• This work shows that the majorization of photon distributions is related to the runtime of classically simulating multimode passive linear optics, which explains one aspect of the boson sampling hardness. A Shur-concave quantity which we name the \emph{Boltzmann entropy of elementary quantum complexity} ($S_B^q$) is introduced to present some quantitative analysis of the relation between the majorization and the classical runtime for simulating linear optics. We compare $S_B^q$ with two quantities that are important criteria for understanding the computational cost of the photon scattering process, $\mathcal{T}$ (the runtime for the classical simulation of linear optics) and $\mathcal{E}$ (the additive error bound for an approximated amplitude estimator). First, for all the known algorithms for computing the permanents of matrices with repeated rows and columns, the runtime $\mathcal{T}$ becomes shorter as the input and output distribution vectors are more majorized. Second, the error bound $\mathcal{E}$ decreases as the majorization difference of input and output states increases. We expect that our current results would help in understanding the feature of linear optical networks from the perspective of quantum computation.
  • Boson sampling (BS) is a multimode linear optical problem that is expected to be intractable on classical computers. It was recently suggested that molecular vibronic spectroscopy (MVS) is computationally as complex as BS. In this review, we discuss the correspondence relation between BS and MVS and briefly introduce the experimental demonstrations of the molecular spectroscopic process using quantum devices. The similarity of the two theories results in another BS setup, which is called "vibronic BS". The hierarchical structure of vibronic BS, which includes the original BS and other Gaussian BS, is also explained.
  • A fundamental question in linear optical quantum computing is to understand the origin of the quantum supremacy in the physical system. It is found that the multimode linear optical transition amplitudes are calculated through the permanents of transition operator matrices, which is a hard problem for classical simulations (boson sampling problem). We can understand this problem by considering a quantum measure that directly determines the runtime for computing the transition amplitudes. In this paper, we suggest a quantum measure named "Fock state concurrence sum" $C_S$, which is the summation over all the members of "the generalized Fock state concurrence" (a measure analogous to the generalized concurrences of entanglement and coherence). By introducing generalized algorithms for computing the transition amplitudes of the Fock state boson sampling with an arbitrary number of photons per mode, we show that the minimal classical runtime for all the known algorithms directly depends on $C_S$. Therefore, we can state that \emph{the Fock state concurrence sum $C_S$ behaves as a collective measure that controls the computational complexity of Fock state BS}. We expect that our observation on the role of the Fock state concurrence in the generalized algorithm for permanents would provide a unified viewpoint to interpret the quantum computing power of linear optics.
  • We study the impact of experimental imperfections on a recently proposed protocol for performing quantum simulations of vibronic spectroscopy. Specifically, we propose a method for quantifying the impact of these imperfections, optimizing an experiment to account for them, and benchmarking the results against a classical simulation method. We illustrate our findings using a proof of principle experimental simulation of part of the vibronic spectrum of tropolone. Our findings will inform the design of future experiments aiming to simulate the spectra of large molecules beyond the reach of current classical computers.
  • We show that the Dynamical Casimir Effect (DCE), realized on two multimode coplanar waveguide resonators, implements a gaussian boson sampler (GBS). The appropriate choice of the mirror acceleration that couples both resonators translates into the desired initial gaussian state and many-boson interference in a boson sampling network. In particular, we show that the proposed quantum simulator naturally performs a classically hard task, known as scattershot boson sampling. Our result unveils an unprecedented computational power of DCE, and paves the way for using DCE as a resource for quantum simulation.
  • When existing, cumulants can provide valuable information about a given distribution and can in principle be used to either fully reconstruct or approximate the parent distribution function. A previously reported cumulant expansion approach for Franck-Condon profiles [Faraday Discuss., 150, 363 (2011)] is extended to describe also the profiles of vibronic transitions that are weakly allowed or forbidden in the Franck-Condon approximation (non-Condon profiles). In the harmonic approximation the cumulants of the vibronic spectral profile can be evaluated analytically and numerically with a coherent state-based generating function that accounts for the Duschinsky effect. As illustration, the one-photon $1 ^{1}\mathrm{A_{g}}\rightarrow1 ^{1}\mathrm{B_{2u}}$ UV absorption spectrum of benzene in the electric dipole and (linear) Herzberg-Teller approximation is presented herein for zero Kelvin and finite temperatures.
  • Molecular vibroic spectroscopy, where the transitions involve non-trivial Bosonic correlation due to the Duschinsky Rotation, is strongly believed to be in a similar complexity class as Boson Sampling. At finite temperature, the problem is represented as a Boson Sampling experiment with correlated Gaussian input states. This molecular problem with temperature effect is intimately related to the various versions of Boson Sampling sharing the similar computational complexity. Here we provide a full description to this relation in the context of Gaussian Boson Sampling. We find a hierarchical structure, which illustrates the relationship among various Boson Sampling schemes. Specifically, we show that every instance of Gaussian Boson Sampling with an initial correlation can be simulated by an instance of Gaussian Boson Sampling without initial correlation, with only a polynomial overhead. Since every Gaussian state is associated with a thermal state, our result implies that every sampling problem in molecular vibronic transitions, at any temperature, can be simulated by Gaussian Boson Sampling associated with a product of vacuum modes. We refer such a generalized Gaussian Boson Sampling motivated by the molecular sampling problem as Vibronic Boson Sampling.
  • Molecules are the most demanding quantum systems to be simulated by quantum computers because of their complexity and the emergent role of quantum nature. The recent theoretical proposal of Huh et al. (Nature Photon., 9, 615 (2015)) showed that a multi-photon network with a Gaussian input state can simulate a molecular spectroscopic process. Here, we report the first experimental demonstration of molecular vibrational spectroscopy of SO$_{2}$ with a trapped-ion system. In our realization, the molecular scattering operation is decomposed to a series of elementary quantum optical operations, which are implemented through Raman laser beams, resulting in a multimode Gaussian (Bogoliubov) transformation. The molecular spectroscopic signal is reconstructed from the collective projection measurements on phonon modes of the trapped-ion system. Our experimental demonstration would pave the way to large-scale molecular quantum simulations, which are classically intractable.
  • In this work, we propose a flexible architecture of microwave resonators with tuneable couplings to perform quantum simulations of molecular chemistry problems. The architecture builds on the experience of the D-Wave design, working with nearly harmonic circuits instead of with qubits. This architecture, or modifications of it, can be used to emulate molecular processes such as vibronic transitions. Furthermore, we discuss several aspects of these emulations, such as dynamical ranges of the physical parameters, quenching times necessary for diabaticity and finally the possibility of implementing anharmonic corrections to the force fields by exploiting certain nonlinear features of superconducting devices.
  • In linear optics, photons are scattered in a network through passive optical elements including beamsplitters and phase shifters, leading to many intriguing applications in physics, such as Mach-Zehnder interferometry, Hong-Ou-Mandel effect, and tests of fundamental quantum mechanics. Here we present a general analytic expression governing the upper limit of the transition amplitudes in sampling bosons, through all realizable linear optics. Apart from boson sampling, this transition bound results in many other interesting applications, including behaviors of Bose-Einstein Condensates (BEC) in optical networks, counterparts of Hong-Ou-Mandel effects for multiple photons, and approximating permanents of matrices. Also, this general bound implies the existence of a polynomial-time randomized algorithm for estimating transition amplitudes of bosons, which represents a solution to an open problem raised by Aaronson and Hance in 2012.
  • The first post-classical computation will most probably be performed not on a universal quantum computer, but rather on a dedicated quantum hardware. A strong candidate for achieving this is represented by the task of sampling from the output distribution of linear quantum optical networks. This problem, known as boson sampling, has recently been shown to be intractable for any classical computer, but it is naturally carried out by running the corresponding experiment. However, only small scale realizations of boson sampling experiments have been demonstrated to date. Their main limitation is related to the non-deterministic state preparation and inefficient measurement step. Here, we propose an alternative setup to implement boson sampling that is based on microwave photons and not on optical photons. The certified scalability of superconducting devices indicates that this direction is promising for a large-scale implementation of boson sampling and allows for more flexible features like arbitrary state preparation and efficient photon-number measurements.
  • With quantum computers being out of reach for now, quantum simulators are the alternative devices for efficient and more exact simulation of problems that are challenging on conventional computers. Quantum simulators are classified into analog and digital, with the possibility of constructing "hybrid" simulators by combining both techniques. In this paper, we focus on analog quantum simulators of open quantum systems and address the limit that they can beat classical computers. In particular, as an example, we discuss simulation of the chlorosome light-harvesting antenna from green sulfur bacteria with over 250 phonon modes coupled to each electronic state. Furthermore, we propose physical setups that can be used to reproduce the quantum dynamics of a standard and multiple-mode Holstein model. The proposed scheme is based on currently available technology of superconducting circuits consist of flux qubits and quantum oscillators.
  • Quantum computers are expected to be more efficient in performing certain computations than any classical machine. Unfortunately, the technological challenges associated with building a full-scale quantum computer have not yet allowed the experimental verification of such an expectation. Recently, boson sampling has emerged as a problem that is suspected to be intractable on any classical computer, but efficiently implementable with a linear quantum optical setup. Therefore, boson sampling may offer an experimentally realizable challenge to the Extended Church-Turing thesis and this remarkable possibility motivated much of the interest around boson sampling, at least in relation to complexity-theoretic questions. In this work, we show that the successful development of a boson sampling apparatus would not only answer such inquiries, but also yield a practical tool for difficult molecular computations. Specifically, we show that a boson sampling device with a modified input state can be used to generate molecular vibronic spectra, including complicated effects such as Duschinsky rotations.
  • In studying open quantum systems, the environment is often approximated as a collection of non-interacting harmonic oscillators, a configuration also known as the star-bath model. It is also well known that the star-bath can be transformed into a nearest-neighbor interacting chain of oscillators. The chain-bath model has been widely used in renormalization group approaches. The transformation can be obtained by recursion relations or orthogonal polynomials. Based on a simple linear algebraic approach, we propose a bath partition strategy to reduce the system-bath coupling strength. As a result, the non-interacting star-bath is transformed into a set of weakly-coupled multiple parallel chains. The transformed bath model allows complex problems to be practically implemented on quantum simulators, and it can also be employed in various numerical simulations of open quantum dynamics.
  • The fluctuations of optical gap induced by the environment play crucial roles in electronic energy transfer dynamics. One of the simplest approaches to incorporate such fluctuations in energy transfer dynamics is the well known Haken-Strobl-Reineker model, in which the energy-gap fluctuation is approximated as a white noise. Recently, several groups have employed molecular dynamics simulations and excited-state calculations in conjunction to take the thermal fluctuation of excitation energies into account. Here, we discuss a rigorous connection between the stochastic and the atomistic bath models. If the phonon bath is treated classically, time evolution of the exciton-phonon system can be described by Ehrenfest dynamics. To establish the relationship between the stochastic and atomistic bath models, we employ a projection operator technique to derive the generalized Langevin equations for the energy-gap fluctuations. The stochastic bath model can be obtained as an approximation of the atomistic Ehrenfest equations via the generalized Langevin approach. Based on the connection, we propose a novel scheme to correct reorganization effects within the framework of stochastic models. The proposed scheme provides a better description of the population dynamics especially in the regime of strong exciton-phonon coupling. Finally, we discuss the effect of the bath reorganization in the absorption and fluorescence spectra of ideal J-aggregates in terms of the Stokes shifts. For this purpose, we introduce a simple relationship that relates the reorganization contribution to the Stokes shifts - the reorganization shift - to three parameters: the monomer reorganization energy, the relaxation time of the optical gap, and the exciton delocalization length. This simple relationship allows one to classify the origin of the Stokes shifts in molecular aggregates.
  • Living organisms have to adjust to their surrounding in order to survive in stressful conditions. We study this mechanism in one of most primitive creatures - photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria. These bacteria absorb photons very efficiently using the chlorosome antenna complexes and perform photosynthesis in extreme low-light environments. How the chlorosomes in green sulfur bacteria are acclimated to the stressful light conditions, for instance, if the spectrum of light is not optimal for absorption, is unknown. Studying Chlorobaculum tepidum cultures with far-red to near-infrared light-emitting diodes, we found that these bacteria react to changes in energy flow by regulating the amount of light-absorbing pigments and the size of the chlorosomes. Surprisingly, our results indicate that the bacteria can survive in near-infrared lights capturing low-frequency photons by the intermediate units of the light-harvesting complex. The latter strategy may be used by the species recently found near hydrothermal vents in the Pacific Ocean.
  • Phototrophic organisms such as plants, photosynthetic bacteria and algae use microscopic complexes of pigment molecules to absorb sunlight. Within the light-harvesting complexes, which frequently have several functional and structural subunits, the energy is transferred in the form of molecular excitations with very high efficiency. Green sulfur bacteria are considered to be amongst the most efficient light-harvesting organisms. Despite multiple experimental and theoretical studies of these bacteria the physical origin of the efficient and robust energy transfer in their light-harvesting complexes is not well understood. To study excitation dynamics at the systems level we introduce an atomistic model that mimics a complete light-harvesting apparatus of green sulfur bacteria. The model contains approximately 4000 pigment molecules and comprises a double wall roll for the chlorosome, a baseplate and six Fenna-Matthews-Olson trimer complexes. We show that the fast relaxation within functional subunits combined with the transfer between collective excited states of pigments can result in robust energy funneling. Energy transfer is robust on the initial excitation conditions and temperature changes. Moreover, the same mechanism describes the coexistence of multiple timescales of excitation dynamics frequently observed in ultrafast optical experiments. While our findings support the hypothesis of supertransfer, the model reveals energy transport through multiple channels on different length scales.
  • Green photosynthetic bacteria adjust the structure and functionality of the chlorosome - the light absorbing antenna complex - in response to environmental stress factors. The chlorosome is a natural self-assembled aggregate of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. In this study we report the regulation of the biogenesis of the Chlorobaculum tepidum chlorosome by carbon assimilation in conjunction with temperature changes. Our studies indicate that the carbon source and thermal stress culture of Cba. tepidum grows slower and incorporates less BChl c in the chlorosome. Compared with the chlorosome from other cultural conditions we investigated, the chlorosome from the carbon source and thermal stress culture displays: (a) smaller cross-sectional radius and overall size; (b) simplified BChl c homologues with smaller side chains; (c) blue-shifted Qy absorption maxima and (d) a sigmoid-shaped circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Using a theoretical model we analyze how the observed spectral modifications can be associated with structural changes of BChl aggregates inside the chlorosome. Our report suggests a mechanism of metabolic regulation for chlorosome biogenesis.
  • Chlorosomes are the largest and most efficient natural light-harvesting antenna systems. They contain thousands of pigment molecules - bacteriochlorophylls (BChls)- that are organized into supramolecular aggregates and form a very efficient network for excitonic energy migration. Here, we present a theoretical study of excitation energy transfer (EET) in the chlorosome based on experimental evidence of the molecular assembly. Our model for the exciton dynamics throughout the antenna combines a stochastic time propagation of the excitonic wave function with molecular dynamics simulations of supramolecular structure, and electronic structure calculations of the excited states. The simulation results reveal a detailed picture of the EET in the chlorosome. Coherent energy transfer is significant only for the first 50 fs after the initial excitation, and the wavelike motion of the exciton is completely damped at 100 fs. Characteristic time constants of incoherent energy transfer, subsequently, vary from 1 ps to several tens of ps. We assign the time scales of the EET to specific physical processes by comparing our results with the data obtained from time-resolved spectroscopy experiments.