• Statistical methodology for the design and analysis of clinical Phase II dose response studies, with related software implementation, are well developed for the case of a normally distributed, homoscedastic response considered for a single timepoint in parallel group study designs. In practice, however, binary, count, or time-to-event endpoints are often used, typically measured repeatedly over time and sometimes in more complex settings like crossover study designs. In this paper we develop an overarching methodology to perform efficient multiple comparisons and modeling for dose finding, under uncertainty about the dose-response shape, using general parametric models. The framework described here is quite general and covers dose finding using generalized non-linear models, linear and non-linear mixed effects models, Cox proportional hazards (PH) models, etc. In addition to the core framework, we also develop a general purpose methodology to fit dose response data in a computationally and statistically efficient way. Several examples, using a variety of different statistical models, illustrate the breadth of applicability of the results. For the analyses we developed the R add-on package DoseFinding, which provides a convenient interface to the general approach adopted here.
  • Dose-finding studies are frequently conducted to evaluate the effect of different doses or concentration levels of a compound on a response of interest. Applications include the investigation of a new medicinal drug, a herbicide or fertilizer, a molecular entity, an environmental toxin, or an industrial chemical. In pharmaceutical drug development, dose-finding studies are of critical importance because of regulatory requirements that marketed doses are safe and provide clinically relevant efficacy. Motivated by a dose-finding study in moderate persistent asthma, we propose response-adaptive designs addressing two major challenges in dose-finding studies: uncertainty about the dose-response models and large variability in parameter estimates. To allocate new cohorts of patients in an ongoing study, we use optimal designs that are robust under model uncertainty. In addition, we use a Bayesian shrinkage approach to stabilize the parameter estimates over the successive interim analyses used in the adaptations. This approach allows us to calculate updated parameter estimates and model probabilities that can then be used to calculate the optimal design for subsequent cohorts. The resulting designs are hence robust with respect to model misspecification and additionally can efficiently adapt to the information accrued in an ongoing study. We focus on adaptive designs for estimating the minimum effective dose, although alternative optimality criteria or mixtures thereof could be used, enabling the design to address multiple objectives.