• We explore the phase-space structure of nearby halo stars identified kinematically from Gaia DR2 data. We focus on their distribution in velocity and in "integrals of motion" space as well as on their photometric properties. Our sample of stars selected to be moving at a relative velocity of at least 210 km/s with respect to the Local Standard of Rest, contains an important contribution from the low rotational velocity tail of the disk(s). The $V_R$-distribution of these stars depicts a small asymmetry similar to that seen for the faster rotating thin disk stars near the Sun. We also identify a prominent, slightly retrograde "blob", which traces the metal-poor halo main sequence reported by Gaia Collaboration et al. (2018d). We also find many small clumps especially noticeable in the tails of the velocity distribution of the stars in our sample. Their HR diagrams disclose narrow sequences characteristic of simple stellar populations. This stream-frosting confirms predictions from cosmological simulations, namely that substructure is most apparent amongst the fastest moving stars, typically reflecting more recent accretion events.
  • There is long tradition extending more than a century on the identification of moving groups in the Solar neighborhood. However, with the advent of large kinematic surveys, and especially of the upcoming Gaia data releases there is a need for more sophisticated and automated substructure finders. We analyze the TGASxRAVE dataset to identify moving groups in the Galactic disk. These groups of stars may then be used to map dynamical and star formation processes in the vicinity of the Sun. We use the ROCKSTAR algorithm, a "friends-of-friends"-like substructure finder in 6D phase-space, and analyze the Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams of the groups identified. We find 125 moving groups within 300 pc of the Sun, containing on average 50 stars, and with 3D velocity dispersions smaller than 10 km/s. Most of these groups were previously unknown. Our photometric analysis allows us to isolate a subsample of 30 statistically significant groups likely composed of stars that were born together.
  • Stellar halos contain tracers of the assembly history of massive galaxies like our own. Exploiting the synergy between the TGAS and the spectroscopic RAVE surveys, Helmi et al. (2017) recently discovered several distinct substructures in the Solar neighbourhood, defined in integrals of motion space. Some of these substructures may be examples of the building blocks that built up the stellar halo. We analyse the chemical properties of stars in these substructures, with focus on their iron and $\alpha$-element abundances as provided by the RAVE survey chemical pipeline. We perform comparisons of the \feh and \mgfe distributions of the substructures to that of the entire halo sample defined in the TGAS$\times$RAVE dataset.We find that over half of the nine substructures have $\sigma_{\text{[Fe/H]}} \leq 0.3$~dex. Two of the substructures have $\sigma_{\text{[Fe/H]}} \leq 0.1$~dex, which makes them possible remnants of disrupted globular clusters. As expected most substructures and the vast majority of our stellar halo sample are $\alpha$-enhanced. Only one substructure shows a distinct [Mg/Fe] vs [Fe/H] abundance trend distinct from the rest of the halo stars in our sample.
  • Extended stellar haloes are a natural by-product of the hierarchical formation of massive galaxies. If merging is a non-negligible factor in the growth of our Galaxy, evidence of such events should be encoded in its stellar halo. Reliable identification of genuine halo stars is a challenging task however. The 1st Gaia data release contains the positions, parallaxes and proper motions for over 2 million stars, mostly in the Solar neighbourhood. Gaia DR2 will enlarge this sample to over 1.5 billion stars, the brightest ~5 million of which will have a full phase-space information. Our aim is to develop a machine learning model to reliably identify halo stars, even when their full phase-space information is not available. We use the Gradient Boosted Trees algorithm to build a supervised halo star classifier. The classifier is trained on a sample extracted from the Gaia Universe Model Snapshot, convolved with the errors of TGAS, as well as with the expected uncertainties of the upcoming Gaia DR2. We also trained our classifier on the cross-match between the TGAS and RAVE catalogues, where the halo stars are labelled in an entirely model independent way. We then use this model to identify halo stars in TGAS. When full phase- space information is available and for Gaia DR2-like uncertainties, our classifier is able to recover 90% of the halo stars with at most 30% distance errors, in a completely unseen test set, and with negligible levels of contamination. When line-of-sight velocity is not available, we recover ~60% of such halo stars, with less than 10% contamination. When applied to the TGAS data, our classifier detects 337 high confidence RGB halo stars. Although small, this number is consistent with the expectation from models given the data uncertainties. The large parallax errors are the biggest limitation to identify a larger number of halo stars in all the cases studied.
  • We study the dynamical properties of halo stars located in the Solar Neighbourhood. Our goal is to explore how the properties of the halo depend on the selection criteria used for defining a sample of halo stars. Once this is understood we proceed to measure the shape and orientation of the halo's velocity ellipsoid and we use this information to put constraints on the gravitational potential of the Galaxy. We use the recently released Gaia DR1 catalogue cross-matched to the RAVE dataset for our analysis. We develop a dynamical criterion based on the distribution function of stars in various Galactic components, using action integrals to identify halo members, and compare this to metallicity and to kinematically selected samples. With this new method, we find 1156 stars in the Solar Neighbourhood to be likely members of the stellar halo. Our dynamically selected sample consists mainly of distant giants on elongated orbits. Their metallicity distribution is rather broad, with roughly half of the stars having [M/H] $\ge -1$ dex. The use of different selection criteria has an important impact on the characteristics of the velocity distributions obtained. Nonetheless, for our dynamically selected and for the metallicity selected samples, we find the local velocity ellipsoid to be aligned in spherical coordinates in a Galactocentric reference frame: this suggests that the total gravitational potential is rather spherical in the region spanned by the orbits of the halo stars in these samples.
  • We present a new Python library called vaex, to handle extremely large tabular datasets, such as astronomical catalogues like the Gaia catalogue, N-body simulations or any other regular datasets which can be structured in rows and columns. Fast computations of statistics on regular N-dimensional grids allows analysis and visualization in the order of a billion rows per second. We use streaming algorithms, memory mapped files and a zero memory copy policy to allow exploration of datasets larger than memory, e.g. out-of-core algorithms. Vaex allows arbitrary (mathematical) transformations using normal Python expressions and (a subset of) numpy functions which are lazily evaluated and computed when needed in small chunks, which avoids wasting of RAM. Boolean expressions (which are also lazily evaluated) can be used to explore subsets of the data, which we call selections. Vaex uses a similar DataFrame API as Pandas, a very popular library, which helps migration from Pandas. Visualization is one of the key points of vaex, and is done using binned statistics in 1d (e.g. histogram), in 2d (e.g. 2d histograms with colormapping) and 3d (using volume rendering). Vaex is split in in several packages: vaex-core for the computational part, vaex-viz for visualization mostly based on matplotlib, vaex-jupyter for visualization in the Jupyter notebook/lab based in IPyWidgets, vaex-server for the (optional) client-server communication, vaex-ui for the Qt based interface, vaex-hdf5 for hdf5 based memory mapped storage, vaex-astro for astronomy related selections, transformations and memory mapped (column based) fits storage. Vaex is open source and available under MIT license on github, documentation and other information can be found on the main website: https://vaex.io, https://docs.vaex.io or https://github.com/maartenbreddels/vaex
  • The hierarchical structure formation model predicts that stellar halos should form, at least partly, via mergers. If this was a predominant formation channel for the Milky Way's halo, imprints of this merger history in the form of moving groups or streams should exist also in the vicinity of the Sun. Here we study the kinematics of halo stars in the Solar neighbourhood using the very recent first data release from the Gaia mission, and in particular the TGAS dataset, in combination with data from the RAVE survey. Our aim is to determine the amount of substructure present in the phase-space distribution of halo stars that could be linked to merger debris. To characterise kinematic substructure, we measure the velocity correlation function in our sample of halo (low metallicity) stars. We also study the distribution of these stars in the space of energy and two components of the angular momentum, in what we call "Integrals of Motion" space. The velocity correlation function reveals substructure in the form of an excess of pairs of stars with similar velocities, well above that expected for a smooth distribution. Comparison to cosmological simulations of the formation of stellar halos indicate that the levels found are consistent with the Galactic halo having been built fully via accretion. Similarly, the distribution of stars in the space of "Integrals of motion" is highly complex. A strikingly high fraction (between 58% and upto 73%) of the stars that are somewhat less bound than the Sun are on (highly) retrograde orbits. A simple comparison to Milky Way-mass galaxies in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations suggests that less than 1% have such prominently retrograde outer halos. We also identify several other statistically significant structures in "Integrals of Motion" space that could potentially be related to merger events.
  • Stellar halos and globular cluster (GC) systems contain valuable information regarding the assembly history of their host galaxies. Motivated by the detection of a significant rotation signal in the outer halo GC system of M31, we investigate the likelihood of detecting such a rotation signal in projection, using cosmological simulations. To this end we select subsets of tagged particles in the halos of the Aquarius simulations to represent mock GC systems, and analyse their kinematics. We find that GC systems can exhibit a non-negligible rotation signal provided the associated stellar halo also has a net angular momentum. The ability to detect this rotation signal is highly dependent on the viewing perspective, and the probability of seeing a signal larger than that measured in M31 ranges from 10% to 90% for the different halos in the Aquarius suite. High values are found from a perspective such that the projected angular momentum of the GC system is within 40 deg of the rotation axis determined via the projected positions and line-of-sight velocities of the GCs. Furthermore, the true 3D angular momentum of the outer stellar halo is relatively well aligned, within 35 deg, with that of the mock GC systems. We argue that the net angular momentum in the mock GC systems arises naturally when the majority of the material is accreted from a preferred direction, namely along the dominant dark matter filament of the large-scale structure that the halos are embedded in. This, together with the favourable edge-on view of M31's disk suggests that it is not a coincidence that a large rotation signal has been measured for its outer halo GC system.
  • A central tenet of the current cosmological paradigm is that galaxies grow over time through the accretion of smaller systems. Here, we present new kinematic measurements near the centre of one of the densest pronounced substructures, the South-West Cloud, in the outer halo of our nearest giant neighbour, the Andromeda galaxy. These observations reveal that the kinematic properties of this region of the South-West Cloud are consistent with those of PA-8, a globular cluster previously shown to be co-spatial with the stellar substructure. In this sense the situation is reminiscent of the handful of globular clusters that sit near the heart of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy, a system that is currently being accreted into the Milky Way, confirming that accretion deposits not only stars but also globular clusters into the halos of large galaxies.
  • We present three newly discovered globular clusters (GCs) in the Local Group dwarf irregular NGC 6822. Two are luminous and compact, while the third is a very low luminosity diffuse cluster. We report the integrated optical photometry of the clusters, drawing on archival CFHT/Megacam data. The spatial positions of the new GCs are consistent with the linear alignment of the already-known clusters. The most luminous of the new GCs is also highly elliptical, which we speculate may be due to the low tidal field in its environment.