• CleverHans is a software library that provides standardized reference implementations of adversarial example construction techniques and adversarial training. The library may be used to develop more robust machine learning models and to provide standardized benchmarks of models' performance in the adversarial setting. Benchmarks constructed without a standardized implementation of adversarial example construction are not comparable to each other, because a good result may indicate a robust model or it may merely indicate a weak implementation of the adversarial example construction procedure. This technical report is structured as follows. Section 1 provides an overview of adversarial examples in machine learning and of the CleverHans software. Section 2 presents the core functionalities of the library: namely the attacks based on adversarial examples and defenses to improve the robustness of machine learning models to these attacks. Section 3 describes how to report benchmark results using the library. Section 4 describes the versioning system.
  • This paper investigates recently proposed approaches for defending against adversarial examples and evaluating adversarial robustness. The existence of adversarial examples in trained neural networks reflects the fact that expected risk alone does not capture the model's performance against worst-case inputs. We motivate the use of adversarial risk as an objective, although it cannot easily be computed exactly. We then frame commonly used attacks and evaluation metrics as defining a tractable surrogate objective to the true adversarial risk. This suggests that models may be obscured to adversaries, by optimizing this surrogate rather than the true adversarial risk. We demonstrate that this is a significant problem in practice by repurposing gradient-free optimization techniques into adversarial attacks, which we use to decrease the accuracy of several recently proposed defenses to near zero. Our hope is that our formulations and results will help researchers to develop more powerful defenses.
  • The problem of automatically generating a computer program from some specification has been studied since the early days of AI. Recently, two competing approaches for automatic program learning have received significant attention: (1) neural program synthesis, where a neural network is conditioned on input/output (I/O) examples and learns to generate a program, and (2) neural program induction, where a neural network generates new outputs directly using a latent program representation. Here, for the first time, we directly compare both approaches on a large-scale, real-world learning task. We additionally contrast to rule-based program synthesis, which uses hand-crafted semantics to guide the program generation. Our neural models use a modified attention RNN to allow encoding of variable-sized sets of I/O pairs. Our best synthesis model achieves 92% accuracy on a real-world test set, compared to the 34% accuracy of the previous best neural synthesis approach. The synthesis model also outperforms a comparable induction model on this task, but we more importantly demonstrate that the strength of each approach is highly dependent on the evaluation metric and end-user application. Finally, we show that we can train our neural models to remain very robust to the type of noise expected in real-world data (e.g., typos), while a highly-engineered rule-based system fails entirely.