• We investigate to which precision local magnification ratios, $\mathcal{J}$, ratios of convergences, $f$, and reduced shears, $g = (g_{1}, g_{2})$, can be determined model-independently for the five resolved multiple images of the source at $z_\mathrm{s}=1.675$ in CL0024. We also determine if a comparison to the respective results obtained by the parametric modelling program Lenstool and by the non-parametric modelling program Grale can detect biases in the lens models. For these model-based approaches we additionally analyse the influence of the number and location of the constraints from multiple images on the local lens properties determined at the positions of the five multiple images of the source at $z_\mathrm{s}=1.675$. All approaches show high agreement on the local values of $\mathcal{J}$, $f$, and $g$. We find that Lenstool obtains the tightest confidence bounds even for convergences around one using constraints from six multiple image systems, while the best Grale model is generated only using constraints from all multiple images with resolved brightness features and adding limited small-scale mass corrections. Yet, confidence bounds as large as the values themselves can occur for convergences close to one in all approaches. Our results are in agreement with previous findings, supporting the light-traces-mass assumption and the merger hypothesis for CL0024. Comparing the three different approaches allows to detect modelling biases. Given that the lens properties remain approximately constant over the extension of the image areas covered by the resolvable brightness features, the model-independent approach determines the local lens properties to a comparable precision but within less than a second. (shortened)
  • We present integral field spectroscopy of galaxy cluster Abell 3827, using ALMA and VLT/MUSE. It reveals an unusual configuration of strong gravitational lensing in the cluster core, with at least seven lensed images of a single background spiral galaxy. Lens modelling based on HST imaging had suggested that the dark matter associated with one of the cluster's central galaxies may be offset. The new spectroscopic data enable better subtraction of foreground light, and better identification of multiple background images. The inferred distribution of dark matter is consistent with being centered on the galaxies, as expected by LCDM. Each galaxy's dark matter also appears to be symmetric. Whilst we do not find an offset between mass and light (suggestive of self-interacting dark matter) as previously reported, the numerical simulations that have been performed to calibrate Abell 3827 indicate that offsets and asymmetry are still worth looking for in collisions with particular geometries. Meanwhile, ALMA proves exceptionally useful for strong lens image identifications.
  • Using the power of gravitational lensing magnification by massive galaxy clusters, the Hubble Frontier Fields provide deep views of six patches of the high redshift Universe. The combination of deep Hubble imaging and exceptional lensing strength has revealed the greatest numbers of multiply-imaged galaxies available to constrain models of cluster mass distributions. However, even with $\mathcal{O}(100)$ images per cluster, the uncertainties associated with the reconstructions are not negligible. The goal of this paper is to show the diversity of model magnification predictions. We examine 7 and 9 mass models of Abell 2744 and MACS J0416, respectively, submitted to the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes for public distribution in September 2015. The dispersion between model predictions increases from 30% at common low magnifications ($\mu\sim2$) to 70% at rare high magnifications ($\mu\sim40$). MACS J0416 exhibits smaller dispersions than Abell 2744 for $2<\mu<10$. We show that magnification maps based on different lens inversion techniques typically differ from each other by more than their quoted statistical errors. This suggests that some models underestimate the true uncertainties, which are primarily due to various lensing degeneracies. Though the exact mass sheet degeneracy is broken, its generalized counterpart is not broken at least in Abell 2744. Other, local degeneracies are also present in both clusters. Our comparison of models is complementary to the comparison of reconstructions of known synthetic mass distributions. By focusing on observed clusters, we can identify those that are best constrained, and therefore provide the clearest view of the distant Universe.
  • We reconstruct the projected mass distribution of a massive merging Hubble Frontier Fields cluster MACSJ0416 using the genetic algorithm based free-form technique called Grale. The reconstructions are constrained by 149 lensed images identified by Jauzac et al. using HFF data. No information about cluster galaxies or light is used, which makes our reconstruction unique in this regard. Using visual inspection of the maps, as well as galaxy-mass correlation functions we conclude that overall light does follow mass. Furthermore, the fact that brighter galaxies are more strongly clustered with mass is an important confirmation of the standard biasing scenario in galaxy clusters. On the smallest scales, approximately less than a few arcseconds, the resolution afforded by 149 images is still not sufficient to confirm or rule out galaxy-mass offsets of the kind observed in ACO 3827. We also compare the mass maps of MACSJ0416 obtained by three different groups: Grale, and two parametric Lenstool reconstructions from the CATS and Sharon/Johnson teams. Overall, the three agree well; one interesting discrepancy between Grale and Lenstool galaxy-mass correlation functions occurs on scales of tens of kpc and may suggest that cluster galaxies are more biased tracers of mass than parametric methods generally assume.
  • The Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) are six clusters of galaxies, all showing indications of recent mergers, which have recently been observed for lensed images. As such they are the natural laboratories to study the merging history of galaxy clusters. In this work, we explore the 2D power spectrum of the mass distribution $P_{\rm M}(k)$ as a measure of substructure. We compare $P_{\rm M}(k)$ of these clusters (obtained using strong gravitational lensing) to that of $\Lambda$CDM simulated clusters of similar mass. To compute lensing $P_{\rm M}(k)$, we produced free-form lensing mass reconstructions of HFF clusters, without any light traces mass (LTM) assumption. The inferred power at small scales tends to be larger if (i)~the cluster is at lower redshift, and/or (ii)~there are deeper observations and hence more lensed images. In contrast, lens reconstructions assuming LTM show higher power at small scales even with fewer lensed images; it appears the small scale power in the LTM reconstructions is dominated by light information, rather than the lensing data. The average lensing derived $P_{\rm M}(k)$ shows lower power at small scales as compared to that of simulated clusters at redshift zero, both dark-matter only and hydrodynamical. The possible reasons are: (i)~the available strong lensing data are limited in their effective spatial resolution on the mass distribution, (ii)~HFF clusters have yet to build the small scale power they would have at $z\sim 0$, or (iii)~simulations are somehow overestimating the small scale power.
  • Gravitational lensing time delays are well known to depend on cosmological parameters, but they also depend on the details of the mass distribution of the lens. It is usual to model the mass distribution and use time-delay observations to infer cosmological parameters, but it is naturally also possible to take the cosmological parameters as given and use time delays as constraints on the mass distribution. This paper develops a method to isolate what exactly those constraints are, using a principal-components analysis of ensembles of free-form mass models. We find that time delays provide tighter constraints on the distribution of matter in the very high dense regions of the lensing clusters. We apply it to the cluster lens SDSS J1004+4112, whose rich lensing data includes two time delays. We find, assuming a concordance cosmology, that the time delays constrain the central region of the cluster to be rounder and less lopsided than would be allowed by lensed images alone. This detailed information about the distribution of the matter is very useful for studying the dense regions of the galaxy clusters which are very difficult to study with direct measurements. A further time-delay measurement, which is expected, will make this system even more interesting.
  • We have made mass maps of three strong-lensing clusters, Abell 3827, Abell 2218 and Abell 1689, in order to test for mass-light offsets. The technique used is GRALE, which enables lens reconstruction with minimal assumptions, and specifically with no information about the cluster light being given. In the first two of these clusters, we find local mass peaks in the central regions that are displaced from the nearby galaxies by a few to several kpc. These offsets {\em could\/} be due to line of sight structure unrelated to the clusters, but that is very unlikely, given the typical levels of chance line-of-sight coincidences in $\Lambda CDM$ simulations --- for Abell 3827 and Abell 2218 the offsets appear to be intrinsic. In the case of Abell 1689, we see no significant offsets in the central region, but we do detect a possible line of sight structure: it appears only when sources at $z\ga 3$ are used for reconstructing the mass. We discuss possible origins of the mass-galaxy offsets in Abell 3827 and Abell 2218: these include pure gravitational effects like dynamical friction, but also non-standard mechanisms like self-interacting dark-matter.
  • We present a strong-lensing analysis of the galaxy cluster MS 1358.4+6245 ($z=0.33$), in deep 6-band ACS/HST imaging. In addition to the well-studied system at $z=4.92$, our modelling method uncovers 19 new multiply-lensed images so that a total of 23 images and their redshifts are used to accurately constrain the inner mass distribution. We derive a relatively shallow inner mass profile, $d\log \Sigma/d\log r\simeq -0.33 \pm0.05$ ($r<200$ kpc), with a much higher magnification than estimated previously by models constrained only by the $z=4.92$ system. Using these many new images we can apply a non-parametric adaptive-grid method, which also yields a shallow mass profile without prior assumptions, strengthening our conclusions. The total magnification of the $z_s=4.92$ galaxy is high, about a $\sim100\times$ over its four images, so that the inferred source size, luminosity and star-formation rate are about $\sim5\times$ smaller than previous estimates, corresponding to a dwarf-sized galaxy of radius $\simeq1$ kpc. A detailed image of the interior morphology of the source is generated with a high effective resolution of only $\simeq$50 pc, thanks to the high magnification and to the declining angular diameter distance above $z\sim1.5$ for the standard cosmology, so that this image apparently represents the best resolved object known at high redshift.
  • The inner mass-profile of the relaxed cluster Abell 1703 is analysed by two very different strong-lensing techniques applied to deep ACS and WFC3 imaging. Our parametric method has the accuracy required to reproduce the many sets of multiple images, based on the assumption that mass approximately traces light. We test this assumption with a fully non-parametric, adaptive grid method, with no knowledge of the galaxy distribution. Differences between the methods are seen on fine scales due to member galaxies which must be included in models designed to search for lensed images, but on the larger scale the general distribution of dark matter is in good agreement, with very similar radial mass profiles. We add undiluted weak-lensing measurements from deep multi-colour Subaru imaging to obtain a fully model-independent mass profile out to the virial radius and beyond. Consistency is found in the region of overlap between the weak and strong lensing, and the full mass profile is well-described by an NFW model of a concentration parameter, $c_{\rm vir}\simeq 7.15\pm0.5$ (and $M_{vir}\simeq 1.22\pm0.15 \times 10^{15}M_{\odot}/h$). Abell 1703 lies above the standard $c$--$M$ relation predicted for the standard $\Lambda$CDM model, similar to other massive relaxed clusters with accurately determined lensing-based profiles.