• A quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulator is a novel two-dimensional quantum state of matter that features quantized Hall conductance in the absence of magnetic field, resulting from topologically protected dissipationless edge states that bridge the energy gap opened by band inversion and strong spin-orbit coupling. By investigating electronic structure of epitaxially grown monolayer 1T'-WTe2 using angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) and first principle calculations, we observe clear signatures of the topological band inversion and the band gap opening, which are the hallmarks of a QSH state. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements further confirm the correct crystal structure and the existence of a bulk band gap, and provide evidence for a modified electronic structure near the edge that is consistent with the expectations for a QSH insulator. Our results establish monolayer 1T'-WTe2 as a new class of QSH insulator with large band gap in a robust two-dimensional materials family of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs).
  • Here we report the evidence of the type II Dirac Fermion in the layered crystal PdTe2. The de Haas-van Alphen oscillations find a small Fermi pocket with a cross section of 0.077nm-2 with a nontrivial Berry phase. First-principal calculations reveal that it is originated from the hole pocket of a tilted Dirac cone. Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy demonstrates a type II Dirac cone featured dispersion. We also suggest PdTe2 is an improved platform to host the topological superconductors.
  • An extreme magnetoresistance (XMR) has recently been observed in several non-magnetic semimetals. Increasing experimental and theoretical evidence indicates that the XMR can be driven by either topological protection or electron-hole compensation. Here, by investigating the electronic structure of a XMR material, YSb, we present spectroscopic evidence for a special case which lacks topological protection and perfect electron-hole compensation. Further investigations reveal that a cooperative action of a substantial difference between electron and hole mobility and a moderate carrier compensation might contribute to the XMR in YSb.
  • The unconventional magnetoresistance of ZrSiS single crystals is found unsaturated till the magnetic field of 53 T with the butterfly shaped angular dependence. Intense Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations resolve a bulk Dirac cone with a nontrivial Berry phase, where the Fermi surface area is 1.80*10^-3 {\AA}-2 and reaches the quantum limit before 20 T. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurement reveals an electronic state with the two-dimensional nature around the X point of Brillouin zone boundary. By integrating the density functional theory calculations, ZrSiS is suggested to be a Dirac material with both surface and bulk Dirac bands.
  • Topological quantum materials represent a new class of matter with both exotic physical phenomena and novel application potentials. Many Heusler compounds, which exhibit rich emergent properties such as unusual magnetism, superconductivity and heavy fermion behaviour, have been predicted to host non-trivial topological electronic structures. The coexistence of topological order and other unusual properties makes Heusler materials ideal platform to search for new topological quantum phases (such as quantum anomalous Hall insulator and topological superconductor). By carrying out angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and ab initio calculations on rare-earth half-Heusler compounds LnPtBi (Ln=Lu, Y), we directly observed the unusual topological surface states on these materials, establishing them as first members with non-trivial topological electronic structure in this class of materials. Moreover, as LnPtBi compounds are non-centrosymmetric superconductors, our discovery further highlights them as promising candidates of topological superconductors.
  • Unsaturated magnetoresistance (MR) has been reported in WTe2, and remains irrepressible up to very high field. Intense optimization of the crystalline quality causes a squarely-increasing MR, as interpreted by perfect compensation of opposite carriers. Herein we report our observation of linear MR (LMR) in WTe2 crystals, the onset of which is first identified by constructing the mobility spectra of the MR at low fields. The LMR further intensifies and predominates at fields higher than 20 Tesla while the parabolic MR gradually decays. The LMR remains unsaturated up to a high field of 60 Tesla and persists, even at a high pressure of 6.2 GPa. Assisted by density functional theory calculations and detailed mobility spectra, we find the LMR to be robust against the applications of high field, broken carrier balance, and mobility suppression. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy reveals a unique quasilinear energy dispersion near the Fermi level. Our results suggest that the robust LMR is the low bound of the unsaturated MR in WTe2.
  • The in-plane resistivity anisotropy has been studied with the Montgomery method on two detwinned parent compounds of the iron-based superconductors, NaFeAs and FeTe. For NaFeAs, the resistivity in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) direction is smaller than that in the ferromagnetic (FM) direction, similar to that observed in BaFe2As2 before. While for FeTe, the resistivity in the AFM direction is larger than that in the FM direction. We show that these two opposite resistivity anisotropy behaviors could be attributed to the strong Hund's rule coupling effects: while the iron pnictides are in the itinerant regime, where the Hund's rule coupling causes strong reconstruction and nematicity of the electronic structure; the FeTe is in the localized regime, where Hund's rule coupling makes hopping along the FM direction easier than along the AFMdirection, similar to the colossal magnetoresistance observed in some manganites.
  • Although nodeless superconducting gap has been observed on the large Fermi pockets around the zone corner in KxFe2-ySe2, whether its pairing symmetry is s-wave or nodeless d-wave is still under intense debate. Here we report an isotropic superconducting gap distribution on the small electron Fermi pocket around the Z point in KxFe2-ySe2, which favors the s-wave pairing symmetry.
  • The superconducting gap is a pivotal character for a superconductor. While the cuprates and conventional phonon-mediated superconductors are characterized by distinct d-wave and s-wave pairing symmetry with nodal and nodeless gap distribution respectively, the superconducting gap distributions in iron-based superconductors are rather diversified. While nodeless gap distributions have been directly observed in Ba1-xKxFe2As2, BaFe2-xCoxAs2, KxFe2-ySe2, and FeTe1-xSex, the signatures of nodal superconducting gap have been reported in LaOFeP, LiFeP, KFe2As2, BaFe2(As1-xPx)2, BaFe2-xRuxAs2 and FeSe. We here report the angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements on the superconducting gap structure of BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 in the momentum space, and particularly, the first direct observation of a circular line node on the largest hole Fermi surface around the Z point at the Brillouin zone boundary. Our data rules out the d-wave pairing origin of the nodal gap, and unify both the nodaland nodeless gaps in iron pnictides under the s\pm pairing symmetry.
  • While the parent compounds of the cuprate high temperature superconductors (high-Tc's) are Mott insulators, the iron-pnictide high-Tc's are in the vicinity of a metallic spin density wave (SDW) state, which highlights the difference between these two families. However, insulating parent compounds were identified for the newly discovered KxFe2-ySe2. This raises an intriguing question as to whether the iron-based high-Tc's could be viewed as doped Mott insulators like the cuprates. Here we report angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) evidence of two insulating and one semiconducting phases of KxFe2-ySe2, and the mesoscopic phase separation between the superconducting/semiconducting phase and the insulating phases. The insulating phases are characterized by the depletion of electronic states over a 0.5 eV window below the chemical potential, giving a compelling evidence for the presence of Mott-like physics. The charging effects and the absence of band folding in the superconducting/semiconducting phase further prove that the static magnetic and vacancy orders are not related to the superconductivity. Instead, the electronic structure of the superconducting phase is much closer to the semiconducting phase, indicating the superconductivity is likely developed by doping the semiconducting phase rather than the insulating phases.
  • The superconductivity in high temperature superconductors ordinarily arises when doped with hetero-valent ions that introduce charge carriers. However, in ferropnictides, "iso-valent" doping, which is generally believed not to introduce charge carriers, can induce superconductivity as well. Moreover, unlike other ferropnictides, the superconducting gap in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 has been found to contain nodal lines. The exact nature of the "iso-valent" doping and nodal gap here are key open issues in building a comprehensive picture of the iron-based high temperature superconductors. With angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we found that the phosphor substitution in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 induces sizable amount of holes into the hole Fermi surfaces, while the dxy-originated band is relatively intact. This overturns the previous common belief of "iso-valent" doping, explains why the phase diagram of BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 is similar to those of the holedoped compounds, and rules out theories that explain the nodal gap based on vanishing dxy hole pocket.