• This paper describes the data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey conducted between 2005 and 2007. Light curves, spectra, classifications, and ancillary data are presented for 10,258 variable and transient sources discovered through repeat ugriz imaging of SDSS Stripe 82, a 300 deg2 area along the celestial equator. This data release is comprised of all transient sources brighter than r~22.5 mag with no history of variability prior to 2004. Dedicated spectroscopic observations were performed on a subset of 889 transients, as well as spectra for thousands of transient host galaxies using the SDSS-III BOSS spectrographs. Photometric classifications are provided for the candidates with good multi-color light curves that were not observed spectroscopically. From these observations, 4607 transients are either spectroscopically confirmed, or likely to be, supernovae, making this the largest sample of supernova candidates ever compiled. We present a new method for SN host-galaxy identification and derive host-galaxy properties including stellar masses, star-formation rates, and the average stellar population ages from our SDSS multi-band photometry. We derive SALT2 distance moduli for a total of 1443 SN Ia with spectroscopic redshifts as well as photometric redshifts for a further 677 purely-photometric SN Ia candidates. Using the spectroscopically confirmed subset of the three-year SDSS-II SN Ia sample and assuming a flat Lambda-CDM cosmology, we determine Omega_M = 0.315 +/- 0.093 (statistical error only) and detect a non-zero cosmological constant at 5.7 sigmas.
  • We used the GMBCG galaxy cluster catalogue and SDSS-II supernovae data with redshifts measured by the BOSS project to identify 48 SNe Ia residing in rich galaxy clusters and compare their properties with 1015 SNe Ia in the field. Their light curves were parametrised by the SALT2 model and the significance of the observed differences was assessed by a resampling technique. To test our samples and methods, we first looked for known differences between SNe Ia residing in active and passive galaxies. We confirm that passive galaxies host SNe Ia with smaller stretch, weaker colour-luminosity relation [$\beta$ of 2.54(22) against 3.35(14)], and that are $\sim$ 0.1 mag more luminous after stretch and colour corrections. We show that only 0.02 per cent of random samples drawn from our set of SNe Ia in active galaxies can reach these values. Reported differences in the Hubble residuals scatter could not be detected, possibly due to the exclusion of outliers. We then show that, while most field and cluster SNe Ia properties are compatible at the current level, their stretch distributions are different ($\sim3\sigma$): besides having a higher concentration of passive galaxies than the field, the cluster's passive galaxies host SNe Ia with an average stretch even smaller than those in field passive galaxies (at 95 per cent confidence). We argue that the older age of passive galaxies in clusters is responsible for this effect since, as we show, old passive galaxies host SNe Ia with smaller stretch than young passive galaxies ($\sim4\sigma$).
  • Using a sample of 608 Type Ia supernovae from the SDSS-II and BOSS surveys, combined with a sample of foreground galaxies from SDSS-II, we estimate the weak lensing convergence for each supernova line-of-sight. We find that the correlation between this measurement and the Hubble residuals is consistent with the prediction from lensing (at a significance of 1.7sigma. Strong correlations are also found between the residuals and supernova nuisance parameters after a linear correction is applied. When these other correlations are taken into account, the lensing signal is detected at 1.4sigma. We show for the first time that distance estimates from supernovae can be improved when lensing is incorporated by including a new parameter in the SALT2 methodology for determining distance moduli. The recovered value of the new parameter is consistent with the lensing prediction. Using CMB data from WMAP7, H0 data from HST and SDSS BAO measurements, we find the best-fit value of the new lensing parameter and show that the central values and uncertainties on Omega_m and w are unaffected. The lensing of supernovae, while only seen at marginal significance in this low redshift sample, will be of vital importance for the next generation of surveys, such as DES and LSST, which will be systematics dominated.
  • We present the spectroscopy from 5254 galaxies that hosted supernovae (SNe) or other transient events in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II). Obtained during SDSS-I, SDSS-II, and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), this sample represents the largest systematic, unbiased, magnitude limited spectroscopic survey of supernova (SN) host galaxies. Using the host galaxy redshifts, we test the impact of photometric SN classification based on SDSS imaging data with and without using spectroscopic redshifts of the host galaxies. Following our suggested scheme, there are a total of 1166 photometrically classified SNe Ia when using a flat redshift prior and 1126 SNe Ia when the host spectroscopic redshift is assumed. For 1024 (87.8%) candidates classified as likely SNe Ia without redshift information, we find that the classification is unchanged when adding the host galaxy redshift. Using photometry from SDSS imaging data and the host galaxy spectra, we also report host galaxy properties for use in future nalysis of SN astrophysics. Finally, we investigate the differences in the interpretation of the light curve properties with and without knowledge of the redshift. When using the SALT2 light curve fitter, we find a 21% increase in the number of fits that converge when using the spectroscopic redshift. Without host galaxy redshifts, we find that SALT2 light curve fits are systematically biased towards lower photometric redshift estimates and redder colors in the limit of low signal-to-noise data. The general improvements in performance of the light curve fitter and the increased diversity of the host galaxy sample highlights the importance of host galaxy spectroscopy for current photometric SN surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and future surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.
  • We present the cosmological analysis of 752 photometrically-classified Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained from the full Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova (SN) Survey, supplemented with host-galaxy spectroscopy from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Our photometric-classification method is based on the SN typing technique of Sako et al. (2011), aided by host galaxy redshifts (0.05<z<0.55). SNANA simulations of our methodology estimate that we have a SN Ia typing efficiency of 70.8%, with only 3.9% contamination from core-collapse (non-Ia) SNe. We demonstrate that this level of contamination has no effect on our cosmological constraints. We quantify and correct for our selection effects (e.g., Malmquist bias) using simulations. When fitting to a flat LambdaCDM cosmological model, we find that our photometric sample alone gives omega_m=0.24+0.07-0.05 (statistical errors only). If we relax the constraint on flatness, then our sample provides competitive joint statistical constraints on omega_m and omega_lambda, comparable to those derived from the spectroscopically-confirmed three-year Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS3). Using only our data, the statistics-only result favors an accelerating universe at 99.96% confidence. Assuming a constant wCDM cosmological model, and combining with H0, CMB and LRG data, we obtain w=-0.96+0.10-0.10, omega_m=0.29+0.02-0.02 and omega_k=0.00+0.03-0.02 (statistical errors only), which is competitive with similar spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia analyses. Overall this comparison is re-assuring, considering the lower redshift leverage of the SDSS-II SN sample (z<0.55) and the lack of spectroscopic confirmation used herein. These results demonstrate the potential of photometrically-classified SNe Ia samples in improving cosmological constraints.
  • The combination of multiple cosmological probes can produce measurements of cosmological parameters much more stringent than those possible with any individual probe. We examine the combination of two highly correlated probes of late-time structure growth: (i) weak gravitational lensing from a survey with photometric redshifts and (ii) galaxy clustering and redshift space distortions from a survey with spectroscopic redshifts. We choose generic survey designs so that our results are applicable to a range of current and future photometric redshift (e.g. KiDS, DES, HSC, Euclid) and spectroscopic redshift (e.g. DESI, 4MOST, Sumire) surveys. Combining the surveys greatly improves their power to measure both dark energy and modified gravity. An independent, non-overlapping combination sees a dark energy figure of merit more than 4 times larger than that produced by either survey alone. The powerful synergies between the surveys are strongest for modified gravity, where their constraints are orthogonal, producing a non-overlapping joint figure of merit nearly 2 orders of magnitude larger than either alone. Our projected angular power spectrum formalism makes it easy to model the cross-correlation observable when the surveys overlap on the sky, producing a joint data vector and full covariance matrix. We calculate a same-sky improvement factor, from the inclusion of these cross-correlations, relative to non-overlapping surveys. We find nearly a factor of 4 for dark energy and more than a factor of 2 for modified gravity. The exact forecast figures of merit and same-sky benefits can be radically affected by a range of forecasts assumption, which we explore methodically in a sensitivity analysis. We show that that our fiducial assumptions produce robust results which give a good average picture of the science return from combining photometric and spectroscopic surveys.
  • With SDSS galaxy data and halo data from up-to-date N-body simulations we construct a semi-empirical catalog (SEC) of early-type systems by making a self-consistent bivariate statistical match of stellar mass (M_star) and velocity dispersion (sigma) with halo virial mass (M_vir). We then assign stellar mass profile and velocity dispersion profile parameters to each system in the SEC using their observed correlations with M_star and sigma. Simultaneously, we solve for dark matter density profile of each halo using the spherical Jeans equation. The resulting dark matter density profiles deviate in general from the dissipationless profile of NFW or Einasto and their mean inner density slope and concentration vary systematically with M_vir. Statistical tests of the distribution of profiles at fixed M_vir rule out the null hypothesis that it follows the distribution predicted by N-body simulations for M_vir ~< 10^{13.5-14.5} M_solar. These dark matter profiles imply that dark matter density is, on average, enhanced significantly in the inner region of halos with M_vir ~< 10^{13.5-14.5} M_solar supporting halo contraction. The main characteristics of halo contraction are: (1) the mean dark matter density within the effective radius has increased by a factor varying systematically up to ~ 3-4 at M_vir = 10^{12} M_solar, and (2) the inner density slope has a mean of <alpha> ~ 1.3 with rho(r) ~ r^{-alpha} and a halo-to-halo rms scatter of rms(alpha) ~ 0.4-0.5 for 10^{12} M_solar ~< M_vir ~< 10^{13-14} M_solar steeper than the NFW profile (alpha=1). Based on our results we predict that halos of nearby elliptical and lenticular galaxies can, in principle, be promising targets for gamma-ray emission from dark matter annihilation.
  • Telescope Point Spread Function (PSF) quality is critical for realising the potential of cosmic weak lensing observations to constrain dark energy and test General Relativity. In this paper we use quantitative weak gravitational lensing measures to inform the precision of lens optical alignment, with specific reference to the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We compute optics spot diagrams and calculate the shear and flexion of the PSF as a function of position on the focal plane. For perfect optical alignment we verify the high quality of the DES optical design, finding a maximum PSF contribution to the weak lensing shear of 0.04 near the edge of the focal plane. However this can be increased by a factor of approximately three if the lenses are only just aligned within their maximum specified tolerances. We calculate the E and B-mode shear and flexion variance as a function of de-centre or tilt of each lens in turn. We find tilt accuracy to be a few times more important than de-centre, depending on the lens considered. Finally we consider the compound effect of de-centre and tilt of multiple lenses simultaneously, by sampling from a plausible range of values of each parameter. We find that the compound effect can be around twice as detrimental as when considering any one lens alone. Furthermore, this combined effect changes the conclusions about which lens is most important to align accurately. For DES, the tilt of the first two lenses is the most important.
  • We present the final statistical sample of lensed quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). The well-defined statistical lens sample consists of 26 lensed quasars brighter than i=19.1 and in the redshift range of 0.6<z<2.2 selected from 50,836 spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7), where we restrict the image separation range to 1"<\theta<20" and the i-band magnitude differences in two image lenses to be smaller than 1.25 mag. The SDSS DR7 quasar catalog also contains 36 additional lenses identified with various techniques. In addition to these lensed quasars, we have identified 81 pairs of quasars from follow-up spectroscopy, 26 of which are physically associated binary quasars. The statistical lens sample covers a wide range of image separations, redshifts, and magnitudes, and therefore is suitable for systematic studies of cosmological parameters and surveys of the structure and evolution of galaxies and quasars.
  • We present a statistical analysis of the final lens sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). The number distribution of a complete subsample of 19 lensed quasars selected from 50,836 source quasars is compared with theoretical expectations, with particular attention to the selection function. Assuming that the velocity function of galaxies does not evolve with redshift, the SQLS sample constrains the cosmological constant to \Omega_\Lambda=0.79^{+0.06}_{-0.07}(stat.)^{+0.06}_{-0.06}(syst.) for a flat universe. The dark energy equation of state is found to be consistent with w=-1 when the SQLS is combined with constraints from baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements or results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We also obtain simultaneous constraints on cosmological parameters and redshift evolution of the galaxy velocity function, finding no evidence for redshift evolution at z<1 in any combinations of constraints. For instance, number density evolution quantified as \nu_n=d\ln\phi_*/d\ln(1+z) and the velocity dispersion evolution \nu_\sigma=d\ln\sigma_*/d\ln(1+z) are constrained to \nu_n=1.06^{+1.36}_{-1.39}(stat.)^{+0.33}_{-0.64}(syst.) and \nu_\sigma=-0.05^{+0.19}_{-0.16}(stat.)^{+0.03}_{-0.03}(syst.) respectively when the SQLS result is combined with BAO and WMAP for flat models with a cosmological constant. We find that a significant amount of dark energy is preferred even after fully marginalizing over the galaxy evolution parameters. Thus the statistics of lensed quasars robustly confirm the accelerated cosmic expansion.
  • Statistical emulators of computer simulators have proven to be useful in a variety of applications. The widely adopted model for emulator building, using a Gaussian process model with strictly positive correlation function, is computationally intractable when the number of simulator evaluations is large. We propose a new model that uses a combination of low-order regression terms and compactly supported correlation functions to recreate the desired predictive behavior of the emulator at a fraction of the computational cost. Following the usual approach of taking the correlation to be a product of correlations in each input dimension, we show how to impose restrictions on the ranges of the correlations, giving sparsity, while also allowing the ranges to trade off against one another, thereby giving good predictive performance. We illustrate the method using data from a computer simulator of photometric redshift with 20,000 simulator evaluations and 80,000 predictions.
  • We present Keck high-quality rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) through optical spectra of 21 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the redshift range 0.11 < z < 0.37 and a mean redshift of 0.22 that were discovered during the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) SN Survey. Using the broad-band photometry of the SDSS survey, we are able to reconstruct the SN host-galaxy spectral energy distributions (SEDs), allowing for a correction for the host-galaxy contamination in the SN Ia spectra. Comparison of composite spectra constructed from a subsample of 17 high-quality spectra to those created from a low-redshift sample with otherwise similar properties shows that the Keck/SDSS SNe Ia have, on average, extremely similar rest-frame optical spectra but show a UV flux excess. This observation is confirmed by comparing synthesized broad-band colors of the individual spectra, showing a difference in mean colors at the 2.4 - 4.4 sigma level for various UV colors. We further see a slight difference in the UV spectral shape between SNe with low-mass and high-mass host galaxies. Additionally, we detect a relationship between the flux ratio at 2770 and 2900 A and peak luminosity that differs from that observed at low redshift. We find that changing the UV SED of an SN Ia within the observed dispersion can change the inferred distance moduli by ~0.1 mag. This effect only occurs when the data probe the rest-frame UV. We suggest that this discrepancy could be due to differences in the host-galaxy population of the two SN samples or to small-sample statistics.
  • We examine the correlation between supernova host galaxy properties and their residuals on the Hubble diagram. We use supernovae discovered during the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II - Supernova Survey, and focus on objects at a redshift of z < 0.15, where the selection effects of the survey are known to yield a complete Type Ia supernova sample. To minimize the bias in our analysis with respect to measured host-galaxy properties, spectra were obtained for nearly all hosts, spanning a range in magnitude of -23 < M_r < -17. In contrast to previous works that use photometric estimates of host mass as a proxy for global metallicity, we analyze host-galaxy spectra to obtain gas-phase metallicities and star-formation rates from host galaxies with active star formation. From a final sample of ~ 40 emission-line galaxies, we find that light-curve corrected Type Ia supernovae are ~ 0.1 magnitudes brighter in high-metallicity hosts than in low-metallicity hosts. We also find a significant (> 3{\sigma}) correlation between the Hubble residuals of Type Ia supernovae and the specific star-formation rate of the host galaxy. We comment on the importance of supernova/host-galaxy correlations as a source of systematic bias in future deep supernova surveys.
  • We improve estimates of stellar mass and mass-weighted average age of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) host galaxies by combining UV and near-IR photometry with optical photometry in our analysis. Using 206 SNe Ia drawn from the full three-year SDSS-II Supernova Survey (median redshift of z {\approx} 0.2) and multi-wavelength host-galaxy photometry from SDSS, GALEX, and UKIDSS, we present evidence of a correlation (1.9{\sigma} confidence level) between the residuals of SNe Ia about the best-fit Hubble relation and the mass-weighted average age of their host galaxies. The trend is such that older galaxies host SNe Ia that are brighter than average after standard light-curve corrections are made. We also confirm, at the 3.0{\sigma} level, the trend seen by previous studies that more massive galaxies often host brighter SNe Ia after light-curve correction.
  • We measure the luminosity and color dependence of galaxy clustering in the SDSS DR7 main galaxy sample, focusing on the projected correlation function w_p(r_p) of volume-limited samples. We interpret our measurements using halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling assuming a Lambda-CDM cosmology. The amplitude of w_p(r_p) grows slowly with luminosity for L < L_* and increases sharply at higher luminosities, with bias factor b(>L)=1.06+0.23(L/L_*)^{1.12}. At fixed luminosity, redder galaxies have a stronger and steeper w_p(r_p), a trend that runs steadily from the bluest galaxies to the reddest galaxies. The individual luminosity trends for the red and blue galaxy populations are strikingly different. Blue galaxies show a slow but steady increase of w_p(r_p) with luminosity, at all scales. The large-scale clustering of red galaxies shows little luminosity dependence until a sharp increase at L > 4L_*, but the lowest luminosity red galaxies (0.04-0.25 L_*) show very strong clustering on scales r_p < 2 Mpc/h. Most of the observed trends can be naturally understood within the LCDM+HOD framework. The growth of w_p(r_p) with luminosity reflects an overall shift in the halo mass scale, in particular an increase in the minimum host halo mass Mmin. The mass at which a halo has, on average, one satellite galaxy brighter than L is M_1 ~ 17 Mmin(L) over most of the luminosity range. The growth and steepening of w_p(r_p) for redder galaxies reflects the increasing fraction of galaxies that are satellite systems in high mass halos instead of central systems in low mass halos, a trend that is especially marked at low luminosities. Our extensive measurements, provided in tabular form, will allow detailed tests of theoretical models of galaxy formation, a firm grounding of semi-empirical models of the galaxy population, and new cosmological tests.
  • We present the temporal evolution of line profiles ranging from near ultraviolet to optical wavelengths by analyzing 59 Subaru telescope spectra of normal Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) in the intermediate redshift range (0.05 < z < 0.4) discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. We derive line velocities, peak wavelengths and pseudo-equivalent widths (pEWs) of these lines. Additionally, we compare the line profiles around the date of maximum brightness with those from their nearby counterparts. We find that line profiles represented by their velocities and pEWs for intermediate redshift SNe Ia are consistent with their nearby counterparts within 2 $\sigma$. These findings support the picture that SNe Ia are a "standard" candle for the intermediate redshift range as has been shown between SNe Ia at nearby and high redshifts. There is a hint that the "MgII \lambda 4300" pEW distribution for intermediate redshift SNe Ia is larger than for the nearby sample, which could be interpreted as a difference in the progenitor abundance.
  • We report results from the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge (SNPCC), a publicly released mix of simulated supernovae (SNe), with types (Ia, Ibc, and II) selected in proportion to their expected rate. The simulation was realized in the griz filters of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) with realistic observing conditions (sky noise, point-spread function and atmospheric transparency) based on years of recorded conditions at the DES site. Simulations of non-Ia type SNe are based on spectroscopically confirmed light curves that include unpublished non-Ia samples donated from the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP), the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS), and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II). A spectroscopically confirmed subset was provided for training. We challenged scientists to run their classification algorithms and report a type and photo-z for each SN. Participants from 10 groups contributed 13 entries for the sample that included a host-galaxy photo-z for each SN, and 9 entries for the sample that had no redshift information. Several different classification strategies resulted in similar performance, and for all entries the performance was significantly better for the training subset than for the unconfirmed sample. For the spectroscopically unconfirmed subset, the entry with the highest average figure of merit for classifying SNe~Ia has an efficiency of 0.96 and an SN~Ia purity of 0.79. As a public resource for the future development of photometric SN classification and photo-z estimators, we have released updated simulations with improvements based on our experience from the SNPCC, added samples corresponding to the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and the SDSS, and provided the answer keys so that developers can evaluate their own analysis.
  • From the set of nearly 500 spectroscopically confirmed type~Ia supernovae and around 10,000 unconfirmed candidates from SDSS-II, we select a subset of 108 confirmed SNe Ia with well-observed early-time light curves to search for signatures from shock interaction of the supernova with a companion star. No evidence for shock emission is seen; however, the cadence and photometric noise could hide a weak shock signal. We simulate shocked light curves using SN Ia templates and a simple, Gaussian shock model to emulate the noise properties of the SDSS-II sample and estimate the detectability of the shock interaction signal as a function of shock amplitude, shock width, and shock fraction. We find no direct evidence for shock interaction in the rest-frame $B$-band, but place an upper limit on the shock amplitude at 9% of supernova peak flux ($M_B > -16.6$ mag). If the single degenerate channel dominates type~Ia progenitors, this result constrains the companion stars to be less than about 6 $M_{\odot}$ on the main sequence, and strongly disfavors red giant companions.
  • We present an analysis of the host galaxy dependencies of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the full three year sample of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. We rediscover, to high significance, the strong correlation between host galaxy typeand the width of the observed SN light curve, i.e., fainter, quickly declining SNe Ia favor passive host galaxies, while brighter, slowly declining Ia's favor star-forming galaxies. We also find evidence (at between 2 to 3 sigma) that SNe Ia are ~0.1 magnitudes brighter in passive host galaxies, than in star-forming hosts, after the SN Ia light curves have been standardized using the light curve shape and color variations: This difference in brightness is present in both the SALT2 and MCLS2k2 light curve fitting methodologies. We see evidence for differences in the SN Ia color relationship between passive and star-forming host galaxies, e.g., for the MLCS2k2 technique, we see that SNe Ia in passive hosts favor a dust law of R_V ~1, while SNe Ia in star-forming hosts require R_V ~2. The significance of these trends depends on the range of SN colors considered. We demonstrate that these effects can be parameterized using the stellar mass of the host galaxy (with a confidence of >4 sigma) and including this extra parameter provides a better statistical fit to our data. Our results suggest that future cosmological analyses of SN Ia samples should include host galaxy information.
  • We present multi-band photometry and multi-epoch spectroscopy of the peculiar Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2007qd, discovered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. It possesses physical properties intermediate to those of the peculiar SN 2002cx and the extremely low-luminosity SN 2008ha. Optical photometry indicates that it had an extraordinarily fast rise time of <= 10 days and a peak absolute B magnitude of -15.4 +/- 0.2 at most, making it one of the most subluminous SN Ia ever observed. Follow-up spectroscopy of SN 2007qd near maximum brightness unambiguously shows the presence of intermediate-mass elements which are likely caused by carbon/oxygen nuclear burning. Near maximum brightness, SN 2007qd had a photospheric velocity of only 2800 km/s, similar to that of SN 2008ha but about 4000 and 7000 km/s less than that of SN 2002cx and normal SN Ia, respectively. We show that the peak luminosities of SN 2002cx-like objects are highly correlated with both their light-curve stretch and photospheric velocities. Its strong apparent connection to other SN 2002cx-like events suggests that SN 2007qd is also a pure deflagration of a white dwarf, although other mechanisms cannot be ruled out. It may be a critical link between SN 2008ha and the other members of the SN 2002cx-like class of objects.
  • We present the second report of our systematic search for strongly lensed quasars from the data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). From extensive follow-up observations of 136 candidate objects, we find 36 lenses in the full sample of 77,429 spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the SDSS Data Release 5. We then define a complete sample of 19 lenses, including 11 from our previous search in the SDSS Data Release 3, from the sample of 36,287 quasars with i<19.1 in the redshift range 0.6<z<2.2, where we require the lenses to have image separations of 1"<\theta<20" and i-band magnitude differences between the two images smaller than 1.25 mag. Among the 19 lensed quasars, 3 have quadruple-image configurations, while the remaining 16 show double images. This lens sample constrains the cosmological constant to be \Omega_\Lambda=0.84^{+0.06}_{-0.08}(stat.)^{+0.09}_{-0.07}(syst.) assuming a flat universe, which is in good agreement with other cosmological observations. We also report the discoveries of 7 binary quasars with separations ranging from 1.1" to 16.6", which are identified in the course of our lens survey. This study concludes the construction of our statistical lens sample in the full SDSS-I data set.
  • Large planned photometric surveys will discover hundreds of thousands of supernovae (SNe), outstripping the resources available for spectroscopic follow-up and necessitating the development of purely photometric methods to exploit these events for cosmological study. We present a light-curve fitting technique for SN Ia photometric redshift (photo-z) estimation in which the redshift is determined simultaneously with the other fit parameters. We implement this "LCFIT+Z" technique within the frameworks of the MLCS2k2 and SALT-II light-curve fit methods and determine the precision on the redshift and distance modulus. This method is applied to a spectroscopically confirmed sample of 296 SNe Ia from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey and 37 publicly available SNe Ia from the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). We have also applied the method to a large suite of realistic simulated light curves for existing and planned surveys, including SDSS, SNLS, and LSST. When intrinsic SN color fluctuations are included, the photo-z precision for the simulation is consistent with that in the data. Finally, we compare the LCFIT+Z photo-z precision with previous results using color-based SN photo-z estimates.
  • Traditionally, inflationary models are analyzed in terms of parameters such as the scalar spectral index ns and the tensor to scalar ratio r, while dark energy models are studied in terms of the equation of state parameter w. Motivated by the fact that both deal with periods of accelerated expansion, we study the evolution of w during inflation, in order to derive observational constraints on its value during an earlier epoch likely dominated by a dynamic form of dark energy. We find that the cosmic microwave background and large-scale structure data is consistent with w_inflation=-1 and provides an upper limit of 1+w <~ 0.02. Nonetheless, an exact de Sitter expansion with a constant w=-1 is disfavored since this would result in ns=1.
  • We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The adopted sample of supernovae (SNe) includes 516 SNe Ia at redshift z \lesssim 0.3, of which 270 (52%) are spectroscopically identified as SNe Ia. The remaining 246 SNe Ia were identified through their light curves; 113 of these objects have spectroscopic redshifts from spectra of their host galaxy, and 133 have photometric redshifts estimated from the SN light curves. Based on consideration of 87 spectroscopically confirmed non-Ia SNe discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey, we estimate that 2.04+1.61-0.95 % of the photometric SNe Ia may be misidentified. The sample of SNe Ia used in this measurement represents an order of magnitude increase in the statistics for SN Ia rate measurements in the redshift range covered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. If we assume a SN Ia rate that is constant at low redshift (z < 0.15), then the SN observations can be used to infer a value of the SN rate of rV = (2.69+0.34+0.21-0.30-0.01) x10^{-5} SNe yr^{-1} Mpc-3 (H0 /(70 km s^{-1} Mpc^{-1}))^{3} at a mean redshift of ~ 0.12, based on 79 SNe Ia of which 72 are spectroscopically confirmed. However, the large sample of SNe Ia included in this study allows us to place constraints on the redshift dependence of the SN Ia rate based on the SDSS-II Supernova Survey data alone. Fitting a power-law model of the SN rate evolution, r_V(z) = A_p x ((1 + z)/(1 + z0))^{\nu}, over the redshift range 0.0 < z < 0.3 with z0 = 0.21, results in A_p = (3.43+0.15-0.15) x 10^{-5} SNe yr^{-1} Mpc-3 (H0 /(70 km s^{-1} Mpc^{-1}))^{3} and \nu = 2.04+0.90-0.89.
  • ABRIDGED We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z <0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 < z < 0.3$. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of $({0.37}^{+0.17+0.01}_{-0.12-0.01}) \mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ and $({0.55}^{+0.13+0.02}_{-0.11-0.01}) \mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ ($\mathrm{SNu}x = 10^{-12} L_{x\sun}^{-1} \mathrm{yr}^{-1}$) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be $({0.31}^{+0.18+0.01}_{-0.12-0.01}) \mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ and $({0.49}^{+0.15+0.02}_{-0.11-0.01})$ $\mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be $({2.04}^{+1.99+0.07}_{-1.11-0.04}) \mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ and $({0.36}^{+0.84+0.01}_{-0.30-0.01}) \mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ in C4 and maxBCG clusters. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is ${1.94}^{+1.31+0.043}_{-0.91-0.015}$ and ${3.02}^{+1.31+0.062}_{-1.03-0.048}$, for C4 and maxBCG clusters. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift...shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find $r_{L} = $ $[(0.49^{+0.15}_{-0.14}) +$ $(0.91^{+0.85}_{-0.81}) \times z]$ $\mathrm{SNu}B$ $h^{2}$. A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies... we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe that are hostless to be $(9.4^+8._3-5.1)%$.