• Tabetha S. Boyajian, Roi Alonso, Alex Ammerman, David Armstrong, A. Asensio Ramos, K. Barkaoui, Thomas G. Beatty, Z. Benkhaldoun, Paul Benni, Rory Bentley, Andrei Berdyugin, Svetlana Berdyugina, Serge Bergeron, Allyson Bieryla, Michaela G. Blain, Alicia Capetillo Blanco, Eva H. L. Bodman, Anne Boucher, Mark Bradley, Stephen M. Brincat, Thomas G. Brink, John Briol, David J. A. Brown, J.Budaj, A. Burdanov, B. Cale, Miguel Aznar Carbo, R. Castillo Garcia, Wendy J Clark, Geoffrey C. Clayton, James L. Clem, Phillip H Coker, Evan M. Cook, Chris M. Copperwheat, J. Curtis, R. M. Cutri, B. Cseh, C. H. Cynamon, Alex J. Daniels, James R. A. Davenport, Hans J. Deeg, Roberto De Lorenzo, Thomas De Jaeger, Jean-Bruno Desrosiers, John Dolan, D. J. Dowhos, Franky Dubois, R. Durkee, Shawn Dvorak, Lynn Easley, N. Edwards, Tyler G. Ellis, Emery Erdelyi, Steve Ertel, Rafael. G. Farfán, J. Farihi, Alexei V. Filippenko, Emma Foxell, Davide Gandolfi, Faustino Garcia, F. Giddens, M. Gillon, Juan-Luis González-Carballo, C. González-Fernández, J. I. González Hernández, Keith A. Graham, Kenton A. Greene, J. Gregorio, Na'ama Hallakoun, Ottó Hanyecz, G. R. Harp, Gregory W. Henry, E. Herrero, Caleb F. Hildbold, D. Hinzel, G. Holgado, Bernadett Ignácz, Valentin D. Ivanov, E. Jehin, Helen E. Jermak, Steve Johnston, S. Kafka, Csilla Kalup, Emmanuel Kardasis, Shai Kaspi, Grant M. Kennedy, F. Kiefer, C. L. Kielty, Dennis Kessler, H. Kiiskinen, T. L. Killestein, Ronald A. King, V. Kollar, H. Korhonen, C. Kotnik, Réka Könyves-Tóth, Levente Kriskovics, Nathan Krumm, Vadim Krushinsky, E. Kundra, Francois-Rene Lachapelle, D. Lacourse, P. Lake, Kristine Lam, Gavin P. Lamb, Dave Lane, Marie Wingyee Lau, Pablo Lewin, Chris Lintott, Carey Lisse, Ludwig Logie, Nicolas Longeard, M. Lopez Villanueva, E. Whit Ludington, A. Mainzer, Lison Malo, Chris Maloney, A. Mann, A. Mantero, Massimo Marengo, Jon Marchant, M. J. Martinez González, Joseph R. Masiero, Jon C. Mauerhan, James Mccormac, Aaron Mcneely, Huan Y. A. Meng, Mike Miller, Lawrence A. Molnar, J. C. Morales, Brett M. Morris, Matthew W. Muterspaugh, David Nespral, C. R. Nugent, Katherine M. Nugent, A. Odasso, Derek O'keeffe, A. Oksanen, John M. O'meara, András Ordasi, Hugh Osborn, John J. Ott, J. R. Parks, Diego Rodriguez Perez, Vance Petriew, R. Pickard, András Pál, P. Plavchan, C. Westendorp Plaza, Don Pollacco, F. Pozo Nuñez, F. J. Pozuelos, Steve Rau, Seth Redfield, Howard Relles, I. Ribas, Jon Richards, Joonas L. O. Saario, Emily J. Safron, J. Martin Sallai, Krisztián Sárneczky, Bradley E. Schaefer, Clea F. Schumer, Madison Schwartzendruber, Michael H. Siegel, Andrew P. V. Siemion, Brooke D. Simmons, Joshua D. Simon, S. Simón-Diaz, Michael L. Sitko, Hector Socas-Navarro, Á. Sódor, Donn Starkey, Iain A. Steele, Geoff Stone, R.A. Street, Tricia Sullivan, J. Suomela, J. J. Swift, Gyula M. Szabó, Róbert Szabó, Róbert Szakáts, Tamás Szalai, Angelle M. Tanner, B. Toledo-Padrón, Tamás Tordai, Amaury H.M.J. Triaud, Jake D. Turner, Joseph H. Ulowetz, Marian Urbanik, Siegfried Vanaverbeke, Andrew Vanderburg, Krisztián Vida, Brad P. Vietje, József Vinkó, K. Von Braun, Elizabeth O. Waagen, Dan Walsh, Christopher A. Watson, R.C. Weir, Klaus Wenzel, Michael W. Williamson, Jason T. Wright, M. C. Wyatt, Weikang Zheng, Gabriella Zsidi
    Jan. 2, 2018 astro-ph.SR, astro-ph.EP
    We present a photometric detection of the first brightness dips of the unique variable star KIC 8462852 since the end of the Kepler space mission in 2013 May. Our regular photometric surveillance started in October 2015, and a sequence of dipping began in 2017 May continuing on through the end of 2017, when the star was no longer visible from Earth. We distinguish four main 1-2.5% dips, named "Elsie," "Celeste," "Skara Brae," and "Angkor", which persist on timescales from several days to weeks. Our main results so far are: (i) there are no apparent changes of the stellar spectrum or polarization during the dips; (ii) the multiband photometry of the dips shows differential reddening favoring non-grey extinction. Therefore, our data are inconsistent with dip models that invoke optically thick material, but rather they are in-line with predictions for an occulter consisting primarily of ordinary dust, where much of the material must be optically thin with a size scale <<1um, and may also be consistent with models invoking variations intrinsic to the stellar photosphere. Notably, our data do not place constraints on the color of the longer-term "secular" dimming, which may be caused by independent processes, or probe different regimes of a single process.
  • We present photometry, spectra, and spectropolarimetry of supernova (SN) 2012ab, mostly obtained over the course of $\sim 300$ days after discovery. SN 2012ab was a Type IIn (SN IIn) event discovered near the nucleus of spiral galaxy 2MASXJ12224762+0536247. While its light curve resembles that of SN 1998S, its spectral evolution does not. We see indications of CSM interaction in the strong intermediate-width emission features, the high luminosity (peak at absolute magnitude $M=-19.5$), and the lack of broad absorption features in the spectrum. The H$\alpha$ emission undergoes a peculiar transition. At early times it shows a broad blue emission wing out to $-14{,}000$ km $\mathrm{s^{-1}}$ and a truncated red wing. Then at late times ($>$ 100$\,$days) it shows a truncated blue wing and a very broad red emission wing out to roughly $+20{,}000$ km $\mathrm{s^{-1}}$. This late-time broad red wing probably arises in the reverse shock. Spectra also show an asymmetric intermediate-width H$\alpha$ component with stronger emission on the red side at late times. The evolution of the asymmetric profiles requires a density structure in the distant CSM that is highly aspherical. Our spectropolarimetric data also suggest asphericity with a strong continuum polarization of $\sim 1-3$% and depolarization in the H$\alpha$ line, indicating asphericity in the CSM at a level comparable to that in other SNe IIn. We estimate a mass-loss rate of $\dot{M} = 0.050\, {\rm M}_{\odot}\,\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$ for $v_{\rm pre} = 100$$\,$km$\,$$\mathrm{s^{-1}}$ extending back at least 75$\,$yr prior to the SN. The strong departure from axisymmetry in the CSM of SN 2012ab may suggest that the progenitor was an eccentric binary system undergoing eruptive mass loss.
  • We explore simple semi-analytic fits to the bolometric light curve of Gaia17biu/SN 2017egm, the most nearby hydrogen-deficient superluminous supernova (SLSN I) yet discovered. SN 2017egm has a quasi-bolometric light curve that is uncharacteristic of other SLSN I by having a nearly linear rise to maximum and decline from peak, with a very sharp transition. Magnetar models have difficulty explaining the sharp peak and may tend to be too bright 20 d after maximum. Light curves powered only by radioactive decay of nickel fail on similar grounds and because they demand greater nickel mass than ejecta mass. Simple models based on circumstellar interaction do have a sharp peak corresponding to the epoch when the forward shock breaks out of the optically-thick circumstellar medium or the reverse shock reaches the inside of the ejecta. We find that models based on circumstellar interaction with a constant-density shell provide an interesting fit to the bolometric light curve from 15 d before to 15 d after peak light of SN 2017egm and that both magnetar and radioactive decay models fail to fit the sharp peak. Future photometric observations should easily discriminate basic CSI models from basic magnetar models. The implications of a CSI model are briefly discussed.
  • We present a detailed spectral analysis of Type Iax SN 2011ay. Our spectra cover epochs between -3 and +19 days with respect to the maximum light in B-band. This time range allows us to employ a so-called abundance tomography technique. The synthetic spectral fitting was made with the 1D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code TARDIS. In this paper, we describe our method to fit multiple epochs with a self-consistent, stratified atmospheric model. We compare our results to previously published SYN++ models and the predictions of different explosion scenarios. Using a fixed density profile (exponential fit of W7), we find that a uniform abundance model cannot reproduce the spectral features before maximum light because of the emergence of excessively strong Fe lines. In our best-fit TARDIS model, we find an abundance profile that separated into two different regimes: a well-mixed region under 10,000 km s$^{-1}$ and a stratified region with decreasing IGE abundances above 10,000 km s$^{-1}$. Based on a detailed comparative analysis, our conclusion is that the available pure deflagration models cannot fully explain either the observed properties of SN 2011ay or the results of our TARDIS modeling. Further examinations are necessary to find an adequate explanation for the origin of this object.
  • 2007OR10 is currently the third largest known dwarf planet in the transneptunian region, with an effective radiometric diameter of ~1535 km. It has a slow rotation period of ~45 h that was suspected to be caused by tidal interactions with a satellite undetected at that time. Here we report on the discovery of a likely moon of 2007OR10, identified on archival Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/UVIS system images. Although the satellite is detected at two epochs, this does not allow an unambiguous determination of the orbit and the orbital period. A feasible 1.5-5.8x10^21 kg estimate for the system mass leads to a likely 35 to 100 d orbital period. The moon is about 4.2m fainter than 2007OR10 in HST images that corresponds to a diameter of 237 km assuming equal albedos with the primary. Due to the relatively small size of the moon the previous size and albedo estimates for the primary remains unchanged. With this discovery all trans-Neptunian objects larger than 1000 km are now known to harbour satellites, an important constraint for moon formation theories in the young Solar system.
  • Herein we analyse late-time (post-plateau; 103 < t < 1229 d) optical spectra of low-redshift (z < 0.016), hydrogen-rich Type IIP supernovae (SNe IIP). Our newly constructed sample contains 91 nebular spectra of 38 SNe IIP, which is the largest dataset of its kind ever analysed in one study, and many of the objects have complementary photometric data. We determined the peak and total luminosity, velocity of the peak, HWHM intensity, and profile shape for many emission lines. Temporal evolution of these values and various flux ratios are studied. We also investigate the correlations between these measurements and photometric observables, such as the peak and plateau absolute magnitudes and the late-time light curve decline rates in various optical bands. The strongest and most robust result we find is that the luminosities of all spectral features (except those of helium) tend to be higher in objects with steeper late-time V-band decline rates. A steep late-time V-band slope likely arises from less efficient trapping of gamma-rays and positrons, which could be caused by multidimensional effects such as clumping of the ejecta or asphericity of the explosion itself. Furthermore, if gamma-rays and positrons can escape more easily, then so can photons via the observed emission lines, leading to more luminous spectral features. It is also shown that SNe IIP with larger progenitor stars have ejecta with a more physically extended oxygen layer that is well-mixed with the hydrogen layer. In addition, we find a subset of objects with evidence for asymmetric Ni-56 ejection, likely bipolar in shape. We also compare our observations to theoretical late-time spectral models of SNe IIP from two separate groups and find moderate-to-good agreement with both sets of models. Our SNe IIP spectra are consistent with models of 12-15 M_Sun progenitor stars having relatively low metallicity (Z $\le$ 0.01).
  • We present an improved version of a light curve model, which is able to estimate the physical properties of different types of core-collapse supernovae having double-peaked light curves, in a quick and efficient way. The model is based on a two-component configuration consisting of a dense, inner region and an extended, low-mass envelope. Using this configuration, we estimate the initial parameters of the progenitor via fitting the shape of the quasi-bolometric light curves of 10 SNe, including Type IIP and IIb events, with model light curves. In each case we compare the fitting results with available hydrodynamic calculations, and also match the derived expansion velocities with the observed ones. Furthermore, we also compare our calculations with hydrodynamic models derived by the SNEC code, and examine the uncertainties of the estimated physical parameters caused by the assumption of constant opacity and the inaccurate knowledge of the moment of explosion.
  • SN 2013df is a nearby Type IIb supernova that seems to be the spectroscopic twin of the well-known SN 1993J. Previous studies revealed many, but not all interesting properties of this event. Our goal was to add new understanding of both the early and late-time phases of SN 2013df. Our spectral analysis is based on 6 optical spectra obtained with the 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope during the first month after explosion, complemented by a near-infrared spectrum. We applied the SYNAPPS spectral synthesis code to constrain the chemical composition and physical properties of the ejecta. A principal result is the identification of "high-velocity" He I lines in the early spectra of SN 2013df, manifest as the blue component of the double-troughed profile at ~5650 A. This finding, together with the lack of clear separation of H and He lines in velocity space, indicates that both H and He features form at the outer envelope during the early phases. We also obtained ground-based BVRI and g'r'i'z' photometric data up to +45 days and unfiltered measurements with the ROTSE-IIIb telescope up to +168 days. From the modelling of the early-time quasi-bolometric light curve, we find $M_{ej} \sim 3.2-4.6 M_{\odot}$ and $E_{kin} \sim 2.6-2.8 \times 10^{51}$ erg for the initial ejecta mass and the initial kinetic energy, respectively, which agree well with the values derived from the separate modelling of the light-curve tail. Late-time mid-infrared excess indicates circumstellar interaction starting ~1 year after explosion, in accordance with previously published optical, X-ray, and radio data.
  • We report evidence for excess blue light from the Type Ia supernova SN 2012cg at fifteen and sixteen days before maximum B-band brightness. The emission is consistent with predictions for the impact of the supernova on a non-degenerate binary companion. This is the first evidence for emission from a companion to a SN Ia. Sixteen days before maximum light, the B-V color of SN 2012cg is 0.2 mag bluer than for other normal SN~Ia. At later times, this supernova has a typical SN Ia light curve, with extinction-corrected M_B = -19.62 +/- 0.02 mag and Delta m_{15}(B) = 0.86 +/- 0.02. Our data set is extensive, with photometry in 7 filters from 5 independent sources. Early spectra also show the effects of blue light, and high-velocity features are observed at early times. Near maximum, the spectra are normal with a silicon velocity v_{Si} = -10,500$ km s^{-1}. Comparing the early data with models by Kasen (2010) favors a main-sequence companion of about 6 solar masses. It is possible that many other SN Ia have main-sequence companions that have eluded detection because the emission from the impact is fleeting and faint.
  • We present direct spectroscopic modeling of 11 high-S/N observed spectra of the Type Ia SN 2010kg, taken between -10 and +5 days with respect to B-maximum. The synthetic spectra, calculated with the SYN++ code, span the range between 4100 and 8500 \r{A}. Our results are in good agreement with previous findings for other Type Ia SNe. Most of the spectral features are formed at or close to the photosphere, but some ions, like Fe II and Mg II, also form features at ~2000 - 5000 km s$^{-1}$ above the photosphere. The well-known high-velocity features of the Ca II IR-triplet as well as Si II $\lambda$6355 are also detected. The single absorption feature at ~4400 \r{A}, which usually has been identified as due to Si III, is poorly fit with Si III in SN 2010kg. We find that the fit can be improved by assuming that this feature is due to either C III or O II, located in the outermost part of the ejecta, ~4000 - 5000 km s$^{-1}$ above the photosphere. Since the presence of C III is unlikely, because of the lack of the necessary excitation/ionization conditions in the outer ejecta, we identify this feature as due to O II. The simultaneous presence of O I and O II is in good agreement with the optical depth calculations and the temperature distribution in the ejecta of SN 2010kg. This could be the first identification of singly ionized oxygen in a Type Ia SN atmosphere.
  • We present a detailed study of the early phases of the peculiar supernova 2011ay based on BVRI photometry obtained at Konkoly Observatory, Hungary, and optical spectra taken with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory, Texas. The spectral analysis carried out with SYN++ and SYNAPPS confirms that SN 2011ay belongs to the recently defined class of SNe Iax, which is also supported by the properties of its light and color curves. The estimated photospheric temperature around maximum light, T_{phot} ~8,000 K, is lower than in most Type Ia SNe, which results in the appearance of strong Fe II features in the spectra of SN 2011ay, even during the early phases. We also show that strong blending with metal features (those of Ti II, Fe II, Co II) makes the direct analysis of the broad spectral features very difficult, and this may be true for all SNe Iax. We find two alternative spectrum models that both describe the observed spectra adequately, but their photospheric velocities differ by at least 3,000 km/s. The quasi-bolometric light curve of SN~2011ay has been assembled by integrating the UV-optical spectral energy distributions. Fitting a modified Arnett-model to L_{bol}(t), the moment of explosion and other physical parameters, i.e. the rise time to maximum, the ^{56}Ni mass and the total ejecta mass are estimated as t_{rise} ~14 +/-1 days, M_{Ni} ~0.22 +/- 0.01 M_{sol} and M_{ej} ~0.8 M_{sol}, respectively.
  • "High-velocity features" (HVFs) are spectral features in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) that have minima indicating significantly higher (by greater than about 6000 km/s) velocities than typical "photospheric-velocity features" (PVFs). The PVFs are absorption features with minima indicating typical photospheric (i.e., bulk ejecta) velocities (usually ~9000-15,000 km/s near B-band maximum brightness). In this work we undertake the most in-depth study of HVFs ever performed. The dataset used herein consists of 445 low-resolution optical and near-infrared (NIR) spectra (at epochs up to 5 d past maximum brightness) of 210 low-redshift SNe Ia that follow the "Phillips relation." A series of Gaussian functions is fit to the data in order to characterise possible HVFs of Ca II H&K, Si II {\lambda}6355, and the Ca II NIR triplet. The temporal evolution of the velocities and strengths of the PVFs and HVFs of these three spectral features is investigated, as are possible correlations with other SN Ia observables. We find that while HVFs of Ca II are regularly observed (except in underluminous SNe Ia, where they are never found), HVFs of Si II {\lambda}6355 are significantly rarer, and they tend to exist at the earliest epochs and mostly in objects with large photospheric velocities. It is also shown that stronger HVFs of Si II {\lambda}6355 are found in objects that lack C II absorption at early times and that have red ultraviolet/optical colours near maximum brightness. These results lead to a self-consistent connection between the presence and strength of HVFs of Si II {\lambda}6355 and many other mutually correlated SN~Ia observables, including photospheric velocity.
  • The aim of this work is to present a semi-analytical light curve modeling code which can be used for estimating physical properties of core collapse supernovae (SNe) in a quick and efficient way. To verify our code we fit light curves of Type II SNe and compare our best parameter estimates to those from hydrodynamical calculations. For this analysis we use the quasi-bolometric light curves of five different Type IIP supernovae. In each case we get appropriate results for the initial pre-supernova parameters. We conclude that this semi-analytical light curve model is useful to get approximate physical properties of Type II SNe without using time-consuming numerical hydrodynamic simulations.
  • We report spectroscopic and photometric observations of the Type IIb SN 2011dh obtained between 4 and 34 days after the estimated date of explosion (May 31.5 UT). The data cover a wide wavelength range from 2,000 Angstroms in the UV to 2.4 microns in the NIR. Optical spectra provide line profiles and velocity measurements of HI, HeI, CaII and FeII that trace the composition and kinematics of the SN. NIR spectra show that helium is present in the atmosphere as early as 11 days after the explosion. A UV spectrum obtained with the STIS reveals that the UV flux for SN 2011dh is low compared to other SN IIb. The HI and HeI velocities in SN 2011dh are separated by about 4,000 km/s at all phases. We estimate that the H-shell of SN 2011dh is about 8 times less massive than the shell of SN 1993J and about 3 times more massive than the shell of SN 2008ax. Light curves (LC) for twelve passbands are presented. The maximum bolometric luminosity of $1.8 \pm 0.2 \times 10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$ occurred about 22 days after the explosion. NIR emission provides more than 30% of the total bolometric flux at the beginning of our observations and increases to nearly 50% of the total by day 34. The UV produces 16% of the total flux on day 4, 5% on day 9 and 1% on day 34. We compare the bolometric light curves of SN 2011dh, SN 2008ax and SN 1993J. The LC are very different for the first twelve days after the explosions but all three SN IIb display similar peak luminosities, times of peak, decline rates and colors after maximum. This suggests that the progenitors of these SN IIb may have had similar compositions and masses but they exploded inside hydrogen shells that that have a wide range of masses. The detailed observations presented here will help evaluate theoretical models for this supernova and lead to a better understanding of SN IIb.
  • The Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2013dy in NGC 7250 (d ~ 13.7 Mpc) was discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search. Combined with a prediscovery detection by the Italian Supernova Search Project, we are able to constrain the first-light time of SN 2013dy to be only 0.10 +/- 0.05 d (2.4 +/- 1.2 hr) before the first detection. This makes SN 2013dy the earliest known detection of an SN Ia. We infer an upper limit on the radius of the progenitor star of R_0 < 0.25 R_sun, consistent with that of a white dwarf. The light curve exhibits a broken power law with exponents of 0.88 and then 1.80. A spectrum taken 1.63 d after first light reveals a C II absorption line comparable in strength to Si II. This is the strongest C II feature ever detected in a normal SN Ia, suggesting that the progenitor star had significant unburned material. The C II line in SN 2013dy weakens rapidly and is undetected in a spectrum 7 days later, indicating that C II is detectable for only a very short time in some SNe Ia. SN 2013dy reached a B-band maximum of M_B = -18.72 +/- 0.03 mag ~17.7 d after first light.
  • The Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) SN 2000cx was one of the most peculiar transients ever discovered, with a rise to maximum brightness typical of a SN Ia, but a slower decline and a higher photospheric temperature. Thirteen years later SN 2013bh (aka iPTF13abc), a near identical twin, was discovered and we obtained optical and near-IR photometry and low-resolution optical spectroscopy from discovery until about 1 month past r-band maximum brightness. The spectra of both objects show iron-group elements (Co II, Ni II, Fe II, Fe III, and high-velocity features [HVFs] of Ti II), intermediate-mass elements (Si II, Si III, and S II), and separate normal velocity features (~12000 km/s) and HVFs (~24000 km/s) of Ca II. Persistent absorption from Fe III and Si III, along with the colour evolution, imply high blackbody temperatures for SNe 2013bh and 2000cx (~12000 K). Both objects lack narrow Na I D absorption and exploded in the outskirts of their hosts, indicating that the SN environments were relatively free of interstellar or circumstellar material and may imply that the progenitors came from a relatively old and low-metallicity stellar population. Models of SN 2000cx, seemingly applicable to SN 2013bh, imply the production of up to ~1 M_Sun of Ni-56 and (4.3-5.5)e-3 M_Sun of fast-moving Ca ejecta.
  • On 2012 May 17.2 UT, only 1.5 +/- 0.2 d after explosion, we discovered SN 2012cg, a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in NGC 4424 (d ~ 15 Mpc). As a result of the newly modified strategy employed by the Lick Observatory SN Search, a sequence of filtered images was obtained starting 161 s after discovery. Utilizing recent models describing the interaction of SN ejecta with a companion star, we rule out a ~1 M_Sun companion for half of all viewing angles and a red-giant companion for nearly all orientations. SN 2012cg reached a B-band maximum of 12.09 +/- 0.02 mag on 2012 June 2.0 and took ~17.3 d from explosion to reach this, typical for SNe Ia. Our pre-maximum brightness photometry shows a narrower-than-average B-band light curve for SN 2012cg, though slightly overluminous at maximum brightness and with normal color evolution (including some of the earliest SN Ia filtered photometry ever obtained). Spectral fits to SN 2012cg reveal ions typically found in SNe Ia at early times, with expansion velocities >14,000 km/s at 2.5 d past explosion. Absorption from C II is detected early, as well as high-velocity components of both Si II 6355 Ang. and Ca II. Our last spectrum (13.5 d past explosion) resembles that of the somewhat peculiar SN Ia 1999aa. This suggests that SN 2012cg will have a slower-than-average declining light curve, which may be surprising given the faster-than-average rising light curve.
  • We present generalized supernova (SN) light curve (LC) models for a variety of power inputs. We provide an expression for the power input that is produced by self-similar forward and reverse shocks in SN ejecta - circumstellar matter (CSM) interaction. We find that this ejecta-CSM interaction luminosity is in agreement with results from multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations in the optically-thin case. We develop a model for the case of an optically-thick CSM by invoking an approximation for the effects of radiative diffusion. In the context of this model, we provide predictions for the time of forward shock break-out from the optically-thick part of the CSM envelope. We also introduce a hybrid LC model that incorporates ejecta-CSM interaction plus Ni-56 and Co-56 radioactive decay input. We fit this hybrid model to the LC of the Super-Luminous Supernova (SLSN) 2006gy. We find that this model provides a better fit to the LC of this event than previously presented models. We also address the relation between Type IIL and Type IIn SN with ejecta-CSM interaction models. Forward and reverse shock power input due to CSM interaction can produce the LCs of Type IIn SNe in terms of duration, shape and decline rate. This model can also produce LCs that are symmetric in shape around peak luminosity. We conclude that the observed LC variety of SNe Type IIn and of the SLSNe is likely to be a byproduct of the large range of conditions relevant to significant ejecta-CSM interaction as a power source.
  • We report the serendipitous discovery of a heavily reddened Wolf-Rayet star that we name WR142b. While photometrically monitoring a cataclysmic variable, we detected weak variability in a nearby field star. Low-resolution spectroscopy revealed a strong emission line at 7100 Ang., suggesting an unusual object and prompting further study. A spectrum taken with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope confirms strong HeII emission and a NIV 7112 Ang. line consistent with a nitrogen-rich Wolf-Rayet star of spectral class WN6. Analysis of the HeII line strengths reveals no detectable hydrogen in WR142b. A blue-sensitive spectrum obtained with the Large Binocular Telescope shows no evidence for a hot companion star. The continuum shape and emission line ratios imply a reddening of E(B-V)=2.2 to 2.5 mag. If not for the dust extinction, this new Wolf-Rayet star could be visible to the naked eye.
  • One of the major differences between various explosion scenarios of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is the remaining amount of unburned (C+O) material and its velocity distribution within the expanding ejecta. While oxygen absorption features are not uncommon in the spectra of SNe Ia before maximum light, the presence of strong carbon absorption has been reported only in a minority of objects, typically during the pre-maximum phase. The reported low frequency of carbon detections may be due to low signal-to-noise data, low abundance of unburned material, line blending between C II 6580 and Si II 6355, ejecta temperature differences, asymmetrical distribution effects, or a combination of these. However, a survey of published pre-maximum spectra reveals that more SNe Ia than previously thought may exhibit C II 6580 absorption features and relics of line blending near 6300 Angstroms. Here we present new SN Ia observations where spectroscopic signatures of C II 6580 are detected, and investigate the presence of C II 6580 in the optical spectra of 19 SNe Ia using the parameterized spectrum synthesis code, SYNOW. Most of the objects in our sample that exhibit C II 6580 absorption features are of the low-velocity gradient subtype. Our study indicates that the morphology of carbon-rich regions is consistent with either a spherical distribution or a hemispheric asymmetry, supporting the recent idea that SN Ia diversity may be a result of off-center ignition coupled with observer line-of-sight effects.
  • We present multi-band photometry and multi-epoch spectroscopy of the peculiar Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2007qd, discovered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. It possesses physical properties intermediate to those of the peculiar SN 2002cx and the extremely low-luminosity SN 2008ha. Optical photometry indicates that it had an extraordinarily fast rise time of <= 10 days and a peak absolute B magnitude of -15.4 +/- 0.2 at most, making it one of the most subluminous SN Ia ever observed. Follow-up spectroscopy of SN 2007qd near maximum brightness unambiguously shows the presence of intermediate-mass elements which are likely caused by carbon/oxygen nuclear burning. Near maximum brightness, SN 2007qd had a photospheric velocity of only 2800 km/s, similar to that of SN 2008ha but about 4000 and 7000 km/s less than that of SN 2002cx and normal SN Ia, respectively. We show that the peak luminosities of SN 2002cx-like objects are highly correlated with both their light-curve stretch and photospheric velocities. Its strong apparent connection to other SN 2002cx-like events suggests that SN 2007qd is also a pure deflagration of a white dwarf, although other mechanisms cannot be ruled out. It may be a critical link between SN 2008ha and the other members of the SN 2002cx-like class of objects.
  • We consider simple models based on core collapse or pair-formation supernovae to account for the light curve of the transient SCP06F6. A radioactive decay diffusion model provides estimates of the mass of the required radioactive nickel and the ejecta as functions of the unknown redshift. An opacity change such as by dust formation or a recombination front may account for the rapid decline from maximum. We particularly investigate two specific redshifts: $z=0.143$, for which Gaensicke et al. (2008) have proposed that the unidentified broad absorption features in the spectrum of SCP06F6 are C$_{2}$ Swan bands, and $z=0.57$ based on a crude agreement with the Ca H&K and UV iron-peak absorption features that are characteristic of supernovae of various types. The ejected masses and kinetic energies are smaller for a more tightly constrained model invoking envelope recombination. We also discuss the possibilities of circumstellar matter (CSM) shell diffusion and shock interaction models. In general, optically-thick CSM diffusion models can fit the data with the underlying energy coming from an energetic buried supernova. Models in which the CSM is of lower density so that the shock energy is both rapidly thermalized and radiated tend not to be self-consistent. We suggest that a model of SCP06F6 worth futher exploration is one in which the redshift is $\sim$ 0.57, the spectral features are Ca and iron peak elements, and the light curve is powered by the diffusive release of a substantial amount of energy from nickel decay or from an energetic supernova buried in the ejecta of an LBV-like event.
  • We present a Spitzer IRAC and MIPS survey of NGC 2451 A and B, two open clusters in the 50-80 Myr age range. We complement these data with extensive ground-based photometry and spectroscopy to identify the cluster members in the Spitzer survey field. We find only two members with 8 micron excesses. The incidence of excesses at 24 microns is much higher, 11 of 31 solar-like stars and 1 of 7 early-type (A) stars. This work nearly completes the debris disk surveys with Spitzer of clusters in the 30-130 Myr range. This range is of inte rest because it is when large planetesimal collisions may have still been relatively common (as indicated by the one that led to the formation of the Moon during this period of the evolution of the Solar System). We review the full set of surveys and find that there are only three possible cases out of about 250 roughly solar-mass stars where very large excesses suggest that such collisions have occurred recently.
  • Distance to the Whirlpool Galaxy (M51, NGC 5194) is estimated using published photometry and spectroscopy of the Type II-P supernova SN 2005cs. Both the Expanding Photosphere Method (EPM) and the Standard Candle Method (SCM), suitable for SNe II-P, were applied. The average distance (7.1 \pm 1.2 Mpc) is in good agreement with earlier SBF- and PNLF-based distances, but slightly longer than the distance obtained by Baron et al. for SN 1994I via the Spectral Fitting Expanding Atmosphere Method (SEAM). Since SN 2005cs exhibited low expansion velocity during the plateau phase, similarly to SN 1999br, the constants of SCM were re-calibrated including the data of SN 2005cs as well. The new relation is better constrained in the low velocity regime (v_{ph}(50) ~ 1500 - 2000$ km/s), that may result in better distance estimates for such SNe. The physical parameters of SN 2005cs and its progenitor are re-evaluated based on the updated distance. All the available data support the low-mass (~ 9 M_\odot) progenitor scenario proposed previously by its direct detection with the Hubble Space Telescope.