• Generation of attosecond bunches of energetic electrons offers significant potential from ultrafast physics to novel radiation sources. However, it is still a great challenge to stably produce such electron beams with lasers, since the typical sub-femtosecond electron bunches from laser-plasma interactions either carry low beam charge, or propagate for only several tens of femtoseconds. Here we propose an all-optical scheme for generating dense attosecond electron bunches via the interaction of an intense Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) laser pulse with a nanofiber. The stable bunch train results from the unique field structure of a circularly polarized LG laser pulse, enabling each bunch to be phase-locked and accelerated forward with low divergence, high beam charge and large beam-angular-momentum. This paves the way for wide applications in various fields, e.g., ultrabrilliant attosecond x/$\gamma$-ray emission.
  • We present a new magnetic field generation mechanism in underdense plasmas driven by the beating of two, co-propagating, Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) orbital angular momentum (OAM) laser pulses with different frequencies and also different twist indices. The resulting twisted ponderomotive force drives up an electron plasma wave with a helical rotating structure. To second order, there is a nonlinear rotating current leading to the onset of an intense, static axial magnetic field, which persists over a long time in the plasma (ps scale) after the laser pulses have passed by. The results are confirmed in three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and also theoretical analysis. For the case of 300 fs duration, 3.8x10^17 W/cm^2 peak laser intensity we observe magnetic field of up to 0.4 MG. This new method of magnetic field creation may find applications in charged beam collimation and controlled fusion.
  • Large sensor-based science infrastructures for radio astronomy like the SKA will be among the most intensive data-driven projects in the world, facing very high demanding computation, storage, management, and above all power demands. The geographically wide distribution of the SKA and and its associated processing requirements in the form of tailored High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities, require a Greener approach towards the Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) adopted for the data processing to enable operational compliance to potentially strict power budgets. Addressing the reduction of electricity costs, improve system power monitoring and the generation and management of electricity at system level is paramount to avoid future inefficiencies and higher costs and enable fulfillments of Key Science Cases. Here we outline major characteristics and innovation approaches to address power efficiency and long-term power sustainability for radio astronomy projects, focusing on Green ICT for science and Smart power monitoring and control.
  • Laser wakefield accelerators have great potential as the basis for next generation compact radiation sources because their accelerating gradients are three orders of magnitude larger than traditional accelerators. However, X-ray radiation from such devices still lacks of tunability, especially the intensity and polarization distribution. Here we propose a tunable polarized radiation source from a helical plasma undulator based on plasma channel guided wakefield accelerator. When a laser pulse is initially incident with a skew angle relative to the channel axis, the laser and accelerated electrons experience collective spiral motions, which leads to elliptically polarized synchrotron-like radiation with flexible tunability on radiation intensity, spectra and polarization. We demonstrate that a radiation source with millimeter size and peak brilliance of $2\times10^{19} photons/s/mm^{2}/mrad^{2}/0.1%$ bandwidth can be made with moderate laser and electron beam parameters. This brilliance is comparable with the third generation of synchrotron radiation facilities running at similar photon energies, suggesting that laser plasma based radiation sources are promising for advanced applications.
  • There is a growing demand for X-ray Free-electron lasers (FELs) in various science fields, in particular for those with short pulses, larger photon fluxes and shorter wavelengths. The level of X-ray power and the pulse energy depend on the amount of electron bunch energy. Increasing the latter will increase the power of the radiating X-rays. Using numerical simulations we explore the possibility of using a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) scheme to increase the electron beam energy of an existing FEL facility without significantly increasing the accelerator length. In this paper we use parameters of the SwissFEL beam. The simulations are carried out in 2D cylindrical symmetry using the code OSIRIS. Initial results show an energy gain of ~2 GeV after propagation of 0.5 m in the plasma with a relative energy spread of ~1%.
  • When modeling laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in a Lorentz boosted frame, the plasma is drifting relativistically at $\beta_b c$ towards the laser, which can lead to a computational speedup of $\sim \gamma_b^2=(1-\beta_b^2)^{-1}$. Meanwhile, when LWFA is modeled in the quasi-3D geometry in which the electromagnetic fields and current are decomposed into a limited number of azimuthal harmonics, speedups are achieved by modeling three dimensional problems with the computation load on the order of two dimensional $r-z$ simulations. Here, we describe how to combine the speed ups from the Lorentz boosted frame and quasi-3D algorithms. The key to the combination is the use of a hybrid Yee-FFT solver in the quasi-3D geometry that can be used to effectively eliminate the Numerical Cerenkov Instability (NCI) that inevitably arises in a Lorentz boosted frame due to the unphysical coupling of Langmuir modes and EM modes of the relativistically drifting plasma in these simulations. In addition, based on the space-time distribution of the LWFA data in the lab and boosted frame, we propose to use a moving window to follow the drifting plasma to further reduce the computational load. We describe the details of how the NCI is eliminated for the quasi-3D geometry, the setups for simulations which combine the Lorentz boosted frame and quasi-3D geometry, the use of a moving window, and compare the results from these simulations against their corresponding lab frame cases. Good agreement is obtained, particularly when there is no self-trapping, which demonstrates it is possible to combine the Lorentz boosted frame and the quasi-3D algorithms when modeling LWFA to achieve unprecedented speedups.
  • A hybrid Maxwell solver for fully relativistic and electromagnetic (EM) particle-in-cell (PIC) codes is described. In this solver, the EM fields are solved in $k$ space by performing an FFT in one direction, while using finite difference operators in the other direction(s). This solver eliminates the numerical Cerenkov radiation for particles moving in the preferred direction. Moreover, the numerical Cerenkov instability (NCI) induced by the relativistically drifting plasma and beam can be eliminated using this hybrid solver by applying strategies that are similar to those recently developed for pure FFT solvers. A current correction is applied for the charge conserving current deposit to correctly account for the EM calculation in hybrid Yee-FFT solver. A theoretical analysis of the dispersion properties in vacuum and in a drifting plasma for the hybrid solver is presented, and compared with PIC simulations with good agreement obtained. This hybrid solver is applied to both 2D and 3D Cartesian and quasi-3D (in which the fields and current are decomposed into azimuthal harmonics) geometries. Illustrative results for laser wakefield accelerator simulation in a Lorentz boosted frame using the hybrid solver in the 2D Cartesian geometry are presented, and compared against results from 2D UPIC-EMMA simulation which uses a pure spectral Maxwell solver, and from OSIRIS 2D lab frame simulation using the standard Yee solver. Very good agreement is obtained which demonstrates the feasibility of using the hybrid solver for high fidelity simulation of relativistically drifting plasma with no evidence of the numerical Cerenkov instability.
  • When using an electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EM-PIC) code to simulate a relativistically drifting plasma, a violent numerical instability known as the numerical Cerenkov instability (NCI) occurs. The NCI is due to the unphysical coupling of electromagnetic waves on a grid to wave-particle resonances, including aliased resonances, i.e., $\omega + 2\pi\mu/\Delta t=(k_1+ 2\pi\nu_1/\Delta x_1)v_0$, where $\mu$ and $\nu_1$ refer to the time and space aliases and the plasma is drifting relativistically at velocity $v_0$ in the $\hat{1}$-direction. Recent studies have shown that an EM-PIC code which uses a spectral field solver and a low pass filter can eliminate the fastest growing modes of the NCI. Based on these studies a new spectral PIC code for studying laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in the Lorentz boosted frame was developed. However, we show that for parameters of relevance for LWFA simulations in the boosted frame, a relativistically drifting plasma is susceptible to a host of additional unstable modes with lower growth rates, and that these modes appear when the fastest growing unstable modes are filtered out. We show that these modes are most easily identified as the coupling between modes which are purely transverse (EM) and purely longitudinal (Langmuir) in the rest frame of the plasma for specific time and space aliases. We rewrite the dispersion relation of the drifting plasma for a general field solver and obtain analytic expressions for the location and growth rate for each unstable mode, i.e, for each time and space aliased resonances. We show for the spectral solver that when the fastest growing mode is eliminated a new mode at the fundamental resonance ($\mu=\nu_1=0$) can be seen. (Please check the whole abstract in the paper).
  • Simulating laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in a Lorentz boosted frame in which the plasma drifts towards the laser with $v_b$ can speedup the simulation by factors of $\gamma^2_b=(1-v^2_b/c^2)^{-1}$. In these simulations the relativistic drifting plasma inevitably induces a high frequency numerical instability that contaminates the interested physics. Various approaches have been proposed to mitigate this instability. One approach is to solve Maxwell equations in Fourier space (a spectral solver) as this has been shown to suppress the fastest growing modes of this instability in simple test problems using a simple low pass, ring (in two dimensions), or shell (in three dimensions) filter in Fourier space. We describe the development of a fully parallelized, multi-dimensional, particle-in-cell code that uses a spectral solver to solve Maxwell's equations and that includes the ability to launch a laser using a moving antenna. This new EM-PIC code is called UPIC-EMMA and it is based on the components of the UCLA PIC framework (UPIC). We show that by using UPIC-EMMA, LWFA simulations in the boosted frames with arbitrary $\gamma_b$ can be conducted without the presence of the numerical instability. We also compare the results of a few LWFA cases for several values of $\gamma_b$, including lab frame simulations using OSIRIS, a EM-PIC code with a finite difference time domain (FDTD) Maxwell solver. These comparisons include cases in both linear, and nonlinear regimes. We also investigate some issues associated with numerical dispersion in lab and boosted frame simulations and between FDTD and spectral solvers.
  • A new generation of laser wakefield accelerators, supported by the extreme accelerating fields generated in the interaction of PW-Class lasers and underdense targets, promises the production of high quality electron beams in short distances for multiple applications. Achieving this goal will rely heavily on numerical modeling for further understanding of the underlying physics and identification of optimal regimes, but large scale modeling of these scenarios is computationally heavy and requires efficient use of state-of-the-art Petascale supercomputing systems. We discuss the main difficulties involved in running these simulations and the new developments implemented in the OSIRIS framework to address these issues, ranging from multi-dimensional dynamic load balancing and hybrid distributed / shared memory parallelism to the vectorization of the PIC algorithm. We present the results of the OASCR Joule Metric program on the issue of large scale modeling of LWFA, demonstrating speedups of over 1 order of magnitude on the same hardware. Finally, scalability to over $\sim 10^6$ cores, and sustained performance over $\sim 2$ PFlops is demonstrated, opening the way for large scale modeling of laser wakefield accelerator scenarios.
  • Using full-scale 3D particle-in-cell simulations we show that the radiation reaction dominated regime can be reached in an all optical configuration through the collision of a $\sim$1 GeV laser wakefield accelerated (LWFA) electron bunch with a counter propagating laser pulse. In this configuration radiation reaction significantly reduces the energy of the particle bunch, thus providing clear experimental signatures for the process with currently available lasers. We also show that the transition between classical and quantum radiation reaction could be investigated in the same configuration with laser intensities of $10^{24}\mathrm{W/cm^2}$.