• A fundamental difference between antiferromagnets and ferromagnets is the lack of linear coupling to a uniform magnetic field due to the staggered order parameter. Such coupling is possible via the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction but at the expense of reduced antiferromagnetic (AFM) susceptibility due to the canting-induced spin anisotropy. We solve this long-standing problem with a top-down approach that utilizes spin-orbit coupling in the presence of a hidden SU(2) symmetry. We demonstrate giant AFM responses to sub-Tesla external fields by exploiting the extremely strong two-dimensional critical fluctuations preserved under a symmetry-invariant exchange anisotropy, which is built into a square-lattice artificially synthesized as a superlattice of SrIrO3 and SrTiO3. The observed field-induced logarithmic increase of the ordering temperature enables highly efficient control of the AFM order. As antiferromagnets promise to afford switching speed and storage security far beyond ferromagnets, our symmetry-invariant approach unleashes the great potential of functional antiferromagnets.
  • We report on the tuning of magnetic interactions in superlattices composed of single and bilayer SrIrO$_3$ inter-spaced with SrTiO$_3$. Magnetic scattering shows predominately $c$-axis antiferromagnetic orientation of the magnetic moments for the bilayer justifying these systems as viable artificial analogues of the bulk Ruddlesden-Popper series iridates. Magnon gaps are observed in both superlattices, with the magnitude of the gap in the bilayer being reduced to nearly half that in its bulk structural analogue, Sr$_3$Ir$_2$O$_7$. We assign this to modifications in the anisotropic exchange driven by bending of the $c$-axis Ir-O-Ir bond and subsequent local environment changes, as detected by x-ray diffraction and modeled using spin wave theory. These findings explain how even subtle structural modulations driven by heterostructuring in iridates are leveraged by spin orbit coupling to drive large changes in the magnetic interactions.
  • Searching for new functionality in next generation electronic devices is a principal driver of material physics research. Multiferroics simultaneously exhibit electric and magnetic order parameters that may be coupled through magnetoelectric (ME) effects. In single-phase materials the ME effect arises from one of three known mechanisms: inverse Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (IDM) interaction, spin dependent ligand-metal (p-d) orbital hybridization, and exchange striction. However, the coupling among these mechanisms remains largely unexplored despite envisioned potential capabilities. Here, we present cooperative tuning between both IDM interaction and p-d hybridization that leads to discrete ME states in Ba0.5Sr2.5Co2Fe24O41. In-situ x-ray diffraction exposes the microscopic interplay between these two mechanisms, marked by a unique ME susceptibility upon electric and magnetic fields. The entangled multi-ME coupling phenomenon observed in this room-temperature ME hexaferrite offers a pathway to novel functional control for ME device applications.
  • Elastic strain is potentially an important approach in tuning the properties of the improperly multiferroic hexagonal ferrites, the details of which have however been elusive due to the experimental difficulties. Employing the method of restrained thermal expansion, we have studied the effect of isothermal biaxial strain in the basal plane of h-LuFeO3 (001) films. The results indicate that a compressive biaxial strain significantly enhances the ferrodistortion, and the effect is larger at higher temperatures. The compressive biaxial strain and the enhanced ferrodistortion together, cause an increase in the electric polarization and a reduction in the canting of the weak ferromagnetic moments in h-LuFeO3, according to our first principle calculations. These findings are important for understanding the strain effect as well as the coupling between the lattice and the improper multiferroicity in h-LuFeO3. The experimental elucidation of the strain effect in h-LuFeO3 films also suggests that the restrained thermal expansion can be a viable method to unravel the strain effect in many other epitaxial thin film materials.
  • Magnetic anisotropy (MA) is one of the most important material properties for modern spintronic devices. Conventional manipulation of the intrinsic MA, i.e. magnetocrystalline anisotropy (MCA), typically depends upon crystal symmetry. Extrinsic control over the MA is usually achieved by introducing shape anisotropy or exchange bias from another magnetically ordered material. Here we demonstrate a pathway to manipulate MA of 3d transition metal oxides (TMOs) by digitally inserting non-magnetic 5d TMOs with pronounced spin-orbit coupling (SOC). High quality superlattices comprised of ferromagnetic La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 (LSMO) and paramagnetic SrIrO3 (SIO) are synthesized with the precise control of thickness at atomic scale. Magnetic easy axis reorientation is observed by controlling the dimensionality of SIO, mediated through the emergence of a novel spin-orbit state within the nominally paramagnetic SIO.
  • Electronic structures for the conduction bands of both hexagonal and orthorhombic LuFeO3 thin films have been measured using x-ray absorption spectroscopy at oxygen K (O K) edge. Dramatic differences in both the spectra shape and the linear dichroism are observed. These differences in the spectra can be explained using the differences in crystal field splitting of the metal (Fe and Lu) electronic states and the differences in O 2p-Fe 3d and O 2p-Lu 5d hybridizations. While the oxidation states has not changed, the spectra are sensitive to the changes in the local environments of the Fe3+ and Lu3+ sites in the hexagonal and orthorhombic structures. Using the crystal-field splitting and the hybridizations that are extracted from the measured electronic structures and the structural distortion information, we derived the occupancies of the spin minority states in Fe3+, which are non-zero and uneven. The single ion anisotropy on Fe3+ sites is found to originate from these uneven occupancies of the spin minority states via spin-orbit coupling in LuFeO3.
  • We present evidence that the metal-insulator transition (MIT) in a tensile strained NdNiO3 (NNO) film is facilitated by a redistribution of electronic density and neither requires Ni charge disproportionation nor symmetry change [1, 2]. Given epitaxial tensile strain in thin NNO films induces preferential occupancy of the $e_g$ $d_{x^2-y^2}$ orbital ($s_{3z^2-r^2}$) we propose the larger transfer integral of this orbital state with the O 2p mediates a redistribution of electronic density from the Ni atom. A decrease in Ni $d_{x^2-y^2}$ orbital occupation is directly observed by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering below the MIT temperature. Furthermore, an increase in Nd charge occupancy is measured by x-ray absorption at the Nd L3 edge. Both spin-orbit coupling and crystal field effects combine to break the degeneracy of the Nd 5d states shifting the energy of the Nd $e_g$ $d_{x^2-y^2}$ orbital towards the Fermi level allowing the A site to become an active acceptor during the MI transition. This work identifies the relocation of electrons from the Ni 3d to the Nd 5d orbitals across the MIT. We propose the insulating gap opens between the Ni 3d and O 2p resulting from Ni 3d electron localization mediated by charge loss. The transition seems neither purely Mott-Hubbard nor simple charge transfer.
  • Heisenberg interactions are ubiquitous in magnetic materials and have been prevailing in modeling and designing quantum magnets. Bond-directional interactions offer a novel alternative to Heisenberg exchange and provide the building blocks of the Kitaev model, which has a quantum spin liquid (QSL) as its exact ground state. Honeycomb iridates, A2IrO3 (A=Na,Li), offer potential realizations of the Kitaev model, and their reported magnetic behaviors may be interpreted within the Kitaev framework. However, the extent of their relevance to the Kitaev model remains unclear, as evidence for bond-directional interactions remains indirect or conjectural. Here, we present direct evidence for dominant bond-directional interactions in antiferromagnetic Na2IrO3 and show that they lead to strong magnetic frustration. Diffuse magnetic x-ray scattering reveals broken spin-rotational symmetry even above Neel temperature, with the three spin components exhibiting nano-scale correlations along distinct crystallographic directions. This spin-space and real-space entanglement directly manifests the bond-directional interactions, provides the missing link to Kitaev physics in honeycomb iridates, and establishes a new design strategy toward frustrated magnetism.
  • Using combined theoretical and experimental approaches, we studied the structural and electronic origin of the magnetic structure in hexagonal LuFeO$_3$. Besides showing the strong exchange coupling that is consistent with the high magnetic ordering temperature, the previously observed spin reorientation transition is explained by the theoretically calculated magnetic phase diagram. The structural origin of this spin reorientation that is responsible for the appearance of spontaneous magnetization, is identified by theory and verified by x-ray diffraction and absorption experiments.
  • First order phase transitions occur discretely from one state to another, however they often display continuous behavior. To understand this nature, it is essential to probe how the emergent phase nucleates, interacts and evolves with the initial phase across the transition at microscopic scales. Here, the prototypical first-order magneto-structural transition in FeRh is used to investigate these phenomena. We find that the temperature evolution of the final phase exhibits critical behavior. Furthermore, a difference between the structure and magnetic transition temperatures reveals a novel intermediate phase created from the interface between the initial and nucleated final states. This emergent phase, characterized by its lack of spin order due to the competition between the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic interactions, leads to suppression of the dynamic aspect of the transition, generating a static mixed-phase-morphology. Understanding and controlling the transition process at this spatial scale is critical to optimizing functional device capabilities.
  • Neutron and synchrotron resonant X-ray magnetic scattering (RXMS) complemented by heat capacity and resistivity measurements reveal the evolution of the magnetic structures of Fe and Ce sublattices in single crystal CeFeAsO. The RXMS of magnetic reflections at the Ce $L_{\rm II}$-edge shows a magnetic transition that is specific to the Ce antiferromagnetic long-range ordering at $T_\texttt{Ce}\approx$ 4 K with short-range Ce ordering above $T_\texttt{Ce}$, whereas neutron diffraction measurements of a few magnetic reflections indicate a transition at $T^{*}\approx$ 12 K with unusual order parameter. Detailed order parameter measurements on several magnetic reflections by neutrons show a weak anomaly at 4 K which we associate with the Ce ordering. The successive transitions at $T_\texttt{Ce}$ and $T^{*}$ can also be clearly identified by two anomalies in heat capacity and resistivity measurements. The higher transition temperature at $T^{*}\approx$ 12 K is mainly ascribed to Fe spin reorientation transition, below which Fe spins rotate uniformly and gradually in the \textit{ab} plane. The Fe spin reorientation transition and short-range Ce ordering above $T_\texttt{Ce}$ reflect the strong Fe-Ce couplings prior to long-range ordering of the Ce. The evolution of the intricate magnetic structures in CeFeAsO going through $T^{*}$ and $T_\texttt{Ce}$ is proposed.
  • The interplay between structure, magnetism and superconductivity in single crystal Ba(Fe$_{1-x}$Co$_{x}$)$_{2}$As$_{2}$ (x=0.047) has been studied using high-resolution X-ray diffraction by monitoring charge Bragg reflections in each twin domain separately. The emergence of the superconducting state is correlated with the suppression of the orthorhombic distortion around \emph{T}$_\texttt{C}$, exhibiting competition between orthorhombicity and superconductivity. Above \emph{T}$_\texttt{S}$, the in-plane charge correlation length increases with the decrease of temperature, possibly induced by nematic fluctuations in the paramagnetic tetragonal phase. Upon cooling, anomalies in the in-plane charge correlation lengths along $a$ ($\xi_{a}$) and $b$ axes ($\xi_{b}$) are observed at \emph{T}$_\texttt{S}$ and also at \emph{T}$_\texttt{N}$ indicative of strong magnetoelastic coupling. The in-plane charge correlation lengths are found to exhibit anisotropic behavior along and perpendicular to the in-plane component of stripe-type AFM wave vector (101)$_{\rm O}$ below around \emph{T}$_\texttt{N}$. The temperature dependence of the out-of-plane charge correlation length shows a single anomaly at \emph{T}$_\texttt{N}$, reflecting the connection between Fe-As distance and Fe local moment. The origin of the anisotropic in-plane charge correlation lengths $\xi_{a}$ and $\xi_{b}$ is discussed on the basis of the antiphase magnetic domains and their dynamic fluctuations.
  • Microscopic structural instabilities of EuTiO3 single crystal were investigated by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Antiferrodistortive (AFD) oxygen octahedral rotational order was observed alongside Ti derived antiferroelectric (AFE) distortions. The competition between the two instabilities is reconciled through a cooperatively modulated structure allowing both to coexist. The electric and magnetic field effect on the modulated AFD order shows that the origin of large magnetoelectric coupling is based upon the dynamic equilibrium between the AFD - antiferromagnetic interactions versus the electric polarization - ferromagnetic interactions.