• We report observations of color in the inner coma of Comet C/2013 UQ4 (Catalina) with the broadband B and R filters. We find significant temporal variations of the color slope, ranging from -12.67 $\pm$ 8.16 \% per 0.1~$\mu$m up to $35.09 \pm 11.7$ \% per 0.1~$\mu$m.It is significant that the comet changes color from red to blue over only a two-day period. Such dispersion cannot be characterized with an average color slope. We also observe Comet C/2013 UQ4 (Catalina) in infrared using Spitzer and find no significant CO/CO$_{2}$ gaseous species in its coma. Therefore, we classify Comet C/2013 UQ4 (Catalina) as a dust-rich comet and attribute the measured color slope to its dust. We analyze the color slope using the model of agglomerated debris particles and conclude that the C/2013 UQ4 coma was chemically heterogeneous, consisting of at least two components. The first component producing the bluest color is consistent with Mg-rich silicates. There are three different options for the second component producing the reddest color. This color is consistent with either Mg-Fe silicates, kerogen type II, or organic matter processed with a low dose of UV radiation.
  • We present the initial results of our investigation of the star-forming complex W49, one of the youngest and most luminous massive star forming regions in our Galaxy. We used Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) data to investigate massive star formation with the primary objective to locate a representative set of protostars and the clusters of young stars that are forming around them. We present our source catalog with the mosaics from the IRAC data. In this study we used a combination of IRAC, MIPS, Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and UKIRT Deep Infrared Sky Survey (UKIDSS) data to identify and classify the Young Stellar Objects (YSOs). We identified 232 Class 0/I YSOs, 907 Class II YSOs, and 74 transition disk candidate objects using color-color and color-magnitude diagrams. In addition, to understand the evolution of star formation in W49 we analysed the distribution of YSOs in the region to identify clusters using a minimal spanning tree method. The fraction of YSOs that belong to clusters with >7 members is found to be 52% for a cut-off distance of 96" and the ratio of Class II/I objects is 2.1. We compared the W49 region to the G305 and G333 star forming regions and concluded that the W49 has the richest population with 7 subclusters of YSOs.
  • We present new Spitzer/IRAC observations of 55 dusty Long Period Variables (LPVs, 48 AGB and 6 RSG stars) in the Galaxy that have different chemistry, variability type, and mass-loss rate. O-rich AGB stars (including intrinsic S-type) tend to have redder [3.6]-[8.0] colors than carbon stars for a given [3.6]-[4.5] color due to silicate features increasing the flux in the 8.0 {\mu}m IRAC band. For colors including the 5.8 {\mu}m band, carbon stars separate into two distinct sequences, likely due to a variable photospheric C$_3$ feature that is only visible in relatively unobscured, low mass-loss rate sources. Semiregular variables tend to have smaller IR excess in [3.6]-[8.0] color than Miras, consistent with the hypothesis that semiregular variables lose mass discontinuously. Miras have redder colors for longer periods while semiregular variables do not. Galactic AGB stars follow the period-luminosity sequences found for the Magellanic Clouds. Mira variables fall along the fundamental pulsation sequence, while semiregular variables are mostly on overtone sequences. We also derive a relationship between mass-loss rate and [3.6]-[8.0] color. The fits are similar in shape to those found by other authors for AGBs in the LMC, but discrepant in overall normalization, likely due to different assumptions in the models used to derive mass-loss rates. We find that IR colors are not unique discriminators of chemical type, suggesting caution when using color selection techniques to infer the chemical composition of AGB dust returned to the ISM.
  • The near-Earth object (NEO) population, which mainly consists of fragments from collisions between asteroids in the main asteroid belt, is thought to include contributions from short-period comets as well. One of the most promising NEO candidates for a cometary origin is near-Earth asteroid (3552) Don Quixote, which has never been reported to show activity. Here we present the discovery of cometary activity in Don Quixote based on thermal-infrared observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope in its 3.6 and 4.5 {\mu}m bands. Our observations clearly show the presence of a coma and a tail in the 4.5 {\mu}m but not in the 3.6 {\mu}m band, which is consistent with molecular band emission from CO2. Thermal modeling of the combined photometric data on Don Quixote reveals a diameter of 18.4 (-0.4/+0.3) km and an albedo of 0.03 (-0.01/+0.02), which confirms Don Quixote to be the third-largest known NEO. We derive an upper limit on the dust production rate of 1.9 kg s^-1 and derive a CO2 gas production rate of (1.1+-0.1)10^26 molecules s^-1. Spitzer IRS spectroscopic observations indicate the presence of fine-grained silicates, perhaps pyroxene rich, on the surface of Don Quixote. Our discovery suggests that CO2 can be present in near-Earth space over a long time. The presence of CO2 might also explain that Don Quixote's cometary nature remained hidden for nearly three decades.
  • Near-infrared spectroscopy of Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) connects diagnostic spectral features to specific surface mineralogies. The combination of spectroscopy with albedos and diameters derived from thermal infrared observations can increase the scientific return beyond that of the individual datasets. To that end, we have completed a spectroscopic observing campaign to complement the ExploreNEOs Warm Spitzer program that obtained albedos and diameters of nearly 600 NEOs (Trilling et al. 2010). Here we present the results of observations using the low-resolution prism mode (~0.7-2.5 microns) of the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). We also include near-infrared observations of ExploreNEOs targets from the MIT-UH-IRTF Joint Campaign for Spectral Reconnaissance. Our dataset includes near-infrared spectra of 187 ExploreNEOs targets (125 observations of 92 objects from our survey and 213 observations of 154 objects from the MIT survey). We identify a taxonomic class for each spectrum and use band parameter analysis to investigate the mineralogies for the S-, Q-, and V-complex objects. Our analysis suggests that for spectra that contain near-infrared data but lack the visible wavelength region, the Bus-DeMeo system misidentifies some S-types as Q-types. We find no correlation between spectral band parameters and ExploreNEOs albedos and diameters. We find slightly negative Band Area Ratio (BAR) correlations with phase angle for Eros and Ivar, but a positive BAR correlation with phase angle for Ganymed. We find evidence for spectral phase reddening for Eros, Ganymed, and Ivar. We identify the likely ordinary chondrite type analog for a subset of our sample. Our resulting proportions of H, L, and LL ordinary chondrites differ from those calculated for meteorite falls and in previous studies of ordinary chondrite-like NEOs.
  • We present infrared observations of the ultra-compact H II region W3(OH) made by the FORCAST instrument aboard SOFIA and by Spitzer/IRAC. We contribute new wavelength data to the spectral energy distribution, which constrains the optical depth, grain size distribution, and temperature gradient of the dusty shell surrounding the H II region. We model the dust component as a spherical shell containing an inner cavity with radius ~ 600 AU, irradiated by a central star of type O9 and temperature ~ 31,000 K. The total luminosity of this system is 71,000 L_solar. An observed excess of 2.2 - 4.5 microns emission in the SED can be explained by our viewing a cavity opening or clumpiness in the shell structure whereby radiation from the warm interior of the shell can escape. We claim to detect the nearby water maser source W3 (H2O) at 31.4 and 37.1 microns using beam deconvolution of the FORCAST images. We constrain the flux densities of this object at 19.7 - 37.1 microns. Additionally, we present in situ observations of four young stellar and protostellar objects in the SOFIA field, presumably associated with the W3 molecular cloud. Results from the model SED fitting tool of Robitaille et al. (2006, 2007} suggest that two objects (2MASS J02270352+6152357 and 2MASS J02270824+6152281) are intermediate-luminosity (~ 236 - 432 L_solar) protostars; one object (2MASS J02270887+6152344) is either a high-mass protostar with luminosity 3000 L_solar or a less massive young star with a substantial circumstellar disk but depleted envelope; and one object (2MASS J02270743+6152281) is an intermediate-luminosity (~ 768 L_solar) protostar nearing the end of its envelope accretion phase or a young star surrounded by a circumstellar disk with no appreciable circumstellar envelope.
  • The dominant non-instrumental background source for space-based infrared observatories is the zo- diacal light. We present Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) measurements of the zodiacal light at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {\mu}m, taken as part of the instrument calibrations. We measure the changing surface brightness levels in approximately weekly IRAC observations near the north ecliptic pole (NEP) over the period of roughly 8.5 years. This long time baseline is crucial for measuring the annual sinusoidal variation in the signal levels due to the tilt of the dust disk with respect to the ecliptic, which is the true signal of the zodiacal light. This is compared to both Cosmic Background Explorer Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (COBE DIRBE) data and a zodiacal light model based thereon. Our data show a few percent discrepancy from the Kelsall et al. (1998) model including a potential warping of the interplanetary dust disk and a previously detected overdensity in the dust cloud directly behind the Earth in its orbit. Accurate knowledge of the zodiacal light is important for both extragalactic and Galactic astronomy including measurements of the cosmic infrared background, absolute measures of extended sources, and comparison to extrasolar interplanetary dust models. IRAC data can be used to further inform and test future zodiacal light models.
  • We report the discovery of ten proplyd-like objects in the vicinity of the massive OB association Cygnus OB2. They were discovered in IPHAS H-Alpha images and are clearly resolved in broad-band HST/ACS, near-IR and Spitzer mid-IR images. All exhibit the familiar tadpole shape seen in photoevaporating objects such as the Orion proplyds, with a bright ionization front at the head facing the central cluster of massive stars, and a tail stretching in the opposite direction. Many also show secondary ionization fronts, complex tail morphologies or multiple heads. We consider the evidence that these are either proplyds or `evaporating gaseous globules' (EGGs) left over from a fragmenting molecular cloud, but find that neither scenario fully explains the observations. Typical sizes are 50,000--100,000 AU, larger than the Orion proplyds, but in agreement with the theoretical scaling of proplyd size with distance from the ionizing source. These objects are located at projected separations of 6-14pc from the OB association, compared to 0.1pc for the Orion proplyds, but are clearly being photoionized by the 65 O-type stars in Cyg OB2. Central star candidates are identified in near- and mid-IR images, supporting the proplyd scenario, though their large sizes and notable asymmetries is more consistent with the EGG scenario. A third possibility is therefore considered, that these are a unique class of photoevaporating partially-embedded young stellar objects that have survived the destruction of their natal molecular cloud. This has implications for the properties of stars that form in the vicinity of massive stars.
  • The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) provides a unique laboratory for the study of the lifecycle of dust given its low metallicity (~1/5 solar) and relative proximity (~60 kpc). This motivated the SAGE-SMC (Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Stripped, Low Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud) Spitzer Legacy program with the specific goals of studying the amount and type of dust in the present interstellar medium, the sources of dust in the winds of evolved stars, and how much dust is consumed in star formation. This program mapped the full SMC (30 sq. deg.) including the Body, Wing, and Tail in 7 bands from 3.6 to 160 micron using the IRAC and MIPS instruments on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The data were reduced, mosaicked, and the point sources measured using customized routines specific for large surveys. We have made the resulting mosaics and point source catalogs available to the community. The infrared colors of the SMC are compared to those of other nearby galaxies and the 8 micron/24 micron ratio is somewhat lower and the 70 micron/160 micron ratio is somewhat higher than the average. The global infrared spectral energy distribution shows that the SMC has ~3X lower aromatic emission/PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) abundances compared to most nearby galaxies. Infrared color-magnitude diagrams are given illustrating the distribution of different asymptotic giant branch stars and the locations of young stellar objects. Finally, the average spectral energy distribution (SED) of HII/star formation regions is compared to the equivalent Large Magellanic Cloud average HII/star formation region SED. These preliminary results are expanded in detail in companion papers.
  • Fundamental parameters and time-evolution of mass loss are investigated for post-main-sequence stars in the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104). This is accomplished by fitting spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to existing optical and infrared photometry and spectroscopy, to produce a true Hertzsprung--Russell diagram. We confirm the cluster's distance as 4611 (+213, -200) pc and age as 12 +/- 1 Gyr. Horizontal branch models appear to confirm that no more RGB mass loss occurs in 47 Tuc than in the more-metal-poor omega Centauri, though difficulties arise due to inconsistencies between the models. Using our SEDs, we identify those stars which exhibit infrared excess, finding excess only among the brightest giants: dusty mass loss begins at a luminosity of ~ 1000 Lsun, becoming ubiquitous above 2000 Lsun. Recent claims of dust production around lower-luminosity giants cannot be reproduced, despite using the same archival Spitzer imagery.
  • We present the photometric catalogs for the star-forming cluster NGC 602 in the wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud covering a range of wavelengths from optical HST/ACS (F555W, F814W) and SMARTS/ANDICAM (V, I) to infrared (Spitzer/IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 micron and MIPS 24 micron). Combining this with IRSF (InfraRed Survey Facility) near-infrared photometry (J, H, Ks), we compare the young main sequence (MS) and pre-main sequence (PMS) populations prominent in the optical with the current young stellar object (YSO) populations revealed by the infrared (IR). We analyze the MS and PMS population with isochrones in color-magnitude diagrams to derive ages and masses. The optical data reveal ~565 PMS candidates, low mass Stage III YSOs. We characterize ~40 YSOs by fitting their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to a grid of models (Robitaille et al. 2007) to derive luminosities, masses and evolutionary phase (Stage I-III). The higher resolution HST images reveal that ~70% of the YSO candidates are either multiples or protoclusters. For YSOs and PMS sources found in common, we find a consistency in the masses derived. We use the YSO mass function to derive a present-day star-formation rate of ~0.2-1.0 Msun/yr/kpc^2, similar to the rate derived from the optical star formation history suggesting a constant star formation rate for this region. We demonstrate a progression of star formation from the optical star cluster center to the edge of the star forming dust cloud. We derive lifetimes of a few 10^5 years for the YSO Stages I and II.
  • HII regions are the birth places of stars, and as such they provide the best measure of current star formation rates (SFRs) in galaxies. The close proximity of the Magellanic Clouds allows us to probe the nature of these star forming regions at small spatial scales. We aim to determine the monochromatic IR band that most accurately traces the bolometric IR flux (TIR), which can then be used to estimate an obscured SFR. We present the spatial analysis, via aperture/annulus photometry, of 16 LMC and 16 SMC HII region complexes using the Spitzer IRAC and MIPS bands. UV rocket data and SHASSA H-alpha data are also included. We find that nearly all of the LMC and SMC HII region SEDs peak around 70um, from ~10 to ~400 pc from the central sources. As a result, the sizes of HII regions as probed by 70um is approximately equal to the sizes as probed by TIR (about 70 pc in radius); the radial profile of the 70um flux, normalized by TIR, is constant at all radii (70um ~ 0.45 TIR); the 1-sigma standard deviation of the 70um fluxes, normalized by TIR, is a lower fraction of the mean (0.05 to 0.12 out to ~220 pc) than the normalized 8, 24, and 160um normalized fluxes (0.12 to 0.52); and these results are invariant between the LMC and SMC. From these results, we argue that 70um is the most suitable IR band to use as a monochromatic obscured star formation indicator because it most accurately reproduces the TIR of HII regions in the LMC and SMC and over large spatial scales. We also explore the general trends of the 8, 24, 70, and 160um bands in the LMC and SMC HII region SEDs, radial surface brightness profiles, sizes, and normalized (by TIR) radial flux profiles. We derive an obscured SFR equation that is modified from the literature to use 70um luminosity, SFR(Mo/yr) = 9.7(0.7)x10^{-44} L(70)(ergs/s), which is applicable from 10 to 300 pc distance from the center of an HII region.
  • We present observations of newly discovered 24 micron circumstellar structures detected with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) around three evolved stars in the Cygnus-X star forming region. One of the objects, BD+43 3710, has a bipolar nebula, possibly due to an outflow or a torus of material. A second, HBHA 4202-22, a Wolf-Rayet candidate, shows a circular shell of 24 micron emission suggestive of either a limb-brightened shell or disk seen face-on. No diffuse emission was detected around either of these two objects in the Spitzer 3.6-8 micron Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) bands. The third object is the luminous blue variable candidate G79.29+0.46. We resolved the previously known inner ring in all four IRAC bands. The 24 micron emission from the inner ring extends ~1.2 arcmin beyond the shorter wavelength emission, well beyond what can be attributed to the difference in resolutions between MIPS and IRAC. Additionally, we have discovered an outer ring of 24 micron emission, possibly due to an earlier episode of mass loss. For the two shell stars, we present the results of radiative transfer models, constraining the stellar and dust shell parameters. The shells are composed of amorphous carbon grains, plus polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the case of G79.29+0.46. Both G79.29+0.46 and HBHA 4202-22 lie behind the main Cygnus-X cloud. Although G79.29+0.46 may simply be on the far side of the cloud, HBHA 4202-22 is unrelated to the Cygnus-X star formation region.
  • We determined the flux ratios of the heavy and eccentric planet XO-3b to its parent star in the four IRAC bands of the Spitzer Space Telescope: 0.101% +- 0.004% at 3.6 micron; 0.143% +- 0.006% at 4.5 micron; 0.134% +- 0.049% at 5.8 micron and 0.150% +- 0.036% at 8.0 micron. The flux ratios are within [-2.2,0.3, -0.8, -1.7]-sigma of the model of XO-3b with a thermally inverted stratosphere in the 3.6 micron, 4.5 micron, 5.8 micron and 8.0 micron channels, respectively. XO-3b has a high illumination from its parent star (Fp ~(1.9 - 4.2) x 10^9 ergs cm^-2 s^-1) and is thus expected to have a thermal inversion, which we indeed observe. When combined with existing data for other planets, the correlation between the presence of an atmospheric temperature inversion and the substellar flux is insufficient to explain why some high insolation planets like TrES-3 do not have stratospheric inversions and some low insolation planets like XO-1b do have inversions. Secondary factors such as sulfur chemistry, atmospheric metallicity, amounts of macroscopic mixing in the stratosphere or even dynamical weather effects likely play a role. Using the secondary eclipse timing centroids we determined the orbital eccentricity of XO-3b as e = 0.277 +- 0.009. The model radius-age trajectories for XO-3b imply that at least some amount of tidal-heating is required to inflate the radius of XO-3b, and the tidal heating parameter of the planet is constrained to Qp < 10^6 .
  • We estimate flux ratios of the extrasolar planet XO-2b to its host star XO-2 at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 micron with IRAC on the Spitzer Space Telescope to be 0.00081 +- 0.00017, 0.00098 +- 0.00020, 0.00167 +- 0.00036 and 0.00133 +- 0.00049, respectively. The fluxes provide tentative evidence for a weak temperature inversion in the upper atmosphere, the precise nature of which would need to be confirmed by longer wavelength observations. XO-2b substellar flux of 0.76 x 10^9 ergs cm^-2 s^-1 lies in the predicted transition region between atmospheres with and without upper atmospheric temperature inversion.
  • Using the data obtained with the Spitzer Space telescope as part of the Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) legacy survey, we have studied the variations of the dust composition and abundance across the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Such variations are expected, as the explosive events which have lead to the formation of the many HI shells observed should have affected the dust properties. Using a model and comparing with a reference spectral energy distribution from our Galaxy, we deduce the relative abundance variations of small dust grains across the LMC. We examined the infrared color ratios as well as the relative abundances of very small grains (VSGs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) relative to the big grain (BG) abundance. Results show that each dust component could have different origins or evolution in the interstellar medium (ISM). The VSG abundance traces the star formation activity and could result from shattering of larger grains, whereas the PAH abundance increases around molecular clouds as well as in the stellar bar, where they could have been injected into the ISM during mass loss from old stars.
  • We present empirical relations describing excess emission from evolved stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using data from the SAGE (Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution) survey which includes the IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 \mu m and MIPS 24, 70 and 160 \mu m bands. We combine the SAGE data with the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS; J, H and Ks) and the optical Magellanic Cloud Photometric Survey (MCPS; U, B, V and I) point source catalogs to create complete spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star candidates in the LMC. AGB star outflows are among the main producers of dust in a galaxy, and this mass loss results in an excess in the fluxes observed in the 8 and 24 \mic m bands. We identify oxygen-rich, carbon-rich and extreme AGB star populations in our sample based on their 2MASS and IRAC colors. We calculate excesses fluxes in the mid-IR bands by comparison of the SEDs with model photospheres. We find about 16,000 O-rich, 6300 C-rich and 1000 extreme sources with reliable 8 \mu m excesses, and about 4500 O-rich, 5300 C-rich and 960 extreme sources with reliable 24 \mic m excesses. The excesses are in the range 0.1 mJy--5 Jy. The 8 and 24 \mic m excesses for all three types of AGB candidates show a general increasing trend with luminosity. The dust color temperature derived from the ratio of the 8 and 24 \mic m excesses decreases with an increase in excess, while the 24 \mic m optical depth increases with excess. The extreme AGB candidates are the major contributors to the mass loss, and we estimate the total AGB mass-loss return to the LMC to be (5.9--13)\times 10^{-3} Msun yr^{-1}.
  • We present several corrections for point source photometry to be applied to data from the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope. These corrections are necessary because of characteristics of the IRAC arrays and optics and the way the instrument is calibrated in-flight. When these corrections are applied, it is possible to achieve a ~2% relative photometric accuracy for sources of adequate signal to noise in an IRAC image.
  • We present images and initial results from our extensive Spitzer Space Telescope imaging survey of the W5 H II region with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS). We detect dense clusters of stars, centered on the O stars: HD 18326, BD +60 586, HD 17505 and HD 17520. At 24 microns substantial extended emission is visible, presumably from heated dust grains that survive in the strongly ionizing environment of the H {\sc ii} region. With photometry of more than 18000 point sources, we analyze the clustering properties of objects classified as young stars by their IR spectral energy distributions (a total of 2064 sources) across the region using a minimal-spanning-tree algorithm. We find ~40--70% of infrared excess sources belong to clusters with >10 members. We find that within the evacuated cavities of the H II regions that make up W5, the ratio of Class II to Class I sources is ~7 times higher than for objects coincident with molecular gas as traced by 12CO emission and near-IR extinction maps. We attribute this contrast to an age difference between the two locations, and postulate that at least two distinct generations of star formation are visible across W5. Our preliminary analysis shows that triggering is a plausible mechanism to explain the multiple generations of star formation in W5, and merits further investigation.
  • We have selected a small sample of post-AGB stars in transition towards the planetary nebula and present new Very Large Array multi-frequency high-angular resolution radio observations of them. The multi-frequency data are used to create and model the targets' radio continuum spectra, proving that these stars started their evolution as very young planetary nebulae. In the optically thin range, the slopes are compatible with the expected spectral index (-0.1). Two targets (IRAS 18062+2410 and 17423-1755) seem to be optically thick even at high frequency, as observed in a handful of other post-AGB stars in the literature, while a third one (IRAS 20462+3416) shows a possible contribution from cold dust. In IRAS 18062+2410, where we have three observations spanning a period of four years, we detect an increase in its flux density, similar to that observed in CRL 618. High-angular resolution imaging shows bipolar structures that may be due to circumstellar tori, although a different hypothesis (i.e., jets) could also explain the observations. Further observations and monitoring of these sources will enable us to test the current evolutionary models of planetary nebulae.
  • We estimate flux ratios of the extrasolar planet XO-1b to its host star XO-1 at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 microns with the IRAC on the Spitzer Space Telescope to be 0.00086 +/- 0.00007, 0.00122 +/- 0.00009, 0.00261 +/- 0.00031 and 0.00210 +/- 0.00029, respectively. The fluxes are inconsistent with a canonical cloudless model for the thermal emission from a planet and suggest an atmosphere with a thermal inversion layer and a possible stratospheric absorber. A newly emerging correlation between the presence of a thermal inversion layer in the planetary atmosphere and stellar insolation of the planet (Burrows et al. 2007b) is refined. The sub-stellar point flux from the parent star at XO-1b of ~ 0.49 x 10^9 erg cm^-2 s^-1 sets a new lower limit for the occurrence of a thermal inversion in a planetary atmosphere.
  • The high mass loss rates of stars in their asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stage of evolution is one of the most important pathways for mass return from stars to the ISM. In the planetary nebulae (PNe) phase, the ejected material is illuminated and can be altered by the UV radiation from the central star. PNe therefore play a significant role in the ISM recycling process and in changing the environment around them. We show some highlights of the results of observations that have been carried out using the Spitzer instruments to study the gas and dust emission from PNe in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies. Spitzer is especially sensitive to the cool dust and molecules in the PNe shell and halos. We present new results from our program on Galactic PNe, including IRAC and IRS observations of NGC 6720 in the ring and halo of that nebula.
  • The Spitzer Space Telescope, NASA's Great Observatory for infrared astronomy, has made available new tools for the investigation of the infrared properties of planetary nebulae. The three instruments onboard, including the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS), and the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), provide imaging capability from 3.6 to 160 microns, and low and moderate resolution spectroscopy from 5.2 to 38 microns. In this paper I review recent Spitzer results concerning planetary nebulae and their asymmetrical structures.
  • The Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) is a four-channel camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope, one of three focal plane science instruments. IRAC uses two pairs of 256x256 pixel InSb and Si:As IBC detectors to provide simultaneous imaging at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. IRAC experiences a flux of cosmic rays and solar protons that produce transient effects in science images from each of the arrays, with 4-6 pixels per second being affected during each integration. During extreme solar flares, IRAC experiences a much higher rate of transients which affects the science data quality. We present cosmic ray rates and observed detector characteristics for IRAC during the first two years of science operation, and rates observed in a period of elevated solar proton flux during an intense solar flare in January 2005. We show the changes to the IRAC detectors observed since launch, and assess their impacts to the science data quality.
  • We have mapped the Helix (NGC 7293) planetary nebula (PN) with the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The Helix is one of the closest bright PN, and therefore provides an opportunity to resolve the small-scale structure in the nebula. The emission from this PN in the 5.8 and 8 micron IRAC bands is dominated by the pure rotational lines of molecular hydrogen, with a smaller contribution from forbidden line emission such as [Ar III] in the ionized region. The IRAC images resolve the "cometary knots" which have been previously studied in this PN. The "tails" of the knots and the radial rays extending into the outer regions of the PN are seen in emission in the IRAC bands. IRS spectra on the main ring and the emission in the IRAC bands are consistent with shock-excited H2 models, with a small (~10%) component from photodissociation regions. In the Northeast Arc, the H2 emission is located in a shell outside of the H alpha emission.