• In such different domains as neurosciences, spin glasses, social science, economics and finance, large ensemble of interacting individuals following (mainstream) or opposing (hipsters) to the majority are ubiquitous. In these systems, interactions generally occur after specific delays associated to transport, transmission or integration of information. We investigate here the impact of anti-conformism combined to delays in the emergent dynamics of large populations of mainstreams and hipsters. To this purpose, we introduce a class of simple statistical systems of interacting agents composed of (i) mainstreams and anti-conformists in the presence of (ii) delays, possibly heterogeneous, in the transmission of information. In this simple model, each agent can be in one of two states, and can change state in continuous time with a rate depending on the state of others in the past. We express the thermodynamic limit of these systems as the number of agents diverge, and investigate the solutions of the limit equation, with a particular focus on synchronized oscillations induced by delayed interactions. We show that when hipsters are too slow in detecting the trends, they will consistently make the same choice, and realizing this too late, they will switch, all together to another state where they remain alike. Similar synchronizations arise when the impact of mainstreams on hipsters choices (and reciprocally) dominate the impact of other hipsters choices, and we show that these may emerge only when the randomness in the hipsters decisions is sufficiently large. Beyond the choice of the best suit to wear this winter, this study may have important implications in understanding synchronization of nerve cells, investment strategies in finance, or emergent dynamics in social science, domains in which delays of communication and the geometry of information accessibility are prominent.
  • In this manuscript we analyze the collective behavior of mean-field limits of large-scale, spatially extended stochastic neuronal networks with delays. Rigorously, the asymptotic regime of such systems is characterized by a very intricate stochastic delayed integro-differential McKean-Vlasov equation that remain impenetrable, leaving the stochastic collective dynamics of such networks poorly understood. In order to study these macroscopic dynamics, we analyze networks of firing-rate neurons, i.e. with linear intrinsic dynamics and sigmoidal interactions. In that case, we prove that the solution of the mean-field equation is Gaussian, hence characterized by its two first moments, and that these two quantities satisfy a set of coupled delayed integro-differential equations. These equations are similar to usual neural field equations, and incorporate noise levels as a parameter, allowing analysis of noise-induced transitions. We identify through bifurcation analysis several qualitative transitions due to noise in the mean-field limit. In particular, stabilization of spatially homogeneous solutions, synchronized oscillations, bumps, chaotic dynamics, wave or bump splitting are exhibited and arise from static or dynamic Turing-Hopf bifurcations. These surprising phenomena allow further exploring the role of noise in the nervous system.
  • This work continues the analysis of large deviations for randomly connected neural networks models of the brain. The originality of the model relies on the fact that the directed impact of one particle onto another depends on the state of both particles, and (ii) have random Gaussian amplitude with mean and variance scaling as the inverse of the network size. Similarly to the spatially extended case, we show that under sufficient regularity assumptions, the empirical measure satisfies a large-deviation principle with good rate function achieving its minimum at a unique probability measure, implying in particular its convergence in both averaged and quenched cases, as well as a propagation of chaos property (in the averaged case only). The class of model we consider notably includes a stochastic version of Kuramoto model with random connections.
  • In a series of two papers, we investigate the large deviations and asymptotic behavior of stochastic models of brain neural networks with random interaction coefficients. In this first paper, we take into account the spatial structure of the brain and consider (i) the presence of interaction delays that depend on the distance between cells and (ii) Gaussian random interaction amplitude whose mean and variance depend on the neurons positions and scale as the inverse of the network size. We show that the empirical measure satisfies a large-deviation principle with good rate function reaching its minimum at a unique spatially extended probability measure. This result implies averaged convergence of the empirical measure and propagation of chaos. The limit is characterized through complex non-Markovian implicit equation in which the network interaction term is replaced by a non-local Gaussian process whose statistics depend on the solution over the whole neural field.
  • This work continues the analysis of complex dynamics in a class of bidimensional nonlinear hybrid dynamical systems with resets modeling neuronal voltage dynamics with adaptation and spike emission. We show that these models can generically display a form of mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs), which are trajectories featuring an alternation of small oscillations with spikes or bursts (multiple consecutive spikes). The mechanism by which these are generated relies fundamentally on the hybrid structure of the flow: invariant manifolds of the continuous dynamics govern small oscillations, while discrete resets govern the emission of spikes or bursts, contrasting with classical MMO mechanisms in ordinary differential equations involving more than three dimensions and generally relying on a timescale separation. The decomposition of mechanisms reveals the geometrical origin of MMOs, allowing a relatively simple classification of points on the reset manifold associated to specific numbers of small oscillations. We show that the MMO pattern can be described through the study of orbits of a discrete adaptation map, which is singular as it features discrete discontinuities with unbounded left- and right-derivatives. We study orbits of the map via rotation theory for discontinuous circle maps and elucidate in detail complex behaviors arising in the case where MMOs display at most one small oscillation between each consecutive pair of spikes.
  • Critical states are sometimes identified experimentally through power-law statistics or universal scaling functions. We show here that such features naturally emerge from networks in self-sustained irregular regimes away from criticality. In these regimes, statistical physics theory of large interacting systems predict a regime where the nodes have independent and identically distributed dynamics. We thus investigated the statistics of a system in which units are replaced by independent stochastic surrogates, and found the same power-law statistics, indicating that these are not sufficient to establish criticality. We rather suggest that these are universal features of large-scale networks when considered macroscopically. These results put caution on the interpretation of scaling laws found in nature.
  • We consider the problem of the limit of bio-inspired spatially extended neuronal networks including an infinite number of neuronal types (space locations), with space-dependent propagation delays modeling neural fields. The propagation of chaos property is proved in this setting under mild assumptions on the neuronal dynamics, valid for most models used in neuroscience, in a mesoscopic limit, the neural-field limit, in which we can resolve the quite fine structure of the neuron's activity in space and where averaging effects occur. The mean-field equations obtained are of a new type: they take the form of well-posed infinite-dimensional delayed integro-differential equations with a nonlocal mean-field term and a singular spatio-temporal Brownian motion. We also show how these intricate equations can be used in practice to uncover mathematically the precise mesoscopic dynamics of the neural field in a particular model where the mean-field equations exactly reduce to deterministic nonlinear delayed integro-differential equations. These results have several theoretical implications in neuroscience we review in the discussion.
  • In the past 20 years, the study of real eigenvalues of non-symmetric real random matrices has seen important progress. Notwithstanding, central questions still remain open, such as the characterization of their asymptotic statistics and the universality thereof. In this letter we show that for a wide class of matrices, the number $k_n$ of real eigenvalues of a matrix of size $n$ is asymptotically Gaussian with mean $\bar k_n=\mathcal{O}(\sqrt{n})$ and variance $\bar k_n(2-\sqrt{2})$. Moreover, we show that the limit distribution of real eigenvalues undergoes a transition between bimodal for $k_n=o(\sqrt{n})$ to unimodal for $k_n=\mathcal{O}(n)$, with a uniform distribution at the transition. We predict theoretically these behaviours in the Ginibre ensemble using a log-gas approach, and show numerically that they hold for a wide range of random matrices with independent entries beyond the universality class of the circular law.
  • Realistic networks display heterogeneous transmission delays. We analyze here the limits of large stochastic multi-populations networks with stochastic coupling and random interconnection delays. We show that depending on the nature of the delays distributions, a quenched or averaged propagation of chaos takes place in these networks, and that the network equations converge towards a delayed McKean-Vlasov equation with distributed delays. Our approach is mostly fitted to neuroscience applications. We instantiate in particular a classical neuronal model, the Wilson and Cowan system, and show that the obtained limit equations have Gaussian solutions whose mean and standard deviation satisfy a closed set of coupled delay differential equations in which the distribution of delays and the noise levels appear as parameters. This allows to uncover precisely the effects of noise, delays and coupling on the dynamics of such heterogeneous networks, in particular their role in the emergence of synchronized oscillations. We show in several examples that not only the averaged delay, but also the dispersion, govern the dynamics of such networks.
  • We consider the ensemble of Real Ginibre matrices with a positive fraction $\alpha>0$ of real eigenvalues. We demonstrate a large deviations principle for the joint eigenvalue density of such matrices and we introduce a two phase log-gas whose stationary distribution coincides with the spectral measure of the ensemble. Using these tools we provide an asymptotic expansion for the probability $p^n_{\alpha n}$ that an $n\times n$ Ginibre matrix has $k=\alpha n$ real eigenvalues and we characterize the spectral measures of these matrices.
  • Motivated by the dynamics of neuronal responses, we analyze the dynamics of the Fitzhugh-Nagumo slow-fast system with delayed self-coupling. This system provides a canonical example of a canard explosion for sufficiently small delays. Beyond this regime, delays significantly enrich the dynamics, leading to mixed-mode oscillations, bursting and chaos. These behaviors emerge from a delay-induced subcritical Bogdanov-Takens instability arising at the fold points of the S-shaped critical manifold. Underlying the transition from canard-induced to delay-induced dynamics is an abrupt switch in the nature of the Hopf bifurcation.
  • Emotional disorders and psychological flourishing are the result of complex interactions between positive and negative affects that depend on external events and the subject's internal representations. Based on psychological data, we mathematically model the dynamical balance between positive and negative affects as a function of the response to external positive and negative events. This modeling allows the investigation of the relative impact of two leading forms of therapy on affect balance. The model uses a delay differential equation to analytically study the complete bifurcation diagram of the system. We compare the results of the model to psychological data on a single, recurrently depressed patient that was administered the two types of therapies considered (viz., coping-focused vs. affect-focused). The model leads to the prediction that stabilization at a normal state may rely on evaluating one's emotional state through an historical ongoing emotional state rather than in a narrow present window. The simple mathematical model proposed here offers a theoretically grounded quantitative framework for investigating the temporal process of change and parameters of resilience to relapse.
  • In this article, we address the absorption properties of a class of stochastic differ- ential equations around singular points where both the drift and diffusion functions vanish. According to the H\"older coefficient alpha of the diffusion function around the singular point, we identify different regimes. Stability of the absorbing state, large deviations for the absorption time, existence of stationary or quasi-stationary distributions are discussed. In particular, we show that quasi-stationary distributions only exist for alpha < 3/4, and for alpha in the interval (3/4, 1), no quasi-stationary distribution is found and numerical simulations tend to show that the process conditioned on not being absorbed initiates an almost sure exponential convergence towards the absorbing state (as is demonstrated to be true for alpha = 1). Applications of these results to stochastic bifurcations are discussed.
  • The collective behavior of cortical neurons is strongly affected by the presence of noise at the level of individual cells. In order to study these phenomena in large-scale assemblies of neurons, we consider networks of firing-rate neurons with linear intrinsic dynamics and nonlinear coupling, belonging to a few types of cell populations and receiving noisy currents. Asymptotic equations as the number of neurons tends to infinity (mean field equations) are rigorously derived based on a probabilistic approach. These equations are implicit on the probability distribution of the solutions which generally makes their direct analysis difficult. However, in our case, the solutions are Gaussian, and their moments satisfy a closed system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs), which are much easier to study than the original stochastic network equations, and the statistics of the empirical process uniformly converge towards the solutions of these ODEs. Based on this description, we analytically and numerically study the influence of noise on the collective behaviors, and compare these asymptotic regimes to simulations of the network. We observe that the mean field equations provide an accurate description of the solutions of the network equations for network sizes as small as a few hundreds of neurons. In particular, we observe that the level of noise in the system qualitatively modifies its collective behavior, producing for instance synchronized oscillations of the whole network, desynchronization of oscillating regimes, and stabilization or destabilization of stationary solutions. These results shed a new light on the role of noise in shaping collective dynamics of neurons, and gives us clues for understanding similar phenomena observed in biological networks.
  • We investigate existence and uniqueness of solutions of a McKean-Vlasov evolution PDE representing the macroscopic behaviour of interacting Fitzhugh-Nagumo neurons. This equation is hypoelliptic, nonlocal and has unbounded coefficients. We prove existence of a solution to the evolution equation and non trivial stationary solutions. Moreover, we demonstrate uniqueness of the stationary solution in the weakly nonlinear regime. Eventually, using a semigroup factorisation method, we show exponential nonlinear stability in the small connectivity regime.
  • We introduce and analyze $d$ dimensional Coulomb gases with random charge distribution and general external confining potential. We show that these gases satisfy a large deviations principle. The analysis of the minima of the rate function (which is the leading term of the energy) reveals that at equilibrium, the particle distribution is a generalized circular law (i.e. with spherical support but non-necessarily uniform distribution). In the classical electrostatic external potential, there are infinitely many minimizers of the rate function. The most likely macroscopic configuration is a disordered distribution in which particles are uniformly distributed (for $d=2$, the circular law), and charges are independent of the positions of the particles. General charge-dependent confining potentials unfold this degenerate situation: in contrast, the particle density is not uniform, and particles spontaneously organize according to their charge. In that picture the classical electrostatic potential appears as a transition at which order is lost. Sub-leading terms of the energy are derived: we show that these are related to an operator, generalizing the Coulomb renormalized energy, which incorporates the heterogeneous nature of the charges. This heterogeneous renormalized energy informs us about the microscopic arrangements of the particles, which are non-standard, strongly depending on the charges, and include progressive and irregular lattices.
  • Networks of the brain are composed of a very large number of neurons connected through a random graph and interacting after random delays that both depend on the anatomical distance between cells. In order to comprehend the role of these random architectures on the dynamics of such networks, we analyze the mesoscopic and macroscopic limits of networks with random correlated connectivity weights and delays. We address both averaged and quenched limits, and show propagation of chaos and convergence to a complex integral McKean-Vlasov equations with distributed delays. We then instantiate a completely solvable model illustrating the role of such random architectures in the emerging macroscopic activity. We particularly focus on the role of connectivity levels in the emergence of periodic solutions.
  • The cortex is a very large network characterized by a complex connectivity including at least two scales: a microscopic scale at which the interconnections are non-specific and very dense, while macroscopic connectivity patterns connecting different regions of the brain at larger scale are extremely sparse. This motivates to analyze the behavior of networks with multiscale coupling, in which a neuron is connected to its $v(N)$ nearest-neighbors where $v(N)=o(N)$, and in which the probability of macroscopic connection between two neurons vanishes. These are called singular multi-scale connectivity patterns. We introduce a class of such networks and derive their continuum limit. We show convergence in law and propagation of chaos in the thermodynamic limit. The limit equation obtained is an intricate non-local McKean-Vlasov equation with delays which is universal with respect to the type of micro-circuits and macro-circuits involved.
  • Complex systems, and in particular random neural networks, are often described by randomly interacting dynamical systems with no specific symmetry. In that context, characterizing the number of relevant directions necessitates fine estimates on the Ginibre ensemble. In this Letter, we compute analytically the probability distribution of the number of eigenvalues $N_R$ with modulus greater than $R$ (the index) of a large $N\times N$ random matrix in the real or complex Ginibre ensemble. We show that the fraction $N_R/N=p$ has a distribution scaling as $\exp(-\beta N^2 \psi_R(p))$ with $\beta=1$ (respectively $\beta=1/2$) for the complex (resp. real) Ginibre ensemble. For any $p\in[0,1]$, the equilibrium spectral densities as well as the rate function $\psi_R(p)$ are explicitly derived. This function displays a third order phase transition at the critical (minimum) value $p^*_R=1-R^2$, associated to a phase transition of the Coulomb gas. We deduce that, in the central regime, the fluctuations of the index $N_R$ around its typical value $p^*_R N$ scale as $N^{1/3}$.
  • Neural field equations are integro-differential systems describing the macroscopic activity of spatially extended pieces of cortex. In such cortical assemblies, the propagation of information and the transmission machinery induce communication delays, due to the transport of information (propagation delays) and to the synaptic machinery (constant delays). We investigate the role of these delays on the formation of structured spatiotemporal patterns for these systems in arbitrary dimensions. We focus on localized activity, either induced by the presence of a localized stimulus (pulses) or by transitions between two levels of activity (fronts). Linear stability analysis allows to reveal the existence of Hopf bifurcation curves induced by the delays, along different modes that may be symmetric or asymmetric. We show that instabilities strongly depend on the dimension, and in particular may exhibit transversal instabilities along invariant directions. These instabilities yield pulsatile localized activity, and depending on the symmetry of the destabilized modes, either produce spatiotemporal breathing or sloshing patterns.
  • Characterizing the in uence of network properties on the global emerging behavior of interacting elements constitutes a central question in many areas, from physical to social sciences. In this article we study a primary model of disordered neuronal networks with excitatory-inhibitory structure and balance constraints. We show how the interplay between structure and disorder in the connectivity leads to a universal transition from trivial to synchronized stationary or periodic states. This transition cannot be explained only through the analysis of the spectral density of the connectivity matrix. We provide a low dimensional approximation that shows the role of both the structure and disorder in the dynamics.
  • Random neural networks are dynamical descriptions of randomly interconnected neural units. These show a phase transition to chaos as a disorder parameter is increased. The microscopic mechanisms underlying this phase transition are unknown, and similarly to spin-glasses, shall be fundamentally related to the behavior of the system. In this Letter we investigate the explosion of complexity arising near that phase transition. We show that the mean number of equilibria undergoes a sharp transition from one equilibrium to a very large number scaling exponentially with the dimension on the system. Near criticality, we compute the exponential rate of divergence, called topological complexity. Strikingly, we show that it behaves exactly as the maximal Lyapunov exponent, a classical measure of dynamical complexity. This relationship unravels a microscopic mechanism leading to chaos which we further demonstrate on a simpler class of disordered systems, suggesting a deep and underexplored link between topological and dynamical complexity.
  • We investigate the dynamics of large stochastic networks with different timescales and nonlinear mean-field interactions. After deriving the limit equations for a general class of network models, we apply our results to the celebrated Wilson-Cowan system with two populations with or without slow adaptation, paradigmatic example of nonlinear mean-field network. This system has the property that the dynamics of the mean of the solution exactly satisfies an ODE. This reduction allows to show that in the mean-field limit and in multiple populations with multiple timescales, noise induces canard explosions and Mixed-Mode Oscillations on the mean of the solution. This sheds new light on the qualitative effects of noise and sensitivity to precise noise values in large stochastic networks. We further investigate finite-sized networks and show that systematic differences with the mean-field limits arise in bistable regimes (where random switches between different attractors occur) or in mixed-mode oscillations, were the finite-size effects induce early jumps due to the sensitivity of the attractor.
  • We analyze the macroscopic behavior of multi-populations randomly connected neural networks with interaction delays. Similar to cases occurring in spin glasses, we show that the sequences of empirical measures satisfy a large deviation principle, and converge towards a self-consistent non-Markovian process. The proof differs in that we are working in infinite-dimensional spaces (interaction delays), non-centered interactions and multiple cell types. The limit equation is qualitatively analyzed, and we identify a number of phase transitions in such systems upon changes in delays, connectivity patterns and dispersion, particularly focusing on the emergence of non-equilibrium states involving synchronized oscillations.
  • At functional scales, cortical behavior results from the complex interplay of a large number of excitable cells operating in noisy environments. Such systems resist to mathematical analysis, and computational neurosciences have largely relied on heuristic partial (and partially justified) macroscopic models, which successfully reproduced a number of relevant phenomena. The relationship between these macroscopic models and the spiking noisy dynamics of the underlying cells has since then been a great endeavor. Based on recent mean-field reductions for such spiking neurons, we present here {a principled reduction of large biologically plausible neuronal networks to firing-rate models, providing a rigorous} relationship between the macroscopic activity of populations of spiking neurons and popular macroscopic models, under a few assumptions (mainly linearity of the synapses). {The reduced model we derive consists of simple, low-dimensional ordinary differential equations with} parameters and {nonlinearities derived from} the underlying properties of the cells, and in particular the noise level. {These simple reduced models are shown to reproduce accurately the dynamics of large networks in numerical simulations}. Appropriate parameters and functions are made available {online} for different models of neurons: McKean, Fitzhugh-Nagumo and Hodgkin-Huxley models.