a radius of $\sim 10~\text{cm}$ and length of $5-10~\text{m}$, depending on the location, can discover dark photons in a large and unprobed region of parameter space with dark photon mass $m_{A'} \sim 10~\text{MeV} - 1~\text{GeV}$ and kinetic mixing parameter $\epsilon \sim 10^{-7} - 10^{-3}$. FASER will clearly also be sensitive to many other forms of new physics. We conclude with a discussion of topics for further study that will be essential for understanding FASER's feasibility, optimizing its design, and realizing its discovery potential.
  • FASER, ForwArd Search ExpeRiment at the LHC, has been proposed as a small, very far forward detector to discover new, light, weakly-coupled particles. Previous work showed that with a total volume of just $\sim 0.1 - 1~\rm{m}^3$, FASER can discover dark photons in a large swath of currently unconstrained parameter space, extending the discovery reach of the LHC program. Here we explore FASER's discovery prospects for dark Higgs bosons. These scalar particles are an interesting foil for dark photons, as they probe a different renormalizable portal interaction and are produced dominantly through $B$ and $K$ meson decays, rather than pion decays, leading to less collimated signals. Nevertheless, we find that FASER is also a highly sensitive probe of dark Higgs bosons with significant discovery prospects that are comparable to, and complementary to, much larger proposed experiments.
  • Dark matter may interact with the Standard Model through the kinetic mixing of dark photons, $A'$, with Standard Model photons. Such dark matter will accumulate in the Sun and annihilate into dark photons. The dark photons may then leave the Sun and decay into pairs of charged Standard Model particles that can be detected by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer. The directionality of this "dark sunshine" is distinct from all astrophysical backgrounds, providing an opportunity for unambiguous dark matter discovery by AMS. We perform a complete analysis of this scenario including Sommerfeld enhancements of dark matter annihilation and the effect of the Sun's magnetic field on the signal, and we define a set of cuts to optimize the signal probability. With the three years of data already collected, AMS may discover dark matter with mass 1 TeV $\lesssim m_X \lesssim$ 10 TeV, dark photon masses $m_{A'} \sim \mathcal O(100)$ MeV, and kinetic mixing parameters $10^{-10} \lesssim \varepsilon \lesssim 10^{-8}$. The proposed search extends beyond existing beam dump and supernova bounds, and it is complementary to direct detection, probing the same region of parameter space for elastic dark matter, but potentially far more in the case of inelastic dark matter.
  • Dark matter may be charged under dark electromagnetism with a dark photon that kinetically mixes with the Standard Model photon. In this framework, dark matter will collect at the center of the Earth and annihilate into dark photons, which may reach the surface of the Earth and decay into observable particles. We determine the resulting signal rates, including Sommerfeld enhancements, which play an important role in bringing the Earth's dark matter population to their maximal, equilibrium value. For dark matter masses $m_X \sim$ 100 GeV - 10 TeV, dark photon masses $m_{A'} \sim$ MeV - GeV, and kinetic mixing parameters $\varepsilon \sim 10^{-10} - 10^{-8}$, the resulting electrons, muons, photons, and hadrons that point back to the center of the Earth are a smoking-gun signal of dark matter that may be detected by a variety of experiments, including neutrino telescopes, such as IceCube, and space-based cosmic ray detectors, such as Fermi-LAT and AMS. We determine the signal rates and characteristics, and show that large and striking signals---such as parallel muon tracks---are possible in regions of the $(m_{A'}, \varepsilon)$ plane that are not probed by direct detection, accelerator experiments, or astrophysical observations.
  • Dark photons in the MeV to GeV mass range are important targets for experimental searches. We consider the case where dark photons $A'$ decay invisibly to hidden dark matter $X$ through $A' \to XX$. For generic masses, proposed accelerator searches are projected to probe the thermal target region of parameter space, where the $X$ particles annihilate through $XX \to A' \to \text{SM}$ in the early universe and freeze out with the correct relic density. However, if $m_{A'} \approx 2m_X$, dark matter annihilation is resonantly enhanced, shifting the thermal target region to weaker couplings. For $\sim 10\%$ degeneracies, we find that the annihilation cross section is generically enhanced by four (two) orders of magnitude for scalar (pseudo-Dirac) dark matter. For such moderate degeneracies, the thermal target region drops to weak couplings beyond the reach of all proposed accelerator experiments in the scalar case and becomes extremely challenging in the pseudo-Dirac case. Proposed direct detection experiments can probe moderate degeneracies in the scalar case. For greater degeneracies, the effect of the resonance can be even more significant, and both scalar and pseudo-Dirac cases are beyond the reach of all proposed accelerator and direct detection experiments. For scalar dark matter, we find an absolute minimum that sets the ultimate experimental sensitivity required to probe the entire thermal target parameter space, but for pseudo-Dirac fermions, we find no such thermal target floor.
  • Marco Battaglieri, Alberto Belloni, Aaron Chou, Priscilla Cushman, Bertrand Echenard, Rouven Essig, Juan Estrada, Jonathan L. Feng, Brenna Flaugher, Patrick J. Fox, Peter Graham, Carter Hall, Roni Harnik, JoAnne Hewett, Joseph Incandela, Eder Izaguirre, Daniel McKinsey, Matthew Pyle, Natalie Roe, Gray Rybka, Pierre Sikivie, Tim M. P. Tait, Natalia Toro, Richard Van De Water, Neal Weiner, Kathryn Zurek, Eric Adelberger, Andrei Afanasev, Derbin Alexander, James Alexander, Vasile Cristian Antochi, David Mark Asner, Howard Baer, Dipanwita Banerjee, Elisabetta Baracchini, Phillip Barbeau, Joshua Barrow, Noemie Bastidon, James Battat, Stephen Benson, Asher Berlin, Mark Bird, Nikita Blinov, Kimberly K. Boddy, Mariangela Bondi, Walter M. Bonivento, Mark Boulay, James Boyce, Maxime Brodeur, Leah Broussard, Ranny Budnik, Philip Bunting, Marc Caffee, Sabato Stefano Caiazza, Sheldon Campbell, Tongtong Cao, Gianpaolo Carosi, Massimo Carpinelli, Gianluca Cavoto, Andrea Celentano, Jae Hyeok Chang, Swapan Chattopadhyay, Alvaro Chavarria, Chien-Yi Chen, Kenneth Clark, John Clarke, Owen Colegrove, Jonathon Coleman, David Cooke, Robert Cooper, Michael Crisler, Paolo Crivelli, Francesco D'Eramo, Domenico D'Urso, Eric Dahl, William Dawson, Marzio De Napoli, Raffaella De Vita, Patrick DeNiverville, Stephen Derenzo, Antonia Di Crescenzo, Emanuele Di Marco, Keith R. Dienes, Milind Diwan, Dongwi Handiipondola Dongwi, Alex Drlica-Wagner, Sebastian Ellis, Anthony Chigbo Ezeribe, Glennys Farrar, Francesc Ferrer, Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano, Alessandra Filippi, Giuliana Fiorillo, Bartosz Fornal, Arne Freyberger, Claudia Frugiuele, Cristian Galbiati, Iftah Galon, Susan Gardner, Andrew Geraci, Gilles Gerbier, Mathew Graham, Edda Gschwendtner, Christopher Hearty, Jaret Heise, Reyco Henning, Richard J. Hill, David Hitlin, Yonit Hochberg, Jason Hogan, Maurik Holtrop, Ziqing Hong, Todd Hossbach, T. B. Humensky, Philip Ilten, Kent Irwin, John Jaros, Robert Johnson, Matthew Jones, Yonatan Kahn, Narbe Kalantarians, Manoj Kaplinghat, Rakshya Khatiwada, Simon Knapen, Michael Kohl, Chris Kouvaris, Jonathan Kozaczuk, Gordan Krnjaic, Valery Kubarovsky, Eric Kuflik, Alexander Kusenko, Rafael Lang, Kyle Leach, Tongyan Lin, Mariangela Lisanti, Jing Liu, Kun Liu, Ming Liu, Dinesh Loomba, Joseph Lykken, Katherine Mack, Jeremiah Mans, Humphrey Maris, Thomas Markiewicz, Luca Marsicano, C. J. Martoff, Giovanni Mazzitelli, Christopher McCabe, Samuel D. McDermott, Art McDonald, Bryan McKinnon, Dongming Mei, Tom Melia, Gerald A. Miller, Kentaro Miuchi, Sahara Mohammed Prem Nazeer, Omar Moreno, Vasiliy Morozov, Frederic Mouton, Holger Mueller, Alexander Murphy, Russell Neilson, Tim Nelson, Christopher Neu, Yuri Nosochkov, Ciaran O'Hare, Noah Oblath, John Orrell, Jonathan Ouellet, Saori Pastore, Sebouh Paul, Maxim Perelstein, Annika Peter, Nguyen Phan, Nan Phinney, Michael Pivovaroff, Andrea Pocar, Maxim Pospelov, Josef Pradler, Paolo Privitera, Stefano Profumo, Mauro Raggi, Surjeet Rajendran, Nunzio Randazzo, Tor Raubenheimer, Christian Regenfus, Andrew Renshaw, Adam Ritz, Thomas Rizzo, Leslie Rosenberg, Andre Rubbia, Ben Rybolt, Tarek Saab, Benjamin R. Safdi, Elena Santopinto, Andrew Scarff, Michael Schneider, Philip Schuster, George Seidel, Hiroyuki Sekiya, Ilsoo Seong, Gabriele Simi, Valeria Sipala, Tracy Slatyer, Oren Slone, Peter F Smith, Jordan Smolinsky, Daniel Snowden-Ifft, Matthew Solt, Andrew Sonnenschein, Peter Sorensen, Neil Spooner, Brijesh Srivastava, Ion Stancu, Louis Strigari, Jan Strube, Alexander O. Sushkov, Matthew Szydagis, Philip Tanedo, David Tanner, Rex Tayloe, William Terrano, Jesse Thaler, Brooks Thomas, Brianna Thorpe, Thomas Thorpe, Javier Tiffenberg, Nhan Tran, Marco Trovato, Christopher Tully, Tony Tyson, Tanmay Vachaspati, Sven Vahsen, Karl van Bibber, Justin Vandenbroucke, Anthony Villano, Tomer Volansky, Guojian Wang, Thomas Ward, William Wester, Andrew Whitbeck, David A. Williams, Matthew Wing, Lindley Winslow, Bogdan Wojtsekhowski, Hai-Bo Yu, Shin-Shan Yu, Tien-Tien Yu, Xilin Zhang, Yue Zhao, Yi-Ming Zhong
    July 14, 2017 hep-ph, hep-ex, astro-ph.CO
    This white paper summarizes the workshop "U.S. Cosmic Visions: New Ideas in Dark Matter" held at University of Maryland on March 23-25, 2017.
  • The 6.8$\sigma$ anomaly in excited 8Be nuclear decays via internal pair creation is fit well by a new particle interpretation. In a previous analysis, we showed that a 17 MeV protophobic gauge boson provides a particle physics explanation of the anomaly consistent with all existing constraints. Here we begin with a review of the physics of internal pair creation in 8Be decays and the characteristics of the observed anomaly. To develop its particle interpretation, we provide an effective operator analysis for excited 8Be decays to particles with a variety of spins and parities and show that these considerations exclude simple models with scalar particles. We discuss the required couplings for a gauge boson to give the observed signal, highlighting the significant dependence on the precise mass of the boson and isospin mixing and breaking effects. We present anomaly-free extensions of the Standard Model that contain protophobic gauge bosons with the desired couplings to explain the 8Be anomaly. In the first model, the new force carrier is a U(1)B gauge boson that kinetically mixes with the photon; in the second model, it is a U(1)(B-L) gauge boson with a similar kinetic mixing. In both cases, the models predict relatively large charged lepton couplings ~ 0.001 that can resolve the discrepancy in the muon anomalous magnetic moment and are amenable to many experimental probes. The models also contain vectorlike leptons at the weak scale that may be accessible to near future LHC searches.
  • MSSM4G models, in which the minimal supersymmetric standard model is extended to include vector-like copies of standard model particles, are promising possibilities for weak-scale supersymmetry. In particular, two models, called QUE and QDEE, realize the major virtues of supersymmetry (naturalness consistent with the 125 GeV Higgs boson, gauge coupling unification, and thermal relic neutralino dark matter) without the need for fine-tuned relations between particle masses. We determine the implications of these models for dark matter and collider searches. The QUE and QDEE models revive the possibility of heavy Bino dark matter with mass in the range 300-700 GeV, which is not usually considered. Dark matter direct detection cross sections are typically below current limits, but are naturally expected above the neutrino floor and may be seen at next-generation experiments. Indirect detection prospects are bright at the Cherenkov Telescope Array, provided the 4th-generation leptons have mass above 350 GeV or decay to taus. In a completely complementary way, discovery prospects at the LHC are dim if the 4th-generation leptons are heavy or decay to taus, but are bright for 4th-generation leptons with masses below 350 GeV that decay either to electrons or to muons. We conclude that the combined set of direct detection, CTA, and LHC experiments will discover or exclude these MSSM4G models in the coming few years, assuming the Milky Way has an Einasto dark matter profile.
  • Recently a 6.8$\sigma$ anomaly has been reported in the opening angle and invariant mass distributions of $e^+ e^-$ pairs produced in $^8\text{Be}$ nuclear transitions. The data are explained by a 17 MeV vector gauge boson $X$ that is produced in the decay of an excited state to the ground state, $^8\text{Be}^* \to {}^8\text{Be} \, X$, and then decays through $X \to e^+ e^-$. The $X$ boson mediates a fifth force with a characteristic range of 12 fm and has milli-charged couplings to up and down quarks and electrons, and a proton coupling that is suppressed relative to neutrons. The protophobic $X$ boson may also alleviate the current 3.6$\sigma$ discrepancy between the predicted and measured values of the muon's anomalous magnetic moment.
  • We study the prospects for long-lived charged particle (LLCP) searches at current and future LHC runs and at a 100 TeV pp collider, using Drell-Yan slepton pair production as an example. Because momentum measurements become more challenging for very energetic particles, we carefully treat the expected momentum resolution. At the same time, a novel feature of 100 TeV collisions is the significant energy loss of energetic muons in detectors. We use this to help discriminate between muons and LLCPs. We find that the 14 TeV LHC with an integrated luminosity of 3 ab$^{-1}$ can probe LLCP slepton masses up to 1.2 TeV, and a 100 TeV pp collider with 3 ab$^{-1}$ can probe LLCP slepton masses up to 4 TeV, using time-of-flight measurements. These searches will have striking implications for dark matter, with the LHC definitively testing the possibility of slepton-neutralino co-annihilating WIMP dark matter, and with the LHC and future hadron colliders having a strong potential for discovering LLCPs in models with superWIMP dark matter.
  • We supplement the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with vector-like copies of standard model particles. Such 4th generation particles can raise the Higgs boson mass to the observed value without requiring very heavy superpartners, improving naturalness and the prospects for discovering supersymmetry at the LHC. Here we show that these new particles are also motivated cosmologically: in the MSSM, pure Bino dark matter typically overcloses the Universe, but 4th generation particles open up new annihilation channels, allowing Binos to have the correct thermal relic density without resonances or co-annihilation. We show that this can be done in a sizable region of parameter space while preserving gauge coupling unification and satisfying constraints from collider, Higgs, precision electroweak, and flavor physics.
  • We consider a simple supersymmetric hidden sector: pure SU(N) gauge theory. Dark matter is made up of hidden glueballinos with mass $m_X$ and hidden glueballs with mass near the confinement scale $\Lambda$. For $m_X \sim 1\,\text{TeV}$ and $\Lambda \sim 100\,\text{MeV}$, the glueballinos freeze out with the correct relic density and self-interact through glueball exchange to resolve small-scale structure puzzles. An immediate consequence is that the glueballino spectrum has a hyperfine splitting of order $\Lambda^2 / m_X \sim 10\,\text{keV}$. We show that the radiative decays of the excited state can explain the observed 3.5 keV X-ray line signal from clusters of galaxies, Andromeda, and the Milky Way.
  • There is strong evidence in favor of the idea that dark matter is self interacting, with the cross section-to-mass ratio $\sigma / m \sim 1\,\mathrm{cm^2/g} \sim 1\,\mathrm{barn/GeV}$. We show that viable models of dark matter with this large cross section are straightforwardly realized with non-Abelian hidden sectors. In the simplest of such models, the hidden sector is a pure gauge theory, and the dark matter is composed of hidden glueballs with a mass around $100\,\mathrm{MeV}$. Alternatively, the hidden sector may be a supersymmetric pure gauge theory with a $\sim 10\,\mathrm{TeV}$ gluino thermal relic. In this case, the dark matter is largely composed of glueballinos that strongly self interact through the exchange of light glueballs. We present a unified framework that realizes both of these possibilities in anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking, where, depending on a few model parameters, the dark matter may be composed of hidden glueballinos, hidden glueballs, or a mixture of the two. These models provide simple examples of multicomponent dark matter, have interesting implications for particle physics and cosmology, and include cases where a subdominant component of dark matter may be extremely strongly self interacting, with interesting astrophysical consequences.
  • In this report we summarize the many dark matter searches currently being pursued through four complementary approaches: direct detection, indirect detection, collider experiments, and astrophysical probes. The essential features of broad classes of experiments are described, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. The complementarity of the different dark matter searches is discussed qualitatively and illustrated quantitatively in two simple theoretical frameworks. Our primary conclusion is that the diversity of possible dark matter candidates requires a balanced program drawing from all four approaches.
  • In this Report we discuss the four complementary searches for the identity of dark matter: direct detection experiments that look for dark matter interacting in the lab, indirect detection experiments that connect lab signals to dark matter in our own and other galaxies, collider experiments that elucidate the particle properties of dark matter, and astrophysical probes sensitive to non-gravitational interactions of dark matter. The complementarity among the different dark matter searches is discussed qualitatively and illustrated quantitatively in several theoretical scenarios. Our primary conclusion is that the diversity of possible dark matter candidates requires a balanced program based on all four of those approaches.
  • In supersymmetric models with minimal particle content and without left-right squark mixing, the conventional wisdom is that the 125.6 GeV Higgs boson mass implies top squark masses of O(10) TeV, far beyond the reach of colliders. This conclusion is subject to significant theoretical uncertainties, however, and we provide evidence that it may be far too pessimistic. We evaluate the Higgs boson mass, including the dominant three-loop terms at O(\alpha_t \alpha_s^2), in currently viable models. For multi-TeV stops, the three-loop corrections can increase the Higgs boson mass by as much as 3 GeV and lower the required stop mass to 3 to 4 TeV, greatly improving prospects for supersymmetry discovery at the upcoming run of the LHC and its high-luminosity upgrade.
  • Isospin-violating dark matter (IVDM) generalizes the standard spin-independent scattering parameter space by introducing one additional parameter, the neutron-to-proton coupling ratio f_n/f_p. In IVDM the implications of direct detection experiments can be altered significantly. We review the motivations for considering IVDM and present benchmark models that illustrate some of the qualitatively different possibilities. IVDM strongly motivates the use of a variety of target nuclei in direct detection experiments.
  • We consider models of xenophobic dark matter, in which isospin-violating dark matter-nucleon interactions significantly degrade the response of xenon direct detection experiments. For models of near-maximal xenophobia, with neutron-to-proton coupling ratio $f_n / f_p \approx -0.64$, and dark matter mass near 8 GeV, the regions of interest for CoGeNT and CDMS-Si and the region of interest identified by Collar and Fields in CDMS-Ge data can be brought into agreement. This model may be tested in future direct, indirect, and collider searches. Interestingly, because the natural isotope abundance of xenon implies that xenophobia has its limits, we find that this xenophobic model may be probed in the near future by xenon experiments. Near-future data from the LHC and Fermi-LAT may also provide interesting alternative probes of xenophobic dark matter.
  • For decades, the unnaturalness of the weak scale has been the dominant problem motivating new particle physics, and weak-scale supersymmetry has been the dominant proposed solution. This paradigm is now being challenged by a wealth of experimental data. In this review, we begin by recalling the theoretical motivations for weak-scale supersymmetry, including the gauge hierarchy problem, grand unification, and WIMP dark matter, and their implications for superpartner masses. These are set against the leading constraints on supersymmetry from collider searches, the Higgs boson mass, and low-energy constraints on flavor and CP violation. We then critically examine attempts to quantify naturalness in supersymmetry, stressing the many subjective choices that impact the results both quantitatively and qualitatively. Finally, we survey various proposals for natural supersymmetric models, including effective supersymmetry, focus point supersymmetry, compressed supersymmetry, and R-parity-violating supersymmetry, and summarize their key features, current status, and implications for future experiments.
  • In the early years, cosmic rays contributed essentially to particle physics through the discovery of new particles. Will history repeat itself? As with the discovery of the charged pion, the recent discovery of a Higgs-like boson may portend a rich new set of particles within reach of current and near future experiments. These may be discovered and studied by cosmic rays through the indirect detection of dark matter.
  • Recent results from Higgs boson and supersymmetry searches at the Large Hadron Collider provide strong new motivations for supersymmetric theories with heavy superpartners. We reconsider focus point supersymmetry (FP SUSY), in which all squarks and sleptons may have multi-TeV masses without introducing fine-tuning in the weak scale with respect to variations in the fundamental SUSY-breaking parameters. We examine both FP SUSY and its familiar special case, the FP region of mSUGRA/CMSSM, and show that they are beautifully consistent with all particle, astroparticle, and cosmological data, including Higgs boson mass limits, null results from SUSY searches, electric dipole moments, b -> s gamma, B_s -> mu^+ mu^-, the thermal relic density of neutralinos, and dark matter searches. The observed deviation of the muon's anomalous magnetic moment from its standard model value may also be explained in FP SUSY, although not in the FP region of mSUGRA/CMSSM. In light of recent data, we advocate refined searches for FP SUSY and related scenarios with heavy squarks and sleptons, and we present a simplified parameter space to aid such analyses.
  • Recent indications of a 125 GeV Higgs boson are challenging for gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking (GMSB), since radiative contributions to the Higgs boson mass are not enhanced by significant stop mixing. This challenge should not be considered in isolation, however, as GMSB also generically suffers from two other problems: unsuppressed electric dipole moments and the absence of an attractive dark matter candidate. We show that all of these problems may be simultaneously solved by considering heavy superpartners, without extra fields or modified cosmology. Multi-TeV sfermions suppress the EDMs and raise the Higgs mass, and the dark matter problem is solved by Goldilocks cosmology, in which TeV neutralinos decay to GeV gravitinos that are simultaneously light enough to solve the flavor problem and heavy enough to be all of dark matter. The implications for collider searches and direct and indirect dark matter detection are sobering, but EDMs are expected near their current bounds, and the resulting non-thermal gravitino dark matter is necessarily warm, with testable cosmological implications.
  • We show that a 125 GeV Higgs boson and percent-level fine-tuning are simultaneously attainable in the MSSM, with no additional fields and supersymmetry breaking generated at the GUT scale. The Higgs mass is raised by large radiative contributions from top squarks with significant left-right mixing, and naturalness is preserved by the focus point mechanism with large $A$-terms, which suppresses large log-enhanced sensitivities to variations in the fundamental parameters. The focus point mechanism is independent of almost all supersymmetry-breaking parameters, but is predictive in the top sector, requiring the GUT-scale relation $m_{H_u}^2 : m_{\bar{U}_3}^2 : m_{Q_3}^2 : A_t^2 = 1 : 1+x - 3y : 1-x : 9y$, where $x$ and $y$ are constants. We derive this condition analytically and then investigate three representative models through detailed numerical analysis. The models generically predict heavy superpartners, but dark matter searches in the case of non-unified gaugino masses are promising, as are searches for top squarks and gluinos with top and bottom-rich cascade decays at the LHC. This framework may be viewed as a simple update to mSUGRA/CMSSM to accommodate both naturalness and current Higgs boson constraints, and provides an ideal framework for presenting new results from LHC searches.
  • We present a model with dark matter in an anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking hidden sector with a U(1)xU(1) gauge symmetry. The symmetries of the model stabilize the dark matter and forbid the introduction of new mass parameters. As a result, the thermal relic density is completely determined by the gravitino mass and dimensionless couplings. Assuming non-hierarchical couplings, the thermal relic density is ~ 0.1, independent of the dark matter's mass and interaction strength, realizing the WIMPless miracle. The model has several striking features. For particle physics, stability of the dark matter is completely consistent with R-parity violation in the visible sector, with implications for superpartner collider signatures; also the thermal relic's mass may be ~ 10 GeV or lighter, which is of interest given recent direct detection results. Interesting astrophysical signatures are dark matter self-interactions through a long-range force, and massless hidden photons and fermions that contribute to the number of relativistic degrees of freedom at BBN and CMB. The latter are particularly interesting, given current indications for extra degrees of freedom and near future results from the Planck observatory.
  • Searches for dark matter scattering off nuclei are typically compared assuming that the dark matter's spin-independent couplings are identical for protons and neutrons. This assumption is neither innocuous nor well motivated. We consider isospin-violating dark matter (IVDM) with one extra parameter, the ratio of neutron to proton couplings, and include the isotope distribution for each detector. For a single choice of the coupling ratio, the DAMA and CoGeNT signals are consistent with each other and with current XENON constraints, and they unambiguously predict near future signals at XENON and CRESST. We provide a quark-level realization of IVDM as WIMPless dark matter that is consistent with all collider and low-energy bounds.