• Using the N-body simulations of the AEMULUS Project, we construct an emulator for the non-linear clustering of galaxies in real and redshift space. We construct our model of galaxy bias using the halo occupation framework, accounting for possible velocity bias. The model includes 15 parameters, including both cosmological and galaxy bias parameters. We demonstrate that our emulator achieves ~ 1% precision at the scales of interest, 0.1<r<10 h^{-1} Mpc, and recovers the true cosmology when tested against independent simulations. Our primary parameters of interest are related to the growth rate of structure, f, and its degenerate combination fsigma_8. Using this emulator, we show that the constraining power on these parameters monotonically increases as smaller scales are included in the analysis, all the way down to 0.1 h^{-1} Mpc. For a BOSS-like survey, the constraints on fsigma_8 from r<30 h^{-1} Mpc scales alone are more than a factor of two tighter than those from the fiducial BOSS analysis of redshift-space clustering using perturbation theory at larger scales. The combination of real- and redshift-space clustering allows us to break the degeneracy between f and sigma_8, yielding a 9% constraint on f alone for a BOSS-like analysis. The current AEMULUS simulations limit this model to surveys of massive galaxies. Future simulations will allow this framework to be extended to all galaxy target types, including emission-line galaxies.
  • The rapidly growing statistical precision of galaxy surveys has lead to a need for ever-more precise predictions of the observables used to constrain cosmological and galaxy formation models. The primary avenue through which such predictions will be obtained is suites of numerical simulations. These simulations must span the relevant model parameter spaces, be large enough to obtain the precision demanded by upcoming data, and be thoroughly validated in order to ensure accuracy. In this paper we present one such suite of simulations, forming the basis for the AEMULUS Project, a collaboration devoted to precision emulation of galaxy survey observables. We have run a set of 75 (1.05 h^-1 Gpc)^3 simulations with mass resolution and force softening of 3.51\times 10^10 (Omega_m / 0.3) ~ h^-1 M_sun and 20 ~ h^-1 kpc respectively in 47 different wCDM cosmologies spanning the range of parameter space allowed by the combination of recent Cosmic Microwave Background, Baryon Acoustic Oscillation and Type Ia Supernovae results. We present convergence tests of several observables including spherical overdensity halo mass functions, galaxy projected correlation functions, galaxy clustering in redshift space, and matter and halo correlation functions and power spectra. We show that these statistics are converged to 1% (2%) for halos with more than 500 (200) particles respectively and scales of r>200 ~ h^-1 kpc in real space or k ~ 3 h Mpc^-1 in harmonic space for z\le 1. We find that the dominant source of uncertainty comes from varying the particle loading of the simulations. This leads to large systematic errors for statistics using halos with fewer than 200 particles and scales smaller than k ~ 4 h^-1 Mpc. We provide the halo catalogs and snapshots detailed in this work to the community at https://AemulusProject.github.io.
  • Existing models for the dependence of the halo mass function on cosmological parameters will become a limiting source of systematic uncertainty for cluster cosmology in the near future. We present a halo mass function emulator and demonstrate improved accuracy relative to state-of-the-art analytic models. In this work, mass is defined using an overdensity criteria of 200 relative to the mean background density. Our emulator is constructed from the AEMULUS simulations, a suite of 40 N-body simulations with snapshots from z=3 to z=0. These simulations cover the flat wCDM parameter space allowed by recent Cosmic Microwave Background, Baryon Acoustic Oscillation and Type Ia Supernovae results, varying the parameters w, Omega_m, Omega_b, sigma_8, N_{eff}, n_s, and H_0. We validate our emulator using five realizations of seven different cosmologies, for a total of 35 test simulations. These test simulations were not used in constructing the emulator, and were run with fully independent initial conditions. We use our test simulations to characterize the modeling uncertainty of the emulator, and introduce a novel way of marginalizing over the associated systematic uncertainty. We confirm non-universality in our halo mass function emulator as a function of both cosmological parameters and redshift. Our emulator achieves better than 1% precision over much of the relevant parameter space, and we demonstrate that the systematic uncertainty in our emulator will remain a negligible source of error for cluster abundance studies through at least the LSST Year 1 data set.
  • The use of high-quality simulated sky catalogs is essential for the success of cosmological surveys. The catalogs have diverse applications, such as investigating signatures of fundamental physics in cosmological observables, understanding the effect of systematic uncertainties on measured signals and testing mitigation strategies for reducing these uncertainties, aiding analysis pipeline development and testing, and survey strategy optimization. The list of applications is growing with improvements in the quality of the catalogs and the details that they can provide. Given the importance of simulated catalogs, it is critical to provide rigorous validation protocols that enable both catalog providers and users to assess the quality of the catalogs in a straightforward and comprehensive way. For this purpose, we have developed the DESCQA framework for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope Dark Energy Science Collaboration as well as for the broader community. The goal of DESCQA is to enable the inspection, validation, and comparison of an inhomogeneous set of synthetic catalogs via the provision of a common interface within an automated framework. In this paper, we present the design concept and first implementation of DESCQA. In order to establish and demonstrate its full functionality we use a set of interim catalogs and validation tests. We highlight several important aspects, both technical and scientific, that require thoughtful consideration when designing a validation framework, including validation metrics and how these metrics impose requirements on the synthetic sky catalogs.
  • We present cosmological constraints from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) using a combined analysis of angular clustering of red galaxies and their cross-correlation with weak gravitational lensing of background galaxies. We use a 139 square degree contiguous patch of DES data from the Science Verification (SV) period of observations. Using large scale measurements, we constrain the matter density of the Universe as Omega_m = 0.31 +/- 0.09 and the clustering amplitude of the matter power spectrum as sigma_8 = 0.74 +/- 0.13 after marginalizing over seven nuisance parameters and three additional cosmological parameters. This translates into S_8 = sigma_8(Omega_m/0.3)^{0.16} = 0.74 +/- 0.12 for our fiducial lens redshift bin at 0.35 <z< 0.5, while S_8 = 0.78 +/- 0.09 using two bins over the range 0.2 <z< 0.5. We study the robustness of the results under changes in the data vectors, modelling and systematics treatment, including photometric redshift and shear calibration uncertainties, and find consistency in the derived cosmological parameters. We show that our results are consistent with previous cosmological analyses from DES and other data sets and conclude with a joint analysis of DES angular clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing with Planck CMB data, Baryon Accoustic Oscillations and Supernova type Ia measurements.